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Partnership Announcement: eVideon and Wellpepper

eVideon and Wellpepper Announce Partnership to Deliver Comprehensive Patient Experience Across Care Settings

 

eVideon, a leader in hospital patient experience, and Wellpepper, a leader in interactive patient care plans, today announced a partnership to deliver comprehensive patient experiences across inpatient and outpatient settings. Both companies work with health systems to deliver a better patient experience. The partnership enables health systems to deploy integrated solutions from best-of-breed vendors. eVideon and Wellpepper are integrating their solutions so providers can deliver a consistent experience across care settings from hospital to home.

 

“Increasingly, health systems are looking for patient experiences that span inpatient and outpatient settings,” said Wellpepper CEO Anne Weiler. “The patient journey begins before a patient enters the hospital and continues long after discharge. This partnership enables an engaging and usable experience for patients across their entire journey of care.”

Wellpepper’s clinically validated digital treatment plans guide users through all the activities they need to do outside the clinic to manage an episode of care: from preparing for a clinic or hospital visit, to managing a chronic condition or recovering after hospital discharge, via patients’ preferred mobile, web, or voice devices. eVideon enhances the inpatient experience, providing personalized interactive bedside capabilities that empower patients to control their environment, learn about their conditions, access hospital services, order meals or watch movies on demand. Both companies are passionate about improving the patient experience while providing data and analytics to streamline clinician workflows and improve outcomes.

“eVideon and Wellpepper share a passion for bringing long overdue self-service to healthcare through personalized, engaging systems,” said Jeff Fallon, CEO of eVideon. “Interoperability is vital, and the value of better outcomes and streamlined workflows is undeniable – not just for patients, but for clinicians and staff too. We’re excited about the new possibilities this comprehensive solution will bring across care environments for our customers.”

The partnership enables health systems to own the end-to-end patient care pathway. Health systems can deploy eVideon’s and Wellpepper’s solutions simultaneously or sequentially. Solution architects from eVideon and Wellpepper are available to consult with healthcare technology and patient experience groups to determine the best approach for rolling out a comprehensive solution.

About eVideon

eVideon digitizes hospitals with a suite of bedside engagement systems, hospital TV, digital signage, and other interactive displays. Patients enjoy the convenience of self-service at the bedside with access to meal ordering, entertainment, education, hospital services and more, while staff enjoy streamlined, paperless workflows. Interactive surveys and patient feedback help patients communicate immediate needs, and help hospitals respond to those needs quickly. The platform leverages integrations with EHRs, building management systems, food service systems, real-time location systems and more. Data analytics provide valuable insights into patient behaviors and pain points, letting hospitals improve service and outcomes. Learn more at www.evideon.com.

About Wellpepper

Wellpepper is a healthcare technology company with an award-winning and clinically validated patient engagement platform used by major health systems to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. Wellpepper treatment plans can be customized for each health system’s own protocols and best practices and personalized for each patient. Wellpepper’s patented adaptive notification system helps drive over 70 percent patient engagement with treatment plans. Wellpepper was founded in 2012 to help healthcare organizations lower costs, improve outcomes and improve patient satisfaction. The company is headquartered in Seattle, Washington. Visit www.wellpepper.comfor more information.

Full press-release available at PRWeb.

Contact:

eVideon
info@evideon.com
616-588-8109

Wellpepper
Jennifer Allen Newton
Bluehouse Consulting Group, Inc.
jennifer@bluehousecg.com
503-805-7540

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Patient Satisfaction, Press Release

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See you at HIMSS19

HIMSS19 is a couple weeks away and we have a lot to be excited for!

Stop by and see us in the Personalized Health Experience, Booth 888-96. Alongside our great partners at Ensocare, we will be showcasing our latest product updates, discussing ROI for patient engagement platforms, promoting care plans based on Mayo Clinic best practices, and sharing our vision for the future of patient engagement.

