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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

Speaker(s):

Edward Dobrzykowski, PT, DPT, ATC, MHS

Janice Kuperstein, PhD

Karen Ogle, PT, DPT

Charles Workman, PT, MPT, MBA

CSM StepsThe consensus from the speakers in this session was that the changes are real, they require work on the part of healthcare providers, and that physical therapists have a great opportunity to participate. There was definitely a greater sense of urgency on this topic than in previous years at CSM, and speakers made sure the audience knew that:

“While we’re all worried about G-codes, new players like Walmart, Walgreen’s, and Google are creating entirely new models of care.”

“Patient satisfaction is not enough, we need to look at outcomes”

“Reducing length of stay is not going to be the only way to reduce costs.”

Some of the major themes of the Affordable Care Act that speakers believed impact physical therapy include:

  • Realignment of care models from management of chronic disease to preventative medicine
  • Conservative interventions preferred over surgery due to costs and outcomes
  • New payment models and reduction in visits
  • Direct access to physical therapy
  • Standardization of service
  • Accountability for services delivered
  • Outcomes measurement

All of these were seen to provide both challenges and opportunities to the profession. Similar to other sessions, opportunities in improving outcomes and decreasing costs of post acute care, and in improving discharge, and care transitions to reduce readmissions were seen as key areas where physical therapy could have a big impact, however, physical therapists needed to participate more in the process.

Presenters pointed out that homecare workers and occupational therapists are already working in health coaching positions for population health management, but physical therapists were not really serving in these roles. Given that many studies show that discharge to home is best for the patient, and also lowers costs, this is seen as a missed opportunity for physical therapists.

Full moon over Indianapolis

Full moon over Indianapolis

In order to effect change, moving to more accountability and measurement is important, for example predictor tools to score patient on risk of readmit and standardized outcome tools. By moving to these measures and recording outcomes, physical therapists will be better able to participate as part of new payment models, like bundled payments.

Considering that for the patient, function is usually the most important outcome, and physical therapists are experts in delivering a return to function, the core value equation could be applied directly to physical therapy to deliver better outcomes at lower costs.

Value = Quality x Patient satisfaction

Attendees were encouraged to ask questions during the session and feedback ranged from a hospital-based physical therapist participating in a bundled total joint replacement scenario, where the hospital was receiving 3% back from CMS due to delivering positive outcomes at a lower cost than stipulated to those in smaller or private practice wondering whether there was room for them to participate in these types of payments with hospitals, or whether they would be shut-out. This was a common theme at the conference as private practice owners questioned whether controlling costs and outcomes would mean that hospitals would bring outpatient physical therapy in-house.

Similar to other sessions, suggested that the two keys to delivering on new value-based payment models required better care collaboration among multi-disciplinary teams and standardized outcome reporting.

“Merely aligning financial incentives between providers of acute and post-acute care will not improve quality and reduce costs for episodes of care. True coordination of care is required to ensure the best possible outcomes.” Ackerly DC and Grabowski DC. Post-Acute Reform- Beyond The ACA. NEJM 2014;370(8):689-691

For outcome reporting, the question was asked if patient-reported outcomes were the new gold standard. If patient satisfaction and functional outcomes are key in the value equation, then they are.

To conclude presenters reminded participants what they can do to participate in this new world, which reflects the larger clinical, demographic, and social trends.

  • Develop strategies and tactics around population health management
  • Optimize efficiency in each practice segment
  • Build collaboration “upstream” and “downstream”
  • Position for more integration

The session did a great job of showing that the change is real, the opportunities are there, but also making attendees understand that the time is now. Our overall impression of the conference this year is that physical therapists have a great opportunity to be on the front-lines of some of this change but that they may need to move faster than in the past. Exciting times to be in patient-centered care!

