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SEATTLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE HONORS 18 INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS AT THE 2017 LEADERS IN HEALTH CARE AWARDS

SEATTLE (March 2, 2017) – Eighteen of Washington’s most accomplished health care leaders were recognized at Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards gala March 2 at Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

“In this time of great turmoil in the health care industry, it’s more important than ever to recognize the institutions and individuals who are doing so much to make Washington state among the best places in the nation to receive health care,” said Leslie Helm, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Judges selected gold and silver award honorees in 11 categories. The awards program was supported by presenting sponsor West Monroe and supporting sponsors Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and MacDonald-Miller.

The award winners are:

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — SEATTLE GOLD: Norm Hubbard, Executive Vice President, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle SILVER: Cynthia J. Hecker, Executive Director, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — OUTSIDE SEATTLE GOLD: Preston Simmons, Chief Operating and Administrative Officer, Western Washington Market, Providence Health & Services, Everett SILVER: Bryce Helgerson, President, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL GROUP EXECUTIVE GOLD: Dr. Albert Fisk, Chief Medical Officer, The Everett Clinic, Everett

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Jeffrey Tomlin, SVP & Chief Medical and Quality Officer, EvergreenHealth, Kirkland

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Peter McGough, Medical Director, UW Neighborhood Clinics, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOLD: Pacific Medical Centers, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIGITAL HEALTH GOLD: Wellpepper, Seattle SILVER: SCI Solutions, Seattle

INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY GOLD: Navos, Seattle/Burien SILVER: Genoa, Tukwila

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GOLD: Seattle Genetics, Bothell

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL RESEARCH GOLD: Dr. Oliver Press, Acting Director, Clinical Research Division, and Acting SVP, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle SILVER: Dr. Jane Buckner, President, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle

MEDICAL GROUP PERFORMANCE (in partnership with Washington Health Alliance) GOLD: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle SILVER: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle

JUDGES’ AWARD Dr. Paul Ramsey, CEO, UW Medicine

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Read more about the Leaders in Health Care Awards 2017 at seattlebusinessmag.com.

ABOUT SEATTLE BUSINESS: Seattle Business is an award-winning monthly magazine read by thousands of business executives across the state. It delivers insight into the key people, enterprises and trends that drive business in the Pacific Northwest, providing perspective on the region’s ever-changing economic environment.

Posted in: M-health, patient engagement, Press Release

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HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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HIMSS17 Sessions of Interest

We are thrilled to attend a number of sessions at HIMSS17 with topics pertaining to Wellpepper’s Vision and Goals!

Patient Engagement

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver an engaging patient experience that helps people manage their care to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Insight from Data

Sessions that impact our ability to derive insight from data to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Clinical Experience

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver more efficient experience for existing workflows and are non-disruptive for new workflows:

 

Posted in: big data, Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement

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Our Picks for HIMSS17

himss17-exhibitor-ad-design-300x250-copyHIMSS17 is right around the corner and we at Wellpepper have a lot to be excited about! By empowering and engaging patients, deriving insight from the data we collect, and delivering new value to clinical users without major disruption to existing clinical workflows, we can continue to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. At HIMSS17, we look forward to connecting with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience.

Sessions that we look forward to:

Our CEO and co-founder, Anne Weiler, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Anne will be a featured speaker at the Venture+ Forum, where former competition winners will be sharing how their business has grown, lessons learned and plans for the future. Since being named a winner of the 2015 Venture+ Forum Pitch competition, Wellpepper has continued to bridge the gap between the patient and care team and we are excited to share our progress and vision.
  • Anne will also be presenting a session titled, Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors, which will explore the role of design-thinking in design empathetic applications to deliver remote care for seniors based on studies completed by Boston University and researchers from Harvard Medical School.

Patient engagement expert Jan Oldenburg, who was featured in our August 2016 webinar, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Jan will be presenting a session titled, The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment. This session will highlight what it takes to create a truly participatory healthcare system that incorporates patients and caregivers, using digital health technology to reinforce and support participatory frameworks.
  • Jan will also be presenting a session titled, Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections. This session will focus on how Open Notes enhance the patient’s narrative of their journey through their condition and how this both strengthens the patient-physician relationship and empowers patients to take charge of their illness and wellness.

Christopher Ross, Chief Information Officer at Mayo Clinic will be leading a session on Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT. This session will discuss how the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are having a profound impact on how insights are generated from healthcare data.

Posted in: big data, M-health, patient engagement

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Population Health and Patient Engagement: A Reckoning Is Coming

Population health and patient engagement should be best friends. To draw conclusions for population health, you need a lot of data, and patient engagement that is, patients interacting digitally with treatment plans and healthcare providers, generates a ton of data. Population health tries to analyze the general to get to the specific and identify patients at risk. Patient engagement starts with the specific patient, and with enough data recorded by those patients, can find general trends.

With patient engagement, the information is real-time. With population health it is backwards-looking. Population health has the richness of the medical teams notes and diagnosis but it is missing the patient perspective. Patient-generated data will have diagnosis if it’s part of a treatment plan prescribed by a physician, but it won’t have the full notes. A blurring of the boundaries between population health and patient engagement presents a way forward to greater insights about both individuals and groups, and can make population health actionable at the individual patient level by providing personalized instructions (with or without care managers).