We have a long list of booths to visit and sessions to attend. Below are some of the topics that we’re particularly interested in this year:

We can’t wait to connect with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience. Hope to see you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement

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Healthcare + A.I. Northwest

The Xconomy Healthcare + A.I. Northwest Conference at Cambia Grove featured speakers and panels discussing the opportunities and prospects for applying machine learning and artificial intelligence to find solutions for health care. The consensus was that we are no longer held back by a lack of technological understanding and ability. A.I. and M.L. models can be learned at a large scale by harnessing the power of the cloud and advances in data science. According to the panelists, today’s challenges to incorporating A.I. into healthcare include abundant, but inadequate data and resistance from health systems and providers.

Many researchers have found insufficient data to be an unexpected challenge. As keynote speaker Peter Lee of Microsoft Research pointed out, the more data we have, the better our machine learned models can be. He used an analogy to a speech identifier trained on multiple languages such that the model predicted English better after learning French to illustrate that improvements can be made with large sets of unstructured data. Unfortunately, because we are not capturing enough of the right kind of data for researchers, much patient data is getting lost in the “health data funnel” due to PHI and quality concerns. Lee called for more data sharing and data transparency at every level.

Physician researchers on multiple panels were concerned about a lack of suitable data. Soheil Meshinchi, a pediatric oncologist from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, is engaged in collecting data specific to children. He discussed his research on Acute Myeloid Leukemia on the panel titled, ‘Will A.I. Help Discover and Personalize the Next Breakthrough Therapy?’. While there is a large body of research on AML in adults, he has found that the disease behaves much differently at a genomic level in children. He also expressed distrust in some published research because studies are rarely reproduced and often a researcher who presents results contrary to existing research faces headwinds at journals who are reticent to publish “negative data”. His focus at this point is gathering as much data as he can.

Matthew Thompson, a physician researcher at the University of Washington School of Medicine, argued on the “Innovations for the Over-Worked Physician” panel that technology has made patient interaction demonstrably worse, but that these problems can and should be solved innovatively with artificial intelligence. His specific complaints include both inputting and extracting data from health system EHRs, as well as an overall glut of raw patient data, often generated by the patient himself, and far too much published research for clinicians to digest.

Both keynote speakers, Microsoft’s Lee and Oren Etzioni of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, referenced the large numbers of research papers published every year. According to Etzioni, the number of scientific papers published has doubled every nine years since World War II. Lee referenced a statistic that 4000 studies on precision cancer treatments are published each year. They are both relying on innovative machine reading techniques to analyze and categorize research papers to make them more available to physicians (and other scientists). Dr. Etzioni’s team has developed SemanticScholar.org to combat the common challenges facing those who look for research papers. He aims to reduce the number of citations they must follow while also identifying the most relevant and up-to-date research available. One of the advantages of taking this approach to patient data

is that scientific texts have no PHI concerns. Lee’s team is marrying patient data and machine reading to match potential research subjects with appropriate NIH studies.

Dr. Thompson was concerned that too much data is presented to the medical staff and very few of the “predictive rules” used by ER personnel are both ‘accurate and safe’. When reviewing patient outcomes and observations to predict the severity of an infection, he found that patients or their caregivers would provide ample information, but often clinicians would disregard certain details as noise because they were atypical symptoms. The amount of data that providers have to observe for a patient is massive, but machine learned models may be utilized to distill that data into the most relevant and actionable signals.

Before data is gathered and interpreted, it must be collected. Like Dr. Thompson, Harjinder Sandhu of Saykara sees ponderous, physician-driven data entry via EHR as significant barrier to efficient data collection. Sandhu notes that healthcare is the only industry where the highest-paid teammember is performing this onerous task and his company is using artificial intelligence to ease that burden on the physician.