Posted in: Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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Developing Exercise Self-Efficacy for Chronic Disease Patients

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Use of Mobile Health Technology to Facilitate Long-Term Engagement in Exercise in Persons with Chronic Neurological Conditions

Speaker: Robert Motl, PhD

Managing chronic neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s is not easy, and made even more difficult by conflicting research on how to treat issues. For many years it was unclear whether exercise was good or bad for people with Multiple Sclerosis: some thought that exercise increased the inflammation that is a hallmark of the disease. Recent studies have shown the opposite however and this talk was focused on how an Internet-based intervention could improve exercise self-efficacy.

Exercise, in addition to providing increased mobility, has been shown to actually decrease depression and fatigue for these patients, contradicting past beliefs. Unfortunately, many physicians don’t discuss exercise with these patients, and to go from a sedentary lifestyle to one that includes activity, especially for someone with a chronic neurological issue requires support and supervision.

The problem is widespread as only an estimated 20% of MS patients in the US are engaging in levels of physical activity that will have a positive impact, and studies show a linear decrease in activity from initial diagnosis over the course of the disease with a systematic decline in physical activity every 6 months.

Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, Source Ahmed Asim

Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, Source Ahmed Asim

When researcher Robert Motl discovered through a Microsoft-sponsored survey that people with MS were more likely than average to have Internet access (96% had access actually) he decided this would be a great way to educate on the benefits of exercise and attempt to encourage self-sufficiency. He designed an Internet-portal and telemedicine based intervention using Bandura’s techniques of social cognitive theory to effect behavior change.

People learn by observing and by doing and confidence is key for self-efficacy. To accomplish this through an online intervention the website featured personal stories and videos from people who had MS talking about how exercise made a difference for them. People need role models for behavior change and it’s important that those models are similar. The impact of these videos was that people were able to think “If they can do it, so can I.”

Patients were also able to set goals and self-monitor them and communicate in chat rooms with other people with similar situations. After the first year, the website was removed, which may seem strange, but it was done to test whether people would continue with the intervention, which they did. At this point the only support they received 1:1 video chat with a physical therapist to help them check-in and maintain goals.

The main takeaways from this session are that with the right tools and support, which do not have to be expensive, people can change a behavior and maintain self-efficacy. At Wellpepper, we have definitely seen this and hope that more studies like this enable better care through technology and through outside the clinic support.

Note that the other half of this talk explored a yet unpublished study that Boston University is doing with Wellpepper. You can get a sneak preview here, and we’ll be publishing more on this in the future.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare motivation, Outcomes

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Stroke Rehabilitation is the Poster Child for the Need for Collaborative Care

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Anne Shumway-Cook Lecture: Transforming Physical Therapy Practice for Healthcare Reform

Speaker: Pamela Duncan, PhD

Interdisciplinary teams and patient-centered care are key to the future of healthcare, and physical therapists attending this keynote of the Neurology track at APTA CSM 2015 in Indianapolis were encouraged to embrace this change. Bemoaning the lag time from research to clinical practice, Pam Duncan suggested that researchers find ways to work with interdisciplinary teams of biomechantical engineers and even private companies to bring innovation to patients faster. She started with the inspiring example of Carol Richards who received the Order of Canada for her work with the interdisciplinary team on the Stroke Network Canada, aimed at decreasing the impact of stroke across Canada.

Source @mdaware on Twitter

Source @mdaware on Twitter

Duncan then told a story to explain her passion for changing post-acute stroke care, involving a personal experience that changed the course of her career. Duncan’s mother suffered a stroke and while Duncan was trying to provide comfort in her mother’s last days, a traveling physical therapist arrived in the hospital room with a goal of getting her mother to get her mother to stand, which was apparently the clinical protocol she was assigned to do. Duncan protested and later spoke to the owner of the physical therapy company that had contracted to the hospital. He shrugged and asked her why she cared since Medicare would pay for the visit. Incensed at the waste of time and money but more furious at the way this care completely disregarded the patient’s best interests, Duncan put aside her plans for opening a private practice and focused research to improve post-acute care for stroke patients.

