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MHealth and Big Data Are Catalysts for Personalized Patient Care

Although there are many complexities wrapped around our healthcare system, Stanford University’s 2016 Medicine X Conference starts finding solutions to improving patient care by focusing on increasing patient engagement and transforming how patients are treated in the system.

Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg, who spoke at MedX in September with digital health entrepreneur and physician Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, addressed several important aspects of big data collection.

“Collecting big data is like planting trees. You need to plant the seed of the process or tooling,” says Van Snelleberg. “Over time, this matures and produces data.”

Mr. Van Snellenberg, who has collected and analyzed patient data at Wellpepper, discovered several key aspects of data collection that could improve care continuity for both patient and providers. He shared this to his MedX audience.

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“Wellpepper has already uncovered new understandings about which patients are most adherent as well as indicators of readmissions,” says Van Snellenberg. “That’s very valuable information.”

“We’ve discovered that, as you collect patient-generated data, these types of insights as well indications about the effectiveness of certain clinical protocols will be available to you. This will help allow for providers to encourage positive patient behavior,” he stated.

Mr. Van Snellenberg spoke further at an interview in October about collecting and using patient-generated data.

 

Question: What groups can benefit off the collecting of big data?

Snellenberg: Collecting patient-generated data can ultimately produce better outcomes and patient care for hospital and clinics as well as the patients themselves. The more in quantity and detail, the better it is to help produce good results. Data collection has tremendous value that can allow hospitals and clinics to learn more about their patients in between hospital visits, thereby filling in missing gaps in patient information. We also realized that collecting big data can potentially prevent complications or readmissions by identifying warning flags before the patient needs to return to the clinic.

And as mentioned, analyzing big data has provided us insights about which patients are most adherent. For example, we have found that patients with 5-7 tasks are adherent while patients with 8-10 tasks are not.

 

Q: What are some things you have discovered using patient-generated data?

MS: We were able to make observations on the patterns. We also discovered a strong linear correlation between the level of pain and difficulty of patients.

Traditionally, patient data remained in the hospital. This often left big gaps in knowledge about the patient in between hospital visits. By collecting and data in between visits to the hospital, you can discover important correlations that would not have been discoverable without data.

 

Q: What are some possible methods to collect patient data?

MS: Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, who worked in digital health, suggested several programs such as Storyvine and AugMedix.

Usually, data is collected by patients recording symptoms and experiences on a daily basis in a consistent manner and then managed afterwards. For example, patients themselves tend to keep track of their progress in diaries or using the FitBit to record the number of steps and heart rate.

 

Q: What are some of the most unique aspects about this year’s MedX?

MS: One unique aspect about the MedX Conference is that it provided more opportunities for diverse voices to be heard in addition to health professionals – including a mix of health patients, providers, and educators.

The mindset was also encouraged to change. Some of the convention’s most progressive talks on stage happened when phrases such as “How might we…” and “Everybody included” are brought up in the discussion.

The term “Everyone included” came up most often, pushing for more perspectives outside of JUST the physicians. MedX’s solution-oriented focus proves to be heading down a successful route to improving patient care in the healthcare system as well as acting as the initiative to open doors for new voices to be heard.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, patient engagement, Research, Seattle

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You Could Get Well Here: Touring Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Center for InnovationDuring the recent Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Transform Conference, attendees had the opportunity to take tours of various Mayo facilities.

I was able to tour the Center For Innovation, where we will be working periodically over the next year as part of our prize for winning the Mayo and Avia Think Big Innovation challenge, and the Center for Healthy Living. A third tour, of the new Well Living Lab was sold out before we could get tickets.

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

The Well Living Lab is a research center where the health impacts of daily living can be tested. For example, researchers expect to study the impacts of air quality or lighting in office buildings on employee health. Tour organizers told me that the paint was still drying on the center as they start the tours so I’m sure we’ll be hearing more about this innovative center in the future.

Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Tour

The Center For Innovation houses two main areas, one a clinical space where real patients and care teams can test different types of exam room configurations and equipment, and the other more like a typical software or design office. Pictures were limited in this area, so you’ll have to imagine from my descriptions.

All the walls in the clinical space are magnetic, enabling different types of room configurations on the fly. Even the artwork is affixed with magnets, so I suppose it’s possible to also test the effect of different artists as well. When medical teams work out of the CFI space, they are testing not just the patient experience but whether these new configurations make teams more productive or collaborative. The CFI has found a number of improvements to care are possible with better room configuration, and noted that clinics and exam rooms have changed very little since the 1950s.Human Centered Design

A few innovative examples include:

  • A kidney-shaped table encourages more collaboration and communication between doctors and patients
  • Separate consultation and exam rooms offer many benefits in both communication and efficiency. Patients are less stressed, more able to absorb information, and ask questions in a consultation room rather than sitting on a table in an exam room. Two physicians can share one exam room when there are two consultation rooms and therefore they can see more patients in only 1.5 times the space of a normal exam room.
  • An open plan office where all of the care team, nurses, medical assistants, schedulers can work encourages team collaboration and also empathy as each member has much better insight into what the others are doing.
    How Patients Experience Services

    How Patients Experience Services

At the CFI, we learned about projects that have recently been completed (although they were mum on work in progress), like a project to overhaul post-discharge instructions for total joint replacement. This is a hot topic lately as CMS moves to value-based bundles for reimbursing these procedures it’s even more important to manage care outside the clinic, and do to that patients need to understand what they need to do. This is a topic near and dear to our hearts at Wellpepper.

Other projects included exer-gaming for seniors, and Project Mars named as a challenge to completely reimagining the Mayo Clinic experience as though they were building a new Mayo on Mars. This experience spans pre-visit to post visit and includes patient care and the patient’s experience in the physical space.

Mayo Clinic Center for Healthy Living

The Center for Healthy Living is an impressive new facility in the middle of Mayo campus. The Center is focused on proactive and preventative experiences for people who want to take action managing their health.

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Yoga studio with a view

This may include executives who believe health and fitness is a competitive business advantage to people diagnosed as pre-diabetes who are motivated not to become diabetic, to people wanting to regain health and strength after cancer treatment. The Center takes a wholistic approach, and guests (as visitors are called) frequently book a week-long package that includes physical assessment, diet, and stress and spirituality consultations.

The living wall

The living wall

Consultations on diet include cooking classes and nutritional information including how to read labels and understand what’s really in your food.

The Center also houses a spa, which is apparently a best kept secret in Rochester. Throughout the center the design is calming, including floor to ceiling windows and a living wall, and it really feels like a place you can get well.

Clients are sent home with specialized treatment programs and recommendations to support their lifestyle changes permanently. The Center has only been open for a year, and ideally will seen clients coming back year over year for a tune up. It’s definitely a place I’d visit again.

More pictures of the Center for Healthy Living.

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The Nutrition Pantry

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Rest with a view

Rest with a view

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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