Once patient data has been aggregated and processed into models, the challenge is getting the information in front of providers. This requires buy-in from the health system, physician, and, occasionally, the patient and his caregivers. Mary Haggard of Providence Health and Services spoke on the “Tech Entrepreneurs Journey into Healthcare” panel and stated that the biggest problem for entrepreneurs is defining the correct problem to solve. During the “Investment Perspective” panel, Matt Holman of Echo Health Ventures recommended tech startups emphasize an understanding of the context of the problem within a health system.

One of the most important and difficult hurdles for health technology companies is working into clinical workflow. Mike McSherry from Xealth has found that physician champions who know how they want to use technology help with integrating into a health system or physicians group. Lynn McGrath of Eigen Healthcare believes physicians want their data to be defined, quick to assess, condensed, and actionable, while Shelly Fitz points out that providers are not used to all the data they are receiving and they don’t yet know how to use it all. These are all issues that can and will be solved as healthcare technology continues to become more intelligent.

As Wellpepper’s CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg pointed out, health systems and doctors are resistant to “shiny new things”, for good reason. When approaching a health system, in addition to engaging the administration, clinicians need to understand why the machine learned model is recommending a given course of treatment. After integration, patients will also want to understand why a given course of treatment is being recommended. Applying artificial intelligence solutions to medicine must take into account the human element, as well.

The exciting possibilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning are hindered more by human constraints in health systems and data collection than by available technology. “Patients are throwing off all kinds of data when they’re not in the clinic,” according to our CTO. Wellpepper’s tools for capturing patient-generated data provide a pathway for providers to access actionable analysis.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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Falls Challenge

How might we enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls? We have entered a challenge with AARP and IDEO to bring our proven falls solutions to the masses. Along side our partners at Harvard and Boston University, we believe that using mobile technology to enhance and scale a proven falls prevention program will lead to better life by increasing access to care and decreasing costs.

The challenge started with over 220 submissions and recently weeded down to the top 40. We’re thrilled to have made the first cut. Our method is proven and we invite you to participate in the next round to refine our idea and help achieve greater impact.

Click here to check out our entry!

 

 

Posted in: Aging, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Research, Uncategorized

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Exposure at a digital health startup

Physicians typically endure years of training by being put in a pressure cooker with no safety valve. They persist through sheer brute force and discipline within a highly regulated, high barrier to entry industry. The high stakes culture of medicine often lends to emotional immaturity and an inability to relate to most of the world around. Ironic and sad, given that one of the core principles in patient care is to demonstrate empathy towards the human condition. The information asymmetry that exists between patient and provider further puts more onus on the physician to have character and compassion. In addition to being out of touch with reality, physicians also grapple with the changing times. Technological advancements and accessibility of information through technology has influenced the way physicians learn and practice medicine. Physicians who are uncomfortable with technology tend to find it harder to keep up with the latest innovations and research that affects patient care.

I chose to do a rotation at a digital health startup because of the fear of being disconnected and clueless. Plus there are a few other beliefs of mine that I wanted to more fully explore during my time at Wellpepper:

  • Understanding patients in the aggregate is important. Understanding what patients want, feel, and expect is not just an interesting data set, but is essential for me in providing optimal care. While a physician still deals with a patient one on one and the experience is influenced by patient characteristics, knowing the context in where the patient is coming from provides the best chance for an optimal encounter.
  • Technology that enhances the patient-physician relationship is a top priority. The physicians I have respected the most have tier 1 communication skills and relationships with their patients. A good relationship can literally bend the physics of the situation (e.g. that’s why doctors who have good bedside manner don’t get sued).
  • Technology that promotes value based care is the current landscape. It is no longer around the corner. Every stakeholder in healthcare is interested in improvement of care from an outcomes and cost perspective. Current practices in medicine are rapidly adapting in order to keep up.
  • Betting against yourself is a great strategy for growth. Based on the culture of medicine, it has always been more important for me to implement care that is standardized and in service of saving a patient’s life rather than considering how he/she feels. Something as simple as a patient having to give five histories within the same hospital admission is normal to me and also has value due to the difficulties in eliciting accurate information. But what if I considered that a patient doesn’t want to hear the same question repeatedly and that ultimately effects his/her perception of care? What if their lives were saved but they didn’t believe that anyone truly cared for them in the hospitalization? Would this be a meaningful experience, or a shallow one sided win? Challenging the way I think, the way I was indoctrinated into thinking and behaving, is something I look forward to in this process.