Translating Research to Evidence and the Humble Researcher

With the same vehemence, Duncan described how she believed that over 180 publications she’d made on the topic had done little to advance stroke care, largely due to the difficulty of translating clinical research into practice, and asked the researchers in the audience to change this by developing interdisciplinary teams, questioning all their assumptions, and thinking about the patient holistically, not just from their own discipline.

She asked researchers to be “humble researchers” referencing a column by the New York Times columnist David Brooks and not just set out to prove what they want to be true. Duncan used an example in her own research which disputed a popular belief on stroke recovery and showed that home-based exercise was more effective than treadmill-based. Duncan described herself as still having arrows in her back from that publication.

Best Practices for Stroke Recovery

After lighting a fire for the audience to think about things differently  by saying

“Take off your neuro-plasticity hat and think about patients holistically.”

Duncan continued with specific examples on how to change care. First was to understand the overall situation. 10-30% of stroke patients face permanent disability, something that is not always clear when they are released from hospital within 3-5 days of the incident. She gave an example of a patient who was discharged with care instructions and prescriptions yet when she got home she couldn’t follow them: she discovered the stroke had affected her ability to do basic calculations.

“If you asked if I had discharge instructions I would have said yes, I heard what the nurse said and I showed her I could inject my drugs, and my math deficit wasn’t diagnosed until I got home. I did the things I needed do to get discharged but wasn’t really able to cope.”

This is a clear example of how our current system fails us. It does not support the patient outside the clinic, and yet it’s so much less expensive and more comfortable for the patient to be released to home. Looking at the costs it’s clear that we need to improve home health options.

Post stroke care costs:

  • Acute inpatient care: $8,000
  • Skilled Nursing Facility: $41,000
  • Inpatient Rehab: $14,000
  • Home health: $6,000
  • Long-term care: $62,000

As Duncan put it, “Home health is a dirty word in Washington” yet this where the patient should be. She called stroke the poster child for the discontinuity of care in healthcare as 73% of post stroke readmissions are for other issues not related specifically to the heart. Duncan sees hope though, and called bundled payments the best thing to happen to stroke recovery as providers will have to collaborate across the care continuum.

She sees the benefits as:

  • Coordinated high quality care with seamless transitions
  • One primary metric for integrated care
  • Excellence based on outcomes

The message to physical therapists is that they are uniquely suited to these multi-disciplinary teams focused on patient outcomes. For patients, outcomes are measured by function. For CMS, value is measured by those functional outcomes divided by the cost and physical therapists can deliver on both.

This session was a great kick-off to the conference, which had an overall tone of embracing the changes coming in healthcare and the role of physical therapists in it. As a company providing continuity of care through digital treatment plans and connections with healthcare providers outside the clinic we were inspired to see so many people embracing this change.

Posted in: Aging, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Physical Therapy

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Translating Evidence-Based Interventions to Practice: Falls Prevention and Otago

APTA CSM 2015 Session Recap: Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change

Presenters:

Mary Altpeter, PhD

Tiffany Shubert, PhD

Clinical Support for Otago

Clinical Support for Otago

The fact that a session entitled “Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change “ ended up in the Health Administration /Policy track at APTA CSM 2015 reinforces that we have a long way to go on translating outcomes-based research into care plans. Otago is a proven and effective set of preventative exercises and care for community-dwelling yet frail adults which improves balance and prevents falls risk. It was developed in New Zealand, at the University of Otago over 14 years ago, and prescribes a set of balance and strength exercises that the patient completes independently over 12 months.

Recommended physical therapy visits to access, teach, monitor, and kick-start patient adherence are to occur over 6-8 weeks and after that patients are encouraged to self-manage, and herein lies the reason that this session is in health policy and administration: this is longer than most insurance covers, and there are not currently enough incentives for remote patient monitoring. However, according to presenter Tiffany Schubert, Otago shows an ROI of $1.25 of every dollar invested as it prevents patients from falling which results deterioration to the patient and further burden on the health system.