However, to get to this desired end-state, we need to clear some obstacles, first of which is the idea that patient engagement generates too much data for physicians.

Yes, an individual physician does not want to see or review each data point that a true patient engagement solution generates. However, this information can be extremely interesting to the patient, especially when looking for trends to help self-manage a chronic condition so it is worth enabling patients to collect it. For example, looking at whether certain foods trigger arthritis, or whether certain activities trigger headaches. However, to draw conclusions like this, you must record a lot of data points and in real-time, and this makes physicians nervous. They have enough to do, and not enough time to do it in, so this data cannot add to that workload.

As well, patient-generated data is messy, which can be intimidating, especially in an industry that is looking for deviations from norms. The challenge with patient-generated data is that it can uncover that the long-tail is actually longer than previously thought, that there are sub-groups within previously thought to be homogeneous groups of patients with a similar condition. In the long run, this will result in medical breakthroughs and personalized medicine. In the short run this can be difficult to deal with in the current systems.

the long-tail is actually longer than previously thought

Does that mean that we shouldn’t collect patient-generated data? Not at all. Helping patients track their experiences is a great first step to self-management. Knowing whether they are following a treatment plan, and what their experiences are with that treatment plan can help healthcare systems determine the impact of their instructions outside the clinic.

Although physicians don’t want all this data, healthcare organizations both providers and payers, should want it. Other industries would kill for this type of data. Data scientists and population health managers at health systems should be clamoring for this valuable patient-generated data.

Patient-generated data is usually collected in real-time so it may be more representative of the actual current population. The benefit of real-time collection is that further exploration of the actual patient experience is possible and can be used to prevent issues from escalating. With backwards looking data whatever was going to happen has happened, so you can only use it to impact new groups of patients not current groups.Patient-Generated Data

Finally, patient-generated data is less likely to be siloed, like clinical data often is, because the patient experience is broad and often messy and crosses clinical department thresholds (or more simply, patients are usually treated for more than one issue at a time.) Being relatively new to market, patient-engagement systems are built on modern and interoperable technology which also makes accessing data for analysis easier.

So where will we end up? To our team at Wellpepper, it seems inevitable that influencing and understanding patient experience outside the clinic. If you are making decisions for an individual patient with only a few clinical touch points, this is a very thin slice, often with a specific clinician’s specialty lenses on the actual situation. While healthcare systems are currently dipping their toes in the water on collecting and analyzing this data, if they don’t embrace the whole patient, patients will vote with their feet and pocket books towards organizations that are data and technology driven.

Posted in: Adherence, big data, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement, population health

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Wellpepper’s Healthcare Christmas Wish List

santa

Dear Santa,

This year for Christmas we would like:

  • Real interoperability between EMRs and other systems so that data flows smoothly from patient to provider applications and between organizations. Make sure it comes with APIs and real reference architectures.
  • Modern, scalable, and reliable healthcare technology so CIOs and IT teams can spend more time innovating and bringing new ideas for patients and providers, and less time keeping systems up and running.
  • Patient-centered care where the goals of the patient are the most important outcomes considered. Make sure patients and providers can communicate about these goals and consider their impact on care.
  • Value-based care where cost and outcomes are evaluated to determine the right course of action. Let’s lower costs of care AND improve outcomes.
  • All people to have affordable healthcare regardless of pre-existing conditions. No one should go without healthcare.
  • When you deliver all the presents, please take away all the fax machines!

 

Thanks, Santa!

Good luck on your travels around the world on Christmas Eve.

 

Love, Wellpepper

 

PS We care about your health, so we’re leaving you an apple and some carrots for the reindeer rather than cookies this year.

Posted in: Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement

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Not Patient Engagement with Jan Oldenburg

When it comes to talking about patient engagement, nationally recognized consumer health information strategy leader Jan Oldenburg of Participatory Health Consulting chooses to delve deeper into what it means to engage patients in healthcare. With her wide range of experience, she focuses on helping organizations create and implement strategies related to patient/provider engagement and activation with a focus on digital health technology.

In this podcast, Ms. Oldenburg addresses a variety of topics ranging from shifting the healthcare mindset to utilizing digital tools to assist physicians.

Also check out more of Jan Oldenburg’s webinars: “Patient Engagement: Creating Digital Programs that Work.”

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Finding Change and Honesty at Mayo Transform Conference 2016

mayo-clinic-logoAlthough the theme of this year’s Mayo Transform conference was “Change,” it might as well have been dubbed “Honesty.”

From keynotes to breakout sessions, there was a raw sense of honesty and acceptance of the fact that change is hard, and we’ve reached a point where the evolution in healthcare doesn’t seem to be happening fast enough.

When you’re as successful as Mayo, it might be easy to brush failure under the rug – which made this session, “We Made This Thing, But It Didn’t Go as Planned. Now What?” unique. Now that some of the initial hype for digital health has died down, we are in a phase of realistic optimism where sharing both wins and misses represents a realistic way forward.

