Blog

Posts Tagged patient engagement

Healthcare Transformation: Emulating Disney Is Not A Bad Idea

Last week, I had the privilege of speaking to a group of CMIOs about disruption and consumerism in healthcare. We had a lively discussion, with the two main takeaways being that having a broad digital strategy is key, and also that healthcare really needs to find its own way to delivering the things consumers want. While looking to other industries for inspiration is a good way to think about change, blindly implementing strategies without thinking about how to adapt them for your own industry is not a good path.

We started off the discussion with this quiz from Elizabeth Rosenthal, former physician and health editor of the New York Times, and author of An American Sickness. Try it for yourself: it’s fun to try to figure out which is the hospital and which is the luxury hotel. (The CMIOs got 8/12 correct. Can you beat them?)

This prompted a debate about how much environment matters to healing, and why hospitals have no “back office.” Having a calming environment can definitely promote healing, however, it wasn’t clear from some of the images presented in the quiz whether healing or luxury was the goal.

Adopting ideas from other industries without fully understanding their priorities and understand how they might differ from your goals. For example, people may complain about the Disneyfication of healthcare, and point to managing to the HCHAPS survey as driving this and other evils. However, did you know that Disney’s #1 corporate value is safety? Adopting safety as a number one organizational value in healthcare would be completely relevant and appropriate. What has happened with these hotel-like experiences is adopting the surface of what Disney stands for without understanding the core goals and objectives of the experience or of the patient, or even of what Disney is trying to achieve.

Recently I received this in the mail from UnitedHealthcare.

Much has been written about the power of hand-written notes, however, usually within business situations and often from a senior manager to a junior manager. This, however, is not a good use of a handwritten note. It’s so many kinds of wrong, and bordering on creepy, especially since I had just gone for my annual physical.

The pressure to deliver better service, and better outcomes is not going to decrease in healthcare. However, it’s easy to avoid these types of pitfalls by considering what people are really looking for. This might not be the same for all patients, but we think this sets up a good framework to approach consumerization.

In addition to thinking about how your offerings, outreach, and engagement with patients fulfills these needs, going a step further, you could try to think about which one of these is most important to each individual patient, and that’s really the crux of delivering a great patient or consumer experience.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Meaningful Use, Outcomes, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

Leave a Comment (1) →

HIMSS 2018…See you there!

HIMSS17 in Orlando was a great conference for Wellpepper. We’re looking forward to HIMSS18 in Las Vegas even more!

We have a long list of sessions to attend and booths to visit, but below are some places you’re guaranteed to find us:

Monday, March 5th

  • Hear from Tami Deangelis on how our research partners at Boston University engaged patients outside the clinic and improved outcomes using Wellpepper care plans. She is speaking at the “Remote Patient Messaging for Adherence and Engagement” session from 4:05pm-4:25pm at the Patient Engagement & Experience Summit

Tuesday, March 6th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg will be demonstrating our voice-powered scale and foot scanner, and integrated diabetes care plan at the Industry Showcase at BHI & BSN 2018 https://bhi-bsn.embs.org/2018/industry-showcase/

Wednesday, March 7th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be sharing the Wellpepper Vision and Mission at HIMSS VentureConnect http://www.himssconference.org/education/specialty-programs/venture-connect
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be joining other industry leaders to continue the conversation with CMS toward inclusion of patient engagement and outcomes tracking in the MIPS Improvement Activity for provider reimbursement

Thursday, March 8th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-4:30pm

We can’t wait to connect with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience. Hope to see you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

What Motivates You, May Not Motivate Me

At Wellpepper our goal is to empower people to be able to follow their care plans and possibly change their behavior, so we think a lot about how to motivate people. Early on when working with Terry Ellis, Director of the Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation, wanted to make sure that our messages to patients that may struggle with adherence were positive. She works with people who have Parkinson’s disease, and stressed that while they may improve symptoms they would not “get better.”

Last week I had a similar conversation with an endocrinologist about diabetes care plans. People with chronic diseases are often overwhelmed and may take a defeatist attitude to their health. Feedback and tools need to be non-judgmental and encouraging. Ideas like “compliance” and “adherence” may not be the way to look at it. Sometimes the approach should be “something is better than nothing.” And humans