Barriers to implementing Otago in the US stem largely from reimbursement and the current incident-based payment model that does not facilitate managing patients over a long period of time. As a result, Otago expert and presenter Tiffany Schubert presented an abridged version that might be easier to fit into current payment models.

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

However she is also on a crusade to collect outcomes data for Otago in the US so that these barriers can be overcome as the barriers are not just reimbursement. Clinicians have preconceived notions that patients won’t adhere to plans. Tiffany challenges these misconceptions by asking “are you sure or is it your patients just don’t understand.” We’ve definitely seen this with patients we’ve interviewed: they do want to be adherent to their plans but they find out when they get home that they forgot or are confused. Otago and systems like it work well when there is remote support for the patient.

Clinical Barriers to Implementation

Clinical Barriers to Implementing Otago

Given that Otago requires a high-level of patient self-efficacy, understanding factors that impact behavior change is key in driving long-term outcomes and adherence. Hence, the second half of this presentation, from Mary Altpeter focused on strategies to help patients develop self-management skills to complete the independent part of the program. One of the big misconceptions, that we hear frequently from healthcare providers (and definitely from many of the sensor and tracker vendors), is that knowledge is sufficient to effect change. It’s not, many other factors weigh in including readiness to change and social influences. Understanding more about the patient’s own journey and the patient’s barriers and readiness to change can make a big difference in this area. Also understanding the patient’s goals is crucial and personalizing their risk of not changing their behavior.

Breaking behavior change down into stages can really help move the patient along a path. In this session, Altpeter outlined a 5 stage model to affect patient behavior.

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

Understanding that while your assessment may show that the patient is at risk for falls, the patient may not have internalized this. First step is to plant the seed of doubt while the patient is in what is called the “Pre-Contemplation” stage. You can do this by personalizing the risk.

In a falls scenario, patients are not actually worried about falls risk. This sounds counter intuitive, but patient goals are usually not functional goals they are life goals. (We can attest to this from the goals patients set in Wellpepper.) So, the patient may be worried about losing their driver’s license which might happen if they had limited mobility. This is moving to patient-centered goals from clinical goals which personalizes the risk. Find out what the patient might be afraid of losing and this can start to plant the seed of doubt that they might be at risk for falls.

During the Contemplation phase the healthcare professional can help the patient break down what it might look like to be able to embark on a program. What might be their barriers or sticking points to do so? When might they do it? This isn’t about making a plan it’s about facilitating the patient in thinking that a plan might be possible.

The next phase Preparation, occurs when the patient has demonstrated that he or she is ready to change, and this is where we can examine the nuts and bolts, breaking down what may seem like a daunting task (adhering to a program for 12 years), into something manageable. Here is where you help the come up with plans to overcome the barriers you identified. One key barrier is often fear of relapse: that is that when a patient stops doing the plan, they can’t get back on the wagon, so to speak. Making it okay to “start over” is a great way to encourage patients.

During the preparation phase you may also want to help the patient break down the program into smaller goals and manageable chunks so they can see progress during the program. Also help the patient identify rewards that will help drive their adherence. These are both important steps when helping with a large and often intangible goal.

Action is putting the plan into place. Here your main role is to support the patient, help them continue to overcome barriers, and be a cheerleader to keep them going in the case of a relapse.

The final stage is Maintenance (which includes dealing with Relapse). Pointing out the patient progress, possibly by completing another falls assessment and showing the difference is a great way to reinforce that the program worked and it’s worth continuing. Also ask the patient to remember what fears they had before the program and whether they feel that now. Simply shining a light on their own experience can help a lot here.

With an aging population, and rising health costs, translating valuable and proven research like the information in this session into clinical practice is key. Given that the average time from research to implementation is 17 years, and that Otago was invented 14 years ago, we can only hope to see widespread adoption by 2018. That’s also in-line with CMS’s new requirements for 50% of Medicare spend being for new value and outcome-based models. It’s time right?