This interactive session in three parts by Steve Ommen, MD, Kelli Walvatne, and Amy Wicks unfolded a bit like a mystery. Questions were posed to the audience at each phase for our input on what might have gone right and wrong. Not surprisingly, the attentive audience proved as capable as the presenters, and some of the most valuable insights came from the audience questions.

The case study in this session was a three-year process to develop a new interface and workflow for the cardiology clinic. Dr. Ommen and the other presenters did not tip their hands to whether the project was successful or not, and we had to tease out the wins and losses that occurred during each phase.

The presenters shared stories, but did not show any artifacts of the process such as flow diagrams, screenshots, or personas. This methodology was effective because, instead of getting bogged down in critique of particular elements, we were able to see the bigger picture of challenges that could apply to any innovation or clinical change.

At the end of the session, the presenters summarized their top takeaways as:

  • Not having enough credibility and evidence

Much of the Transformation team were experts in design, but not necessarily the clinical experience for this service line. There were some misunderstandings between what could work in theory and in practice, although the team did identify areas of workflow improvement that saved time regardless of whether the technology was implemented.

  • Change fatigue (or “Agile shouldn’t be rigid”)

The team tried to use a lean or agile methodology with two-week product sprints: iterating on the design and introducing new features as well as interface changes biweekly. This pace was more than what the clinical users – especially the physicians – could handle, but the design aimed to stay true to the agile process. In this situation, the process was not flexible to the needs of the end users and possibly exacerbated the first point of lack of credibility.

  • Cultural resistance

The team lost champions because of the process. It also seemed like they may have spent too much effort convincing skeptics rather than listening to their champions. One physician in the audience wondered aloud whether the way physicians were included in the process had an outsized impact on the feedback the team received about what was working and wasn’t working. From his own experience, he noticed that a physician’s authority is often a barrier to collaboration and brainstorming.

From audience observations, it seemed like there may have been some other challenges such as:

  • Scope/Success Definition

There wasn’t a clear definition of success for the project. While the problem was identified that the current process was clunky and the technology was not adaptive and usable, not all parties had a clear understanding of what constituted success for the project.

Looking back, Dr. Ommen suggested that rather than trying to build a solution that addressed all co-morbidities, they should have chosen one that worked for the most common or “happy path” scenario. The too-broad scope and lack of alignment on goals made it challenging to conclude success.

  • Getting EPIC’ed

When the project started, the team was largely solving for usability problems created by having two instances of Cerner and one of GE used in the clinical workflow. During the course of this three-year project, Mayo made the decision to ink a deal with Epic, rendering the current problem they were solving for obsolete.

Going for a smaller win early on might have delivered value to end users before this massive shift in the underlying medical records software.

So what happened?

You can probably tell from the recap that the project was shelved. However, the team did have some wins, certainly in their understanding of how to better run a project like this in the future as well as in helping the clinical team optimize their workflow.

What should you take away?

Know your users, iterate, and move quickly to deploy quick wins – but not so quickly as to alienate your stakeholders.

Finally, ask your peers: we’re facing similar problems and can learn together.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, Research, Uncategorized

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Health Care Innovators’ Uphill Climb

The Healthcare Innovators Collaborative and Cambia Grove have joined forces to present a series of talks on our evolving healthcare challenges.

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This series was run out of University of Washington last year, and this year’s sessions, subtitled “Under the Boughs” are held at Cambia Grove – where a new Sasquatch In Residence (SIR) ensures that the patient voice is present in the conversations.

September’s session took off with Dr. Carlos A. Pellegrini, Chief Medical Officer of UW Medicine, discussing the shift to value-based care. Pellegrini defined UW’s transformation as a process with 6 key goals:

  1.  Standardization

Standardization improves efficiency and is key to reducing cost and improving outcomes. Today, surgeons performing surgery at different hospitals may have varying tasks per hospital. Patients may receive different instructions depending on which physician or department they interact with. As a result, it is difficult to compare outcomes or optimize clinical workflow without a form of standardization.

      2. Population Health Management

Using system data to anticipate patient needs before they become major problems can both improve care and lower costs.

       3. Medical Home 

Implementing the medical home model can allow providers to be more aware of all of their patients and manage them proactively in measurable groups.

       4. Clinical Technology

Better use of clinical technical systems and of technology generally will enable more efficient and proactive patient care.

Dr. Pellegrini suggested they need to identify which patient was calling and suggesting the care they needed. For example “It’s Linda Smith, and she’s due for a mammogram.”

       5. Risk Management

“The Healthy You” – Sending better information to clinicians can help keep patients healthy, such as regarding activity level for obese patients.

        6. Smart Innovation

In contrast to standardization, consider opportunities to   customize experience/treatment for patients to deliver personalized and targeted care.

Understanding and measuring outcomes is also seen as key to approaching this evolution. Still, it was pointed out that providers, payers, and patients all understand a positive outcome differently. For example, for a provider the outcome is usually functional, for a payer or employer the outcome is financial, and for the patient it is often quality of life.

Only when these three outcomes are considered at once can we have true value-based experiences.

