Blog

Wellpepper’s Top Health Tech Stories of 2013

It’s the time of year to reflect and make lists! It’s been a great year for Wellpepper: our first full year in business. We’ve enjoyed bringing new features to our users and learning more about the needs of both patients and healthcare providers. We’re committed to building useful tools that patients and providers love to use. We’ve been inspired at conferences meeting with end-users, hospital administrators, and other startups who share the same mission of changing how patients and providers engage around their health. We’ve experienced the power of social media, met new friends through Twitter, and learned so much from Tweetchats. As a young company, it’s been a year of firsts for us that, while monumental for us, pale in comparison with the changes going on in health IT, so rather than telling you more about us, let’s talk about the year in Health Tech.

There is no scientific basis to this list, just what we think stands out from the year in Health Tech.

Healthcare.gov

The beleaguered website was definitely the top Health IT story of the year. At Wellpepper we were unable to make it through the registration process ourselves, and ended up going to a broker to find out our healthcare options. As the news came out on why the site was so bad, it was pretty obvious there was a lack of accountability and no project management. It’s really unfortunate that the Affordable Care Act was mired in this mess of an implementation, but we’re very excited that former Microsoft exec Kurt DelBene is taking the reins. Ship It!

Quantified-Self Hits the Mainstream

tec-gift-guide-fitness-trackers.jpeg-1280x960Or, “everyone is tracking.” The mainstream press started writing about fitness gadgets and our Facebook feeds were full of friends who got new FitBits for Christmas. Not sure what this means about the trend though. We have found the FitBit to be really interesting to calibrate activities, for example, a game of Ultimate Frisbee but after you know how inactive or active you are do you really need to track? And do you become okay with your activity or lack thereof?

Meaningful Use Phase Delayed

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid have delayed the deadlines for implementing Meaningful Use Stage 2. Stage 2 will be extended through 2016 and Stage 3 won’t begin until at least fiscal year 2017 for hospitals. Meaningful Use Stage 2 focuses on patient engagement, which is very minimally defined as patients interacting with healthcare information electronically. We’ve always said that electronic medical records vendors are not the best equipped to deliver tools that patients (ie consumers) want to use, so it’s not surprising that healthcare providers are struggling with this phase. That said, m-health is poised to deliver on these requirements.Wellpepper2-1195a

M-Health Comes of Age

While we can definitely debate where we are in the m-health hype cycle, there is no question that M-Health is a formidable category. The FDA is now monitoring and releasing guidelines, albeit with little clarification. Eric Topol made headlines by using an iPhone EKG on a plane to diagnose a heart attack and and advise the captain to make an emergency landing. Most positively, we’re hearing less talk of ‘apps’, and more talk of integrating mobile health into the overall patient experience and the official hospital records.

23andMe Ignores FDA

Source: Wikipedia commons

You might consider this one to be a bit specific, but it’s representative of a number of key stories in 2013: big data, the explosion of healthcare investing, and the dramatic gulf between current Health IT and other technologies, and between Silicon Valley and the FDA. 23andMe, which does cheap DNA testing, direct to consumer, was forced to stop providing genetic results and only include ancestry after effectively ignoring FDA warnings for over a year. Speculation is that they were trying to get to a million tests (they are at about 500K) so that they could prove their tests were valid and thereby circumvent long FDA approval processes. Those on the side of the FDA saw this as Silicon Valley thumbing their nose at patient safety and regulations. Those on the side of 23andMe saw this as tech disruption at its purest. As recipients of some of the last full genetic and ancestry tests before the shut-down, expect more from us on this topic. 😉

This one is not healthtech, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention the focus on costs of care. Time Magazine, and the New York Times both published rather scathing interactive features on the costs of healthcare in the US. One of Reddit’s top threads right now is about a $50,000 appendectomy. It’s great to see these issues called to light. Let’s hope we see progress in solving them in 2014.


NewYearWP

We’re pretty excited to see what 2014 brings Wellpepper and what new innovations, disruptions, and improvements are brought to the healthcare industry as a whole. Best to you and yours from all of us at Wellpepper!

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health

Leave a Comment (0) ↓

Leave a Comment

Google+