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Exercise Physiology, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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Getting the Most Out of Your Golf Game

Ah golf. I love this game. It can be such a frustrating sport, but nothing can beat the feeling of a well struck ball or the sound of the ball hitting the green. I don’t get out nearly as often I would like, but when I do I fully enjoy what the sport provides: a solid four hours of time with good friends out in the beautiful outdoors. When I can find the time to squeeze in a round I want nothing to get in the way. So when I heard that Sitka Wellness was putting on a Golf Workshop to learn how to get the most out of your game and prevent injuries, I grabbed a friend and we went to go and check it out.

Sitka Wellness is a full-service physiotherapy and wellness clinic located in the heart of downtown Vancouver. Along with physiotherapy services, Sitka offers group Yoga and Pilates classes as well as Personal Training. The instructors work closely with the therapists to tailor programs to each individual’s needs. What we love most about Sitka, besides their integrated approach to health, is that they put on monthly community workshops that anyone can attend. They range from managing chronic pain to training for your first 10k. Anne attended a workshop on minimalist running last month.

images (1)Jason Lee, Registered Physiotherapist and TPI Certified Golf Fitness Professional started off the workshop by discussing some of the basic functional movements required to perform a golf swing such as squats, pelvic tilts and trunk rotations. Jason used the example of balancing on one leg. If you weren’t able to perform this simple movement, then you wouldn’t be able to follow through correctly by finishing with all your weight on your front leg. Flexibility, strength, coordination, balance and endurance are all important factors in maximizing your performance. A physical therapist can help you break down your movements and determine where you might need to focus your energy and improve.

60p_sc_reverse_spine

The Reverse Spine Angle. The number one cause of lower back pain in golf.

Jason then walked us through these simple recommendations for avoiding injury.

1. Improving physical conditioning before the season starts

2. Warm up before you play, minimum 15 minutes

3. Using a push cart instead of carrying your clubs

4. Engage your core before your swing

5. Rotate through the hips instead of lateral sliding during your backswing

6. Avoid excessive extension as you finish your swing

 

images

Using the foam roller in this position can help open up tight chest muscles caused by sitting at a desk all day.

Tip #4  really stood out for me. I know engaging my core is one of my weaknesses and this is where Irene Lugsdin (a Pilates instructor at Sitka) came to the rescue. Pilates is an approach to exercise that focuses on the deep stabilizing muscles of the body or the core. Irene took us through some simple exercises that would help strengthen and lengthen the spine and that would facilitate the flexibility and mobility needed to enhance our golf swings. Irene described Pilates as breath with movement and so we focused on how your breath could help you engage your core but also infuse your swing with a fluid tempo. She also explained that golf is an asymmetrical sport while Pilates is all about symmetry and balance hence the reason these two activities are an excellent combination.

I really enjoyed the workshop. Jason and Irene were both very knowledgeable and engaging speakers. It was great to be able to breakdown the golf swing and really think about the mechanics and the movements/muscles required.  My friend Carla, who came along and who is an avid golfer, was surprised to see the Physiotherapist and Pilates instructor working together. She had never imagined such collaboration between the two practices, but after attending the workshop she thought that it made absolute sense.

Sitka offers comprehensive golf swing assessments where a physiotherapist will look for any dysfunctional movement patterns that could be limiting your performance. The 1 hour golf screen includes a walk through your injury history, a series of functional movement tests as well as a swing characteristic analysis using 2D video.  Once the assessment is complete, the PT can then work with you on an exercise program focused on improving any physical deficiencies that need to addressed. They will even work with and communicate with any golf instructors or personal trainers you might be working with outside the clinic.

We have noticed that many physical therapy clinics offer screening services for golf  and other sports such as Running, Tennis, Softball/Baseball and Cycling.  Working with a Physical Therapist is an excellent way to learn how to take care of and get the most out of your body no matter what you want to do.  I know that I am excited to take my new tips and tricks to golf course. I might even have a chance at beating Carla!

Posted in: Exercise Physiology, Rehabilitation Business

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