While Dr. Pellegrini and interview Lee Huntsman lamented the fact that US healthcare is ten times as expensive as other models, like the UK’s system, at present only 3% of UW Medicine’s revenue comes from value-based models, and it costs them $200M per year to maintain EPIC.

With numbers like this, the shift to value-based care has some big uphill battles. Keep fighting the good fight everyone, we know that the burgeoning health community in Seattle and the Cambia Sasquatch will!

Posted in: Healthcare Research, Healthcare transformation, Meaningful Use, Outcomes, Patient Advocacy, Seattle

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Patients As Designers Of Their Own Health

Seattle’s grassroots healthcare community continues to gain traction with a new meetup for patient-centered design. Last week’s meeting was generously sponsored by MCG a subsidiary of Hearst Publications who are quite active in the healthcare world with content and education. The panel discussion featured Dana Lewis, a patient-maker who is active in the open source movement for diabetes care and built her own artificial pancreas, Christina Berry-White from the digital health group at Seattle Children’s, and Amy London, Innovation Specialist at Virginia Mason. The group talked about how to effectively get feedback from patients, and how patient hackers like Dana can take poor design into their own hands build tools they need, and ultimately influence large healthcare companies, in this case device manufacturers.

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Dana, Christina, and Amy, photo credit Alina Serebryany

The panel had great advice for understanding and developing products and improving processes for patients, as well as for soliciting feedback from patients. Here are a few of my takeaways.

Tips for developing products and process

  • Understand patient’s goals and desires. Often the goals of the hospital or health system are not the same as the patient’s. After meeting with a group of patient advocates one Virginia Mason surgeon realized that the only outcome that really mattered was whether the patient had a positive experience.
  • Let patients customize their views and experiences. Amy talked about a particular chart where she wanted to see the graph rising to show increasing blood sugar and another user she talked to wanted to see the graph lowering to show insulin lowering and a need for intervention. Amy was confused by this view but created her open source artificial pancreas interface to enables people to choose their own view, and the result was that people who had diabetes looked at it the same way Amy did and parent-caregivers of diabetic children wanted the second view. Which brings us to the next point–
  • Differentiate between users. Patients often have different requirements than their caregivers, whether that’s parents caring for a child or teen, or adult children caring for a parent. As well, the clinical workflow shouldn’t dictate the patient experience.
  • Get feedback early. Amy mentioned meeting with a device manufacturer who showed her an almost ready for release glucometer that was intended to fit in the pocket. She quipped “you obviously didn’t test this with women’s pockets.”

Tips for collecting feedback

  • Build it into the product. Christina from Children’s mentioned that when they switched from reams of paper to an iPad-based tool for patient on-boarding forms the physicians wanted to stop using it because it did not immediately integrate with the EMR. Luckily the tool had a feature to survey users on whether they preferred using it to paper, and the answer from parents was overwhelmingly yes. The digital health team showed these results to the physicians, and the tool stayed in place.
  • Be creative when soliciting feedback. Children’s knew from experience that parents and patients were reluctant to give them negative feedback after a lifesaving experience like an organ transplant, so they used techniques that are often used in brand market research: analogies. For example, they asked teens to describe a digital tool as a car, and found out that their tool was like a pick-up truck to them: useful but utilitarian.
  • Use patients to collect feedback. Patients are also often intimidated to provide direct feedback to healthcare professionals as they see them as authority figures. At Virginia Mason patients who have already had a successful joint replacement visit post-surgical patients to find out how they are doing, and talk about their own experiences. Patients are a lot more candid with each other, and Virginia Mason was able to benefit from understanding the questions they asked the peer ambassadors and incorporate that information into formal programs.
  • Ask the questions at the right time. If you want to understand post-operative experiences ask within a few weeks of the actual experience, not 6 months later.
  • Be aware of selection bias. Patients who volunteer for focus groups are often those who have the time and money to be able to do so. Your feedback may be skewed towards retired patients, and those who are not hourly workers. Consider how you will cast a wide net.

Lots of great advice at this event, much of which we already incorporate into our processes and products at Wellpepper, although I definitely got some new ideas and it’s great to see the community coming together to share best practices. My only disappointment with the event was that with a title of Patients as Designers, I expected to see more patients on the panel. While there was a last minute cancellation of a patient-maker, it would have been amazing to have Children’s and Virginia Mason bring one of their patient-designers to be on the panel. Maybe next time?

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Lean Healthcare, Research, Seattle

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Every Patient Has a Story

I have just returned from my first Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 (PX2016), and I’m inspired. At Wellpepper, we are focused on empowering the patient to feel ownership and accountability to participate in their healthcare journey. The Beryl Institute and their members are doing the same and it was great to connect with so many like-minded people. The PX2016 conference is just one way they bring together this community.

PX2016 is 6 years young and attended by mostly caregivers, nurses, doctors, regular people who were touched by a personal health experience and now are in the field, and patients. With only 1000 attendees, it’s possible to form relationships. There was lots of hugging, sharing, pictures and overall excitement to be in Dallas. I met several newbies and like me, they were inspired too.