In summary, I chose to do a rotation at Wellpepper because I have a growth mindset. I want to consciously be a part of the most exciting time in medicine, where the hard work of innovative and creative minds improve patient lives.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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Using AWS with HIPAA-Protected Data – A Practical Primer

When we started building the Wellpepper platform four years ago, we thought carefully about how to build for privacy and security best practices as well as HIPAA compliance, since we work with customers in the healthcare industry. We chose to build the system entirely on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and learned a few things in the process about building HIPAA compliant applications on AWS. Hopefully this will be helpful to others considering AWS as the home for their healthcare online service, whether you’re a software company hoping to sell to healthcare systems (as a “Business Associate” in HIPAA terminology) or an internal development team at a health system (a “Covered Entity”).

It’s Not Rocket Science

As you probably already know, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is made up of several parts. Usually when IT people talk about “HIPAA compliance”, they are talking about the Title II Security Rule which governs privacy and security practices for electronic protected health information (ePHI).

Many of the requirements in the HIPAA Security Rule are simply best practices for security and data privacy that have been written into law. Things like encrypting traffic travelling over a network. Anyone building good, secure software, should be following these principles anyway. You need to be informed of the requirements, and you need to make sure you establish ongoing practices for maintaining security and privacy, but it’s not rocket science. In fact, your health system (or healthcare customers) may actually have more stringent or additional data security requirements to what is required by HIPAA.

Our experience is that HIPAA isn’t a major departure from what we would have built anyway.

Stay Up To Date

HIPAA was established in 1996, with the final Security Rule being published in 2003. In some cases, the guidance has not kept up with current threats and practices in 2017. If you are developing healthcare software, you should be applying industry best practices in combination with the HIPAA requirements. Your ultimate goal needs to be protecting patient data, not just regulatory compliance. Invest in training yourself and your team and staying current. Some resources we found helpful:

Take Responsibility

Compliance usually isn’t at the top of an engineering team’s list of fun things, so it’s tempting to look for solutions that can abstract away the responsibility. There are a few online healthcare platform-as-a-service hosters that make claims in this direction. Be wary of these. No service can remove your responsibility for compliance.

We decided that using AWS infrastructure services was the best level of abstraction. This let us build new services, host data, and install 3rd party applications in our VPC with high confidence that we were living up to our promises to protect patient data.

In addition to thinking about your software solution, compliance also covers your business practices and policies for things like training, background checks, and corporate device security – securing your people. These are often overlooked areas that are really important, since security researchers complain that people are the weakest link in the security chain. As with your software design, the application of commonsense practices and good documentation will go a long way.

There is no single group that certifies systems as HIPAA compliant. However, HHS can audit you at any time, whether you’re a covered entity or a business associate. You should do your own internal assessments against the HIPAA Security Rule both when you are building new capabilities, and on an annual basis. Augment this with external third party reviews. You’ll want to be able to show summarized reports of both your internal process and a stamp of approval from an external auditor.

HHS produces a tool called the SRA tool which you might find useful in performing security rule assessments: https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/security-risk-assessment-tool. We used this for a couple years, but now just use an Excel Spreadsheet to evaluate ourselves. Bonus: this is probably what your auditor will want to see.

This Risk Toolkit from the HIPAA Collaborative of Wisconsin is a good starting point, and looks very similar to the spreadsheet we use: http://hipaacow.org/resources/hipaa-cow-documents/risk-toolkit/ (look at the Risk Assessment Template).

Share the Responsibility

AWS certifies a subset of their services for HIPAA compliance. This includes restrictions on how these services are used, and requires that you enter into a Business Associate Agreement (BAA) with AWS. This agreement establishes the legal relationship needed to handle ePHI, and ensures that you’ll be notified in the unlikely event that there is a data breach.

