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The HIMSS Flu

As usual HIMSS was an overwhelming whirlwind of meetings, opportunities, and information. We had a great show at Wellpepper, and were impressed by a few things. First we heard a lot less about wanting the EMR to do everything. People have realized that especially for all of the patient-facing digital experience, that there need to be interoperable solutions, that are designed with the needs of the end-user in mind. Another thing we noticed was less hype that any one technology (AI, blockchain) was going to be the savior of healthcare. It seems like the market is maturing and there’s an understanding that technology is a key underpinning but only when it’s solving real problems for patients and clinicians. John Moore from Chilmark, who was attending his 11th HIMSS has a great take on this.

Each year, we come away from HIMSS with something we didn’t expect. While it’s usually new leads, partnerships, or competitive intelligence, this year for me, it was the HIMSS flu. Being in a conference center full of technology to diagnose, manage, connect with, and treat sick people, made it seem like a solution should be close by. Ironically, I had meetings with a number of physicians who said that it looked like I had the flu, but couldn’t treat me because they weren’t licensed in Florida. Also, my primary care physician couldn’t help me for this reason as well.

After seeing CirrusMD tweet at my friend and fellow patient-centered care advocate Jan Oldenburg with an offer of a consult, I thought that telemedicine might be the answer.

MDLive came through with a visit code, and I signed up. The sign-up process was pretty painless although an option to clarify where I was physically versus where I lived might have been helpful.

Once I signed up, the app told me it would notify me when it found a physician. This was the slightly confusing part, as when I exited the app and opened it again there was no record that I was in a queue for an appointment, so I started trying to sign up again. Eventually, a video visit came through while I was trying to re-register.

My doctor looked like she was taking calls from home, from the video. Unfortunately, video didn’t work very well from the HIMSS floor—not surprising given the status of the network, so we switched to phone. After a 10 minute conversation, she concluded I had the flu (she was right), and prescribed Tamiflu.

As Jan also found out when she had her asthma attack, the pharmacies near the convention center weren’t actually pharmacies, that is they didn’t offer prescription medication. For Jan it was an expensive Uber to pick up her prescription. For me it was finding a pharmacy that would be open between Orlando and Tampa where were were headed for customer meetings on Friday. By the time I got the prescription, it was 7 hours later, and with Tamiflu the timing matters.

While I was thankful to get care, here are a number of points of friction that made it more difficult than it needed to be, and also show how healthcare really hasn’t adapted to the needs of people:

  • State-based licensure makes telemedicine prohibitive. It also means that you can’t get care from your primary care or other specialists if you’re traveling. Kind of ridiculous that because the patient is physically in Florida suddenly the physician is not licensed to practice.
  • Pharmacies need more delivery options. Even locally, I’ve ended up at pharmacies that don’t take my insurance. Driving around when you’re sick is annoying, and showing up in person when you’ve got the flu is unhelpful for everyone else there.

On the licensure, it’s slow going, but states are starting to have agreements to solve this. On the delivery options, Amazon-drone delivery can’t come fast enough. Overall, the experience wasn’t terrible, and the technology worked but it certainly wasn’t seamless or convenient, and I probably infected a bunch of people while trying to get care. I’d like to apologize to anyone I may have passed the flu along to. I’m not the type to work when sick, but when you’re on the road it’s hard not to.

Also, we’d like HIMSS and all conferences to consider pop-up urgent care. The bandaids in the first-aid room weren’t enough.

Posted in: Healthcare costs, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, HIMSS, M-health, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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