The conference opened up with a real life patient story. Les, a heart attack survivor, told his story of how he was participating in a sculling exercise and went into cardiac arrest in the middle of the water. The following chain of events happened that allowed him to be standing in front of us to tell his story. A retired nurse was on board and jumped into action to do CPR (she was filling in for her friend who couldn’t make it), the bowman had his cell phone to call 911 (typically he doesn’t bring it on the boat), another rower in his own boat happened to be near the dock gate and had a key to unlock the gate (usually locked because it was 5:30AM) which allowed the paramedics to get to Les. If there was one break in that chain, Les would not be with us. He went on to share his experience about his care at UCLA Medical Center and how every touch point from the people on the boat, to paramedics, to the care team made a difference in his recovery. By this time, there was not a dry eye in the place. It was all about why we in this profession of healthcare really do want to make a difference in the patient experience.

This lead to the theme that every patient has a story. From the other keynotes to the sessions I attended, this theme was pervasive. The focus of PX 2016 is to share stories, best practices and ideas on how to bring together interactions, culture and perceptions across the continuum of care.

In the session, Removing Complexity from the Post-Acute Care Patient (one of our passions at Wellpepper), it became clear that the long term care model needs to be reinvented for simplicity. True simplicity comes from matching the patient’s experience with the patient’s expectations. As an example, The New Jewish Home is renaming its post-acute rehabilitation to The Rapid Recovering Center which supports setting a different tone for the patient and ultimately in their experience. When a patient is sent to a post-acute rehabilitation center it can suggest a long and difficult recovery. But, naming it the Rapid Recovery Center aligns with the patient’s expectation of wanting to get better as soon as possible.

Another session that hit close to Wellpepper’s core values was how University of Chicago puts family and patients first in their patient experience strategy. Enhancing Patient Experience and Engagement through Technology Innovation by Sue Murphy, RN, Executive Director- Patient Experience and Engagement Program and Dr. Alison Tothy, Associate CMO – Patient Experience and Engagement Program at University of Chicago suggest the ability to capture real-time opportunities for engaging patients in their care and in their service expectations with innovative technology and techniques can lead to overall happier patients. Such technologies like rounding, discharge call centers and interactive patient care have led to substantial outcome improvements. However, just implementing technology did not solve the patient experience challenge. A culture shift in the staff was required which inspired them focus on individualized care for each patient. Combining a culture shift with innovative technology has allowed the University of Chicago to increase patient satisfaction scores, reduce readmission rates and improve outcomes. Furthermore, leadership is engaged and excited about the power of technology to improve the patient experience.

To bring it to a close, we were inspired by another personal patient story from Kelly Corrigan. She is a New York Times best-selling author who shares her most personal stories, including her health challenges. She has had more than her share of health encounters between herself and her family. She read an excerpt from her book, The Middle Place, where her and her Dad where both diagnosed with cancer in the same year. It was a compassionate and funny rendition of when she just starting her chemotherapy sessions and her Dad came across country for support. She talked about how in the middle of crisis, magnificent can happen. She was amazed to witness how all the people around her, including herself, able to conform into the new reality – cancer. Although a happy ending for her, not so much for her father. He passed away last year. She emphasized how at the end of her father’s journey, she made a point to thank all the caregivers for they really did make a difference in a very difficult time. Then looking out at all of us in the audience at that moment, almost with a tone of authority, she challenged us to hold on to the feelings of why we went into healthcare.

For some of us, it was a personal experience. For others, it was the opportunity to make a difference. Regardless, as Kelly so eloquently put it, people want to feel as if they have been felt and be a good listener because every patient has a story.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare transformation, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Patient Engagement Goes Mainstream: 5 Observations from HIMSS 2016

A walk through the trade show floor, and a glance at some of the sessions at HIMSS, quickly indicates that patient engagement is everywhere, which is great because an empowered patient is key to improving outcomes and lowering costs of care. There is still a lot of noise in this space however, with anything from wayfinding applications to billing services being billed as patient engagement. Let me set the record straight: making sense of things that are very confusing and often poorly designed, like hospitals and healthcare billing is not patient engagement, it’s explanation. That said, there are many innovative companies and healthcare organizations who are taking patient engagement seriously.

Here are 5 impressions or things heard at HIMSS about patient engagement and the state of healthcare IT:

  1. There are a lot of solutions in this space/competition is good. While there may be companies that have joined the space because patient engagement is a hot topic, real competition shows a real need and market.
  2. Clinical workflow does not equal patient engagement. True patient engagement solutions are designed around the needs of the patient.
  3. Engagement does not equal alignment. While this was said about physicians it’s also applicable to patients. A surgical patient can’t help but be engaged, but are the patient and physician aligned on the patient’s goals.
  4. Healthcare IT is emerging from the EMR era. Meaningful use drove widespread adoption of EMRs and monopolized IT resources for the past X years. IT is now ready to take a seat at the table and proactively suggest solutions to the clinical side of the house.
  5. People are asking how a solution is different rather than why they need a solution. This is a huge shift: at our booth we spent a lot less time explaining what we do and how we do it.