When you sign a BAA, you enter into a shared responsibility model with AWS to protect ePHI. AWS largely covers physical security for their facilities and networks. You can view their SOC audit results on request. You own the security for your applications and anything else from the OS on up. For example, if you use Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, it’s your responsibility to keep those instances patched.

AWS occasionally adds new services to their HIPAA-certified services, so you’ll want to check occasionally to see if there are new services you might be able to take advantage of.

Draw a Bright Line Around Your ePHI

At any time, you should be able to quickly say exactly which parts of your system (which servers, which network segments, which databases, which services) have or store ePHI. These systems are inside your bright line defense perimeter, are subject to HIPAA regulations including breach notifications. That means if you lose data on one of these systems, you need to notify your patients (or if you are a Business Associate, notify the Covered Entity so that they can notify the patients).

EC2, Simple Storage System (S3), Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), when used in accordance with guidelines can be HIPAA compliant. Make sure you read the guidelines – there are usually certain restrictions on usage in order to be covered. Many of AWS’ platform-as-a-service offerings are currently not offered under the AWS HIPAA umbrella (for example Kinesis and Lambda). You can still use these services, just not with ePHI.

Many modern systems designs make use of 3rd party framworks and SaaS offerings for things like analytics, monitoring, customer support, etc. When you are holding and conveying ePHI, you will need to be careful about which dependencies you take. For example, in one of our recent product updates we were considering using an external web & mobile analytics platform to better understand our traffic patterns. We walked through our use cases and decided that while none of them required us to send any ePHI to the analytics platform, the risk of accidentally sending some piece of protected data was too high. So we came up with a different plan that allowed us to keep PHI within our safe boundary and under our direct control. Many of your decisions will be grey-area tradeoffs like this.

Secure at Rest and Over the Wire

This is often the first question we see on any healthcare IT security review. How do you protect data at rest and over the wire? Use strong SSL certs with robust SSL termination implementations like ELB. If you terminate your own SSL connections, they need to be well patched due to evolving threats like Heartbleed, POODLE, etc. You may choose to do further application-level encryption in addition to SSL, but SSL should usually be sufficient to satisfy the over-the-wire encryption requirements.

For at-rest storage, there are many options (symmetric/asymmetric) that will depend on what you are trying to do. As a baseline, AWS makes it incredibly easy to encrypt data with AES-256 both in S3 or in the Elastic Block Store (EBS) drives attached to your EC2 instances. There’s almost no reason not to use this, even if you are using additional encryption in other layers of your architecture. AES-256 is usually the “right answer” for IT reviews. Don’t use smaller keys, don’t use outdated algorithms, and especially never try to roll your own encryption.

Good guidance in this area is easy to find:

Logging and Auditing

A key HIPAA requirement is being able to track who accessed and changed patient records and verify the validity of a record. Even if you don’t make this available through a user interface, you need to log these actions and be able to produce a report in the case of an audit or a breach. Keeping these logs in encrypted storage in S3 is a good way to do this. You’ll want to restrict who has access to read/write these audit logs as well.

In addition to automatic audit trails generated by your application-level software systems, remember to carefully keep track of business-process events like granting someone access to a system or revoking access. AWS CloudTrail can help track system changes made to AWS resources like servers, S3 buckets, etc.

Authentication

All healthcare applications will need a way to identify their users and what permissions those users have. HIPAA is not specific about authentication systems beyond being “reasonable and appropriate” (164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D)), but does require that you have good policies in place for this. Here you should follow well-established security best practices.

