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The Secrets of Strong CIO and CMIO Relationships

What’s the secret of a strong CIO and CMIO relationship? Many things including the ability to be adaptable, understand organizational priorities, and deadlines, but most importantly to align on shared goals and purpose.

These were some of the takeaways from the insights shared by CIOs and CMIOs of Confluence Health, and EvergreenHealth at the annual Washington State HIMSS Executive dinner. While the conversation was split between how to foster innovation, and how to manage the demands of an EMR rollout (including the resulting backlog of other IT requests), where the relationship really shone was in the implementation of tools for a shared purpose, in this case tracking and control of opioids to help curb the epidemic we’re seeing in this country.

In particular a project at EvergreenHealth to implement e-prescribing of controlled substances, showed the need for strong CMIO and CIO collaboration. The program is designed to decrease fraud and misuse of controlled substances, but it can also improve patient care. Since it involves both technology implementation and clinical guidelines it’s a perfect example of medical and technology collaboration. In Washington State, where we’re based, the Bree Collaborative also has recommended guidelines for prescribing opioids, that while optional are widely adopted across the state.

We’ve written about this problem before in pain management for total joint replacement. Sadly, an unintended consequence of the pain management question on the HCAHPS survey, is sometimes an overprescribing of prescription pain medication. According to one speaker at the event, 30mg of oxycontin over 7 days is enough to trigger an addiction, and yet often post-surgery up to 30 days of pills are prescribed. We talked to one patient (not a Wellpepper user) who reported taking all of her prescribed pain medication, not because she needed it but because it was prescribed. The first step to solving this problem is with the prescription, and EvergreenHealth’s e-prescription program, combined with locked cabinets in the operating room (the idea is that if you don’t need it immediately, you don’t actually need it), alerts on over prescribing, and programs to substitute suboxone, coupled with behavior health management can all help. As well behavior change happens with the physicians, and a powerful image was the story of a pharmacist who put a bag of unused opioid prescriptions on the table to show that even if they didn’t think so, some physicians may have been over-prescribing.

However there are ways to take it a step further: tracking what the patient actually took outside the clinic, which is why we include a pain medication usage task in many care plans. This activity asks patients some simple questions about their over-the-counter and prescribed pain medication usage, and alerts if the numbers or the length of time is over certain thresholds. It’s in use in care plans that include general pain management, surgical, and neurology (headache management), and provides a view into usage, and the opportunity to reach out and help patients outside the clinic before usage becomes a problem.

We’re strong believers in the ability for patients to record their own outcomes and experiences, and the value of combining this with prescribing and clinical data to close the loop on delivering better care. If you’re interested in learning more, get in touch.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare Legislation, HIPAA, Opioids, Outcomes, patient engagement

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