We’re looking forward to what the next year will bring. It seems like we’re at the starting blocks for some real value-based implementations of patient engagement solutions.

Patient Engagement Hits The Mainstream

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement

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Did HIMSS deliver on its Charter? Transforming Health through IT

HIMSS Annual Conference
February 29-March 4, 2016

Another HIMSS has come and gone for me. I will not brag about how many times I have attended this conference, but I will brag about it being the first time with Wellpepper. Overall, the level of activity exceeded our expectations and validated the need for innovative patient engagement technologies like ours.

Being with a new company gave me a whole new perspective on the HIMSS annual event. Reflecting back, years of HIMSS events can blur together and it can seem like the same old same old. This year was different: the healthcare ecosystem is going through a profound change and the providers and payers know this. Health systems are beginning to understand that the model is moving away from a passive engagement with the patient, to a model where the patient is taking more initiative to include their own wants/needs to participate in their care delivery.

With that, comes a whole new set of demands from the patient consumer and that I believe is where HIMSS is trying to make the transformation.  For the second year, HIMSS has partnered with HX360’s Innovation Pavilion to showcase pioneering health IT solutions that are addressing these challenges. As a start-up company, we can often get lost in the maze of vendors at a large conference such as HIMSS (estimates suggest more than 1200 exhibitors). The HX360 Innovation Pavilion provides an opportunity for entrepreneurial health IT companies to shine… and that we did.

Along with this venue, HX360 sponsors an Executive Program that runs concurrent with HIMSS. These educational sessions attract leaders such as Chief Innovation Officers, Nursing Informatics Officers and Vice Presidents of Digital Health who are looking for innovative solutions from companies like Wellpepper. Because of this venue and opportunity, we were able to have meaningful conversations with IT and executives that are looking to get a head of the curve and provide innovative solutions for their patients and systems.

Upon my travels home, I felt optimistic this shift to value-based healthcare will really drive innovation and allow companies like Wellpepper to part of the conversation and solution. The future appears to be bright and full of opportunity.  It is an exciting time for both the healthcare community and the consumer.

So, did HIMSS hit their mark? In part, yes. HIMSS is making great strides to keep up with the changing landscape of healthcare. No longer is it just about the EMR, servers, networks and storage in the IT back room. It’s about patient facing solutions that provide ownership and accountability for the patient while securing that brand loyalty for the provider.

The transformation of healthcare is now. Healthcare does not take to change lightly. But, companies like Wellpepper will continue to pave the way to innovation and the industry will take notice.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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The Case for Patient Video in Doctors Visits: Take a Selfie and Call Me In the Morning

The selfie culture and our desire to photo-document every aspect of our lives has started to influence healthcare as well, and patients want to be able to record their doctors visits. The concept is so prevalent that it’s making headlines in the mainstream media.

Patients Press the Record Button, Making Doctors Squirm” from the Washington Post

Why You Should Record Your Doctor’s Visits” from Forbes.

Having a recording of a visit ensures that you don’t miss any information, and you can review it when you get home and are able to provide more attention to the topic. Much of what is said in a doctors visit is missed by patients, by some accounts between 40 and 80% is missed, and an additional half of that information is remembered incorrectly. As we learned during a course from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, often healthcare providers are not trained in making sure the message is received.

When we ask patients about their experiences, they tell us that they thought they understood the instructions but realized when they got home they really didn’t retain enough or understand enough to comply with the instructions. Patients are often intimidated by healthcare personnel, worried about wasting valuable visit time with questions, or worrying about how what their being told will impact their lives, for example, who will walk my dog when I have my hip replaced? Is it any wonder that the information isn’t landing?

Patient Record on Parking

Patient record in parking garage of major health system

When handout instructions are available, they are often forgotten by patients, or confusing. One healthcare organization we work with conducted an audit of all their patient handouts and discovered that they were at an 18th grade reading level. The recommended reading level for health information is fifth grade, and yet these instructions required a graduate degree!

Patients have a seemingly simple solution to this: record their doctors. Doctors on the other hand have been warned about PHI and HIPAA, so a common ‘workaround’ is to record patients on their own phones. Legal departments hate this because then the patient has a copy of their prescribed instructions but the health system does not. Liability aside, it doesn’t result in good care if everyone is not working off the same information.

Including patient video as part of a HIPAA compliant digital treatment plan is a great way to solve this problem. Patients have a better experience and the health system is able to keep good records.

Patient video can cueing or instructions that is unique to that patient, and they show the patient’s actual experience whether that’s in wound care, using a medical device, or physical therapy. Patients feel a greater sense of connection and accountability to care plans when they are personalized and customized.

For complex instructions like wound care, using medical devices and durable medical equipment, and physical and occupational therapy, patients feel more confident that they can repeat the exercise or instructions at home when they see video of themselves doing it.

There are so many benefits to including custom video as part of a patient’s care plan. The technology is here today, it can be delivered in a HIPAA compliant manner, and it can be stored and easily retrieved. The challenge is that while patients are ready for this, health systems aren’t and the answer is often ‘no’. The risks to the health system, if video is delivered as part of an overall digital patient treatment plan solution are low, but the potential benefits to care are large.