For starters, you should try not to build your own authentication system. In purpose-built systems, you may be able to integrate into an existing authentication system using oAuth, or SAML (or maybe something more exotic if you’re plugging into some legacy healthcare application). In patient-facing applications, you may be able to integrate with a patient portal for credentials – this is something that will probably show up on your requirements list at some point anyway. If neither of these apply, you may be able to use another identity provider like AWS’ Identity and Access Management (IAM) system to manage user credentials. We briefly tried using consumer-facing oAuth using Facebook, but quickly found that consumers are (rightly) worried about privacy and chose not to use this method.

If you find that you need to build an authentication system, be sure to follow current best practices on things like how to store passwords securely, as well as other tricky areas like password resets.

Since Wellpepper is often deployed standalone before being integrated into other back-end systems, we offer a built-in username + password authentication system. One silver lining to building this ourselves is the ability to build meaningful password complexity rules, especially for patients. Some of the traditional healthcare systems have truly draconian rules that are not only user un-friendly, but actively user-hostile. Thankfully, the best practices in this area are changing. Even the draft NIST password recommendations, updated in August 2016, trade some of the human-unfriendly parts of passwords (multiple character classes) for more easily memorable, but still secure ones (length). Also, consider the difference between health-system password requirements for clinicians with access to thousands of records and those for patients who only access a single record.

Once your users are authenticated, they will need to be authorized to access some set of resources. As with authentication, if you can delegate this responsibility to another established system, this is probably the best approach. If you are adding unique resources with unique access control rules, you will need to make sure that your authorization mechanisms are secure and auditable.

Conclusion

Creating a HIPAA-compliant service doesn’t have to be a big scary problem, but you do want to make sure you have your ducks in a row. If you’re reading this blog post (and hopefully others!), you’re off to a good start. Here are some additional resources that we found handy:

Posted in: Data Protection, Health Regulations, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Uncategorized

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Wellpepper Receives Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Healthcare Gold Award for Achievement in Digital Health

We are honored to have been named the Gold Award winner for outstanding achievement in digital health from Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care!

Thank you to our amazing team and partners!

 

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Press Release, Seattle, Uncategorized

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SEATTLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE HONORS 18 INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS AT THE 2017 LEADERS IN HEALTH CARE AWARDS

SEATTLE (March 2, 2017) – Eighteen of Washington’s most accomplished health care leaders were recognized at Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards gala March 2 at Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

“In this time of great turmoil in the health care industry, it’s more important than ever to recognize the institutions and individuals who are doing so much to make Washington state among the best places in the nation to receive health care,” said Leslie Helm, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Judges selected gold and silver award honorees in 11 categories. The awards program was supported by presenting sponsor West Monroe and supporting sponsors Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and MacDonald-Miller.

The award winners are:

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — SEATTLE GOLD: Norm Hubbard, Executive Vice President, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle SILVER: Cynthia J. Hecker, Executive Director, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — OUTSIDE SEATTLE GOLD: Preston Simmons, Chief Operating and Administrative Officer, Western Washington Market, Providence Health & Services, Everett SILVER: Bryce Helgerson, President, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL GROUP EXECUTIVE GOLD: Dr. Albert Fisk, Chief Medical Officer, The Everett Clinic, Everett

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Jeffrey Tomlin, SVP & Chief Medical and Quality Officer, EvergreenHealth, Kirkland

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Peter McGough, Medical Director, UW Neighborhood Clinics, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOLD: Pacific Medical Centers, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIGITAL HEALTH GOLD: Wellpepper, Seattle SILVER: SCI Solutions, Seattle

INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY GOLD: Navos, Seattle/Burien SILVER: Genoa, Tukwila

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GOLD: Seattle Genetics, Bothell

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL RESEARCH GOLD: Dr. Oliver Press, Acting Director, Clinical Research Division, and Acting SVP, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle SILVER: Dr. Jane Buckner, President, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle

MEDICAL GROUP PERFORMANCE (in partnership with Washington Health Alliance) GOLD: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle SILVER: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle

JUDGES’ AWARD Dr. Paul Ramsey, CEO, UW Medicine

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Read more about the Leaders in Health Care Awards 2017 at seattlebusinessmag.com.