We’ve tracked the evolution of the ‘consumerization of IT’ through other industries. Some have said it can never happen in healthcare, but this is a great example where patients starting to push the envelope and use technology in their care. Let’s hope they are able to convince their doctors as well.

Posted in: Adherence, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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Using “Teach Back” To Decrease Patient Readmissions

Marshall McLuhan, the late Canadian philosopher, famously said both “the medium is the message” and “the medium is the massage” meaning that the delivery mechanism of information provides insight into the meaning and can also shape the meaning.

In a recent course I attended from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement on “Preventing Avoidable Readmissions” there was a lot of focus on missed messages whether between healthcare professionals or from healthcare professionals and patients. Some of these messages were missed because of the delivery mechanism, and one session in particular focused on a concept called “teach back” which was designed to ensure that the message of discharge instructions actually landed with patients.

Source: IHI.org

Source: IHI.org

Throughout the course, the same refrain was heard that improving communications between healthcare providers and to patients were key to improving health outcomes. Examples of poor or rushed communications were provided across the course and included:

  • Patients in the emergency department not knowing why they were actually admitted
  • Conflicting discharge instructions from different hospital departments
  • Rushed conversations with patients

As well, patients often interpret information differently than intended. For example, when patients are discharged they hear “better” rather than “recovering.” As well the messages often don’t land because patients are thinking ahead to the implications of the information, for example, when told of impending necessity for surgery they are thinking about needing to take time of work, or who will walk the dog.

In our work at Wellpepper, we have interviewed many patients about why they don’t adhere to treatment plan instructions, and what most of them tell us is that when hearing the instructions in the first place they felt like they understood but when they got home they realized that they didn’t. Think about this with respect to how these messages are often delivered: patient have limited time with healthcare professionals, they are often intimidated and don’t want to ask questions, and then frequently the handouts they are sent home with don’t correspond to what they thought they heard.

Thinking about how instructions are delivered to patients can help tremendously with patient understanding and follow up. The IHI course presented some practical strategies both for delivering the information and for testing patient comprehension wrapped in some specific strategies referred to as “Teach Back.”

Healthcare professionals learn many things in their studies, but information design, learning styles, and comprehension are not necessarily part of that. Understanding that people learn in different ways, that patients are often distracted by bigger life issues when you are trying to teach them, and that a patient’s ability to demonstrate what you taught them better indicates they can go home and replicate are all tools to improve patient comprehension and adherence. As well, often it is not just the patient who needs this information but also the patient’s caregiver.

The basic principles of Teach Back include:

  • Making sure that information is easy to understand. For example avoiding medical jargon, written for a 5th grade reading level, and including only the most important information.
  • Delivering the information in a way that shows the patient you care, and that the information is important. For example, taking the time to walk through the information, sitting down and looking at the patient, and using a warm and caring tone of voice.
  • Testing for understanding. Ask the patient to explain what you taught them in their own word and if appropriate to demonstrate what you taught them.

We loved this particular session as it’s in keeping with our findings that patients want to adhere to programs provided you provide them with the right tools. As well, we have been recommending a teach-back style when recording video tasks with Wellpepper. First explain the task to the patient, whether that’s physical therapy, wound care, or using an inhaler. Next have the patient demonstrate to you that they can do it. When the patient is able to show you they can do it without extra help or prompting, record the patient and make this part of the patient instructions that you send home with them.

Teach back and informational design concepts may seem like they are taking healthcare outside of a traditional realm. They may also seem like they take more time. In the short term that might be true, but in the long run you will need to spend less time with these patients as they will be self-activated, which needs to be the goal of any readmissions prevention program.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes

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Will 2015 Be the Breakout Year for M-Health?

While on the one hand, many are proclaiming 2015 to be the year that M-Health finally becomes mainstream (and certainly CMS’s announcement that they will pay $42 per month for remote care for chronic diseases helps with that), the opening day keynote at  the M-Health Summit last week at the Gaylord National Harbor Convention center, seemed to suggest we are in the trough of disillusionment.

In particular Walgreens Chief Medical Officer Harry Lieder and Partner’s Center for Connected Health Director Joseph Kvedar were pragmatic to almost pessimistic about how mobile health would be adopted by consumers, healthcare systems, and payers. While being realistic about how mobile health can help, who can benefit, and who will actually pay for it is a conversation we all need to be having, the tone of the opening day keynote was not so much about celebrating successes but shoring up the audience to continue the good fight.

Walgreens CMO, Lieder outlined four areas where he thought that M-Health could have an impact across the care continuum:

  • Health, fitness, and well-being
  • Self-diagnosis
  • Acute care
  • Chronic care

Source: M-Health Summit

He then went on to debunk the myths of the quantified-self, that is that consumers will take their health in their own hands if presented with information. He also talked about why wellness is not popular with insurers and employers: the impact of wellness programs is generally only in the long-term, for example 10-20 years, and most employers and insurers hope that any individual won’t be their problem for that long. Taking the short term approach, Lieder said there were really only two ways to have a successful m-health startup today: enable people to bill for an existing CPT code or show significant cost savings to the healthcare system in 12-18 months. This is the current reality of the healthcare system, but certainly not how we’re going to drive change. CPT codes are backward looking not about new ways of delivering care, and while ROI needs to be forthcoming, managing patients over their lives needs to be the goal of the healthcare system.

So with this grounding in the somewhat depressing realities of today’s situation, Lieder then announced that Walgreens has partnered with MDLive to offer in-store telemedicine visits. Their recognition that consumer health alone doesn’t change behavior and that patients need support prompted the introduction of this new service, Lieder said “We need people available behind the device to change behavior.” If you can’t fix the system, reinvent it! One speaker called pharmacy the “last mile” that is, the patient loses connection to the health system at the pharmacy so brining the health system to the pharmacy might be the solution.

Joseph Kvedar of Partners.org asked if 2015 would be m-health’s coming out party but said that until applications hit certain key criteria we won’t see widespread adoption. He asked that application builders make m-health apps usable, social, personalized, and with relevance to everyday life. From a patient’s perspective applications should know the patient, engage the patient on his or her terms, and empower the patient. Kvedar did not seem to think that applications had nailed these things yet, especially in the area of usability and that we don’t get this right (and soon) m-health will “go down as another tech bubble.”

Joseph Kvedar

Source: MHealth Summit

M-health has had a lot of hype, and while this keynote provided some grounding in the reality of the market today, it seemed that this might have been a better keynote for the second or third day. Day one, it would have been nice to hear some success stories. After this keynote, I attended a session where one medical researcher spent most of the time explaining how she knew better on how to build good software than anything out there. We m-health entrepreneurs definitely need to get better at telling our success stories. It seems the press to date has been too much hype and not enough clinical substance and ROI to make our case.

At Wellpepper, we predict that if m-health companies can show real clinical evidence, tell real patient stories, and find partners in the ACOs and other organizations that are passionately trying to change healthcare in this country, then 2015 really will be the breakout year for M-Health, and next year’s keynote will see us out of the trough of disillusionment and firmly into real value.

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Helping Patients Protect Their Own Personal Health Information

Last week I was leaving a meeting at a large hospital when I saw a patient record sitting on top of the payment machine in the parking garage. Incredibly this is the second time that I’ve seen documents left here. People put them down when they pull out their wallets to pay for parking and then walk away.

Patient Record on ParkingThe information the patients left behind included treatment plan instructions – so you can be pretty sure they are not doing their follow up home care – but worse than that it contained a schedule of future appointments with the patient’s name, date of birth, and social security number. Yes, you read that right: a perfect package for anyone practicing identity theft. This was all on a page that was printed directly from the EMR. The DOB and SSN were probably included on the record to verify that the information was for the correct patient, but this could be verified by asking the patient without printing it on a schedule of appointments.

So – first things first – I took the paper records back into the hospital. But afterwards it got me thinking about information protection and privacy, and in particular about the many people who still think that a paper print out is more secure than the cloud.

Although concerns about information protection and privacy are valid, many of the major HIPAA breaches of the last few years have had nothing to do with the cloud and usually are related to human error and not great security practices.

A few examples:

Good protection of patient information is important whether that information is in the cloud, on an internal computer or system, or on paper. HIPAA regulations encourage building good encrypted software, however we also need to have safeguards to protect against human error.

If patient information were in the cloud, the patient would either access the information through a secure portal, email, or application on their mobile device. He or she would then authenticate themselves to receive the information, and would not need to worry about accidentally forgetting their treatment plans sitting on a parking payment machine.

While patients expect to be able to interact with their healthcare providers through portals and mobile applications in the same way they interact with their banks, many healthcare CIOs we’ve encountered are still extremely wary of cloud-based systems. Financial services is another heavily regulated industry that has been able to successfully move to the cloud to better serve its customers.

Wellpepper is a cloud-based application, which in the healthcare world, makes us a business associate and on the hook for any breaches of patient health information. On the hook means that we need to sign a HIPAA agreement with any organization and we have liability for breaches of information. This is a job we take very seriously and we do our utmost to protect all information that flows through Wellpepper. This includes encrypting information at rest and in transit, ensuring strong passwords, and conducting audits of our system as well as making sure we are well-insured.

With Wellpepper, we provide the same level of encryption and safeguards to the patient’s own device as we do on the clinical devices. Information is not stored locally so if a device is lost or stolen there is much lower risk than in the laptop examples. Patient can do whatever they like with their own data. If I want to post my x-rays on the lamppost in-front of my house I can do that. However, that doesn’t mean that a healthcare organization should facilitate me in sharing my personal health information, which is actually significantly easier with paper-based systems than cloud based.

Yes this information would have been transferred over the Internet which could leave it open for hacking but a secure cloud system is no less, and sometimes more secure than internal IT systems which are also vulnerable. The key is to ensure that everyone in the chain, from internal IT to external partners, and finally to the providers and the patients understands the importance of protecting health data, and has the tools they need to do so, whether that’s on paper, online, or in the cloud.

Posted in: Data Protection, Health Regulations, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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