ABOUT SEATTLE BUSINESS: Seattle Business is an award-winning monthly magazine read by thousands of business executives across the state. It delivers insight into the key people, enterprises and trends that drive business in the Pacific Northwest, providing perspective on the region’s ever-changing economic environment.

Posted in: M-health, patient engagement, Press Release

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HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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The Disneyfication or Consumerization of Healthcare

I had the privilege of participating in my second panel hosted by Curtis Kopf, Senior VP of Customer Experience at Premera, at the recent Washington State of Reform Health Policy Conference. Curtis was formerly of Alaska Airlines and is new enough to healthcare to be able to point out idiosyncrasies of healthcare, and he led the audience, my fellow panelists, Elizabeth Fleming, VP of Group Health Cooperative, Tabitha Dunn, VP of Customer Experience at Concur, and me on a rollicking discussion of who excels in customer service, how to emulate consumer organizations, and how not to emulate consumer organizations.

I enjoy panels as they afford the opportunity to evaluate my own perspective based on the insights of others usually in extremely different roles. This panel was unique as we represented payer, provider, employer, and digital health/technology: practically a cross-section of the industry.

Both over coffee prior to the panel and on the panel, we talked a lot about the influence and guiding principles of Disney as the quintessential consumer experience focused organization. Tabitha had just returned from a holiday trip with her family, and Curtis had the opportunity to attend the Disney Institute for customer service training during his time at Alaska airlines.

Before getting into the takeaways from our experiences and thinking about what to take away from Disney, we started the panel by discussing why consumerization was a topic in healthcare at all.

A number of factors have converged to drive consumer or patient-centric approach we now see in healthcare:

  • 20M newly insured people offered an opportunity that brought new players, like Walgreens, Walmart, Medical One, and Zoom+ into primary and urgent care market
  • On demand services like Uber and constant communication through messaging apps, and the ubiquity of smart phones created an expectation of healthcare on demand.
  • High-deductibles made consumers evaluate more closely how they were spending their healthcare dollars
  • Getting over the hump of initial EMR integration made physicians ask why they couldn’t have consumer-quality tools to do their jobs

Regardless of what happens with the ACA with the incoming administration, we don’t expect many of these things to change, although there may be more competition in primary care as these new players put pressure on incumbents.

How do you react when there is more competition? A customer-centric approach is a good place to start, which brings us back to Disney. As a child, I did a school project on Walt and his empire, but have to admit I didn’t know as much about them as my fellow panelists.

Here are my key takeaways from the discussion:

  • Disney is extremely consistent, which provides autonomy for their staff to make good decisions within the 4 values that Disney holds. Although you may think that the brand is the highest value, it is actually safety. A Disney cast member is allowed to break character only when safety is at risk. Consider this as you think about the healthcare experience: safety and good experience are not mutually exclusive.
  • If you’re going to try to emulate an experience from another industry, make sure you fully understand that company’s or industries core values. The that resulted when executives managed to the HCHAPS survey: Nurses were given scripts to follow rather than making decisions, which is the exact opposite of how Disney actually operates. Nurses should have been given autonomy to work within the values of the health system and the needs of the patient.
  • Disney has an entire underground operations center that supports what guests experience above ground. This supports both the safety but also the experience of the park. Curtis toured this facility while at the Disney Institute. What struck me the most about this was the realization that the hospital has no back-office. We’ve met with administrators in their offices that are converted hospital rooms. First, think how uninspiring this is for employees as an office. Second, these are usually on active hospital floors, so patients experience random water cooler conversation as they are in care.

As an outsider to healthcare, it took me a while to get used to going to the hospital to have meetings, and it still makes me uncomfortable to pass patients waiting in hospital beds in the hallway while I’m going to negotiate a contract. This lack of a “back-office” impacts patients and staff alike, and really extends to every patient interaction. The EMR is essentially back-office software. Why hospitals run their patient-facing experience from this essentially line of business technology is beyond me.

Although at Wellpepper our client is the health system, our most important user is the patient. We want to ensure that the patient experience is as good or better than any popular-patient facing applications, and represents how the patient understands their care. As a result, we are able to enable patients to participate, and self-manage, and still deliver valuable information to help the internal health system operations center be more effective, which is why I’m always happy to talk about the consumer experience in healthcare.

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, Patient Advocacy, Patient Satisfaction, Seattle

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Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards

Among many individuals and organizations leading the charge in Washington’s world-class health care industry, we are elated to be listed as a finalist in Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards. It is truly a privilege to be nominated as well as to serve as a member of Seattle’s innovative community.

We are very excited for Seattle Business’ gala awards ceremony on March 2nd.

Posted in: Seattle

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MHealth and Big Data Are Catalysts for Personalized Patient Care

Although there are many complexities wrapped around our healthcare system, Stanford University’s 2016 Medicine X Conference starts finding solutions to improving patient care by focusing on increasing patient engagement and transforming how patients are treated in the system.

Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg, who spoke at MedX in September with digital health entrepreneur and physician Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, addressed several important aspects of big data collection.

“Collecting big data is like planting trees. You need to plant the seed of the process or tooling,” says Van Snelleberg. “Over time, this matures and produces data.”

Mr. Van Snellenberg, who has collected and analyzed patient data at Wellpepper, discovered several key aspects of data collection that could improve care continuity for both patient and providers. He shared this to his MedX audience.

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“Wellpepper has already uncovered new understandings about which patients are most adherent as well as indicators of readmissions,” says Van Snellenberg. “That’s very valuable information.”

“We’ve discovered that, as you collect patient-generated data, these types of insights as well indications about the effectiveness of certain clinical protocols will be available to you. This will help allow for providers to encourage positive patient behavior,” he stated.

Mr. Van Snellenberg spoke further at an interview in October about collecting and using patient-generated data.

 

Question: What groups can benefit off the collecting of big data?

Snellenberg: Collecting patient-generated data can ultimately produce better outcomes and patient care for hospital and clinics as well as the patients themselves. The more in quantity and detail, the better it is to help produce good results. Data collection has tremendous value that can allow hospitals and clinics to learn more about their patients in between hospital visits, thereby filling in missing gaps in patient information. We also realized that collecting big data can potentially prevent complications or readmissions by identifying warning flags before the patient needs to return to the clinic.

And as mentioned, analyzing big data has provided us insights about which patients are most adherent. For example, we have found that patients with 5-7 tasks are adherent while patients with 8-10 tasks are not.

 

Q: What are some things you have discovered using patient-generated data?

MS: We were able to make observations on the patterns. We also discovered a strong linear correlation between the level of pain and difficulty of patients.

Traditionally, patient data remained in the hospital. This often left big gaps in knowledge about the patient in between hospital visits. By collecting and data in between visits to the hospital, you can discover important correlations that would not have been discoverable without data.

 

Q: What are some possible methods to collect patient data?

MS: Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, who worked in digital health, suggested several programs such as Storyvine and AugMedix.

Usually, data is collected by patients recording symptoms and experiences on a daily basis in a consistent manner and then managed afterwards. For example, patients themselves tend to keep track of their progress in diaries or using the FitBit to record the number of steps and heart rate.

 

Q: What are some of the most unique aspects about this year’s MedX?

MS: One unique aspect about the MedX Conference is that it provided more opportunities for diverse voices to be heard in addition to health professionals – including a mix of health patients, providers, and educators.

The mindset was also encouraged to change. Some of the convention’s most progressive talks on stage happened when phrases such as “How might we…” and “Everybody included” are brought up in the discussion.

The term “Everyone included” came up most often, pushing for more perspectives outside of JUST the physicians. MedX’s solution-oriented focus proves to be heading down a successful route to improving patient care in the healthcare system as well as acting as the initiative to open doors for new voices to be heard.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, patient engagement, Research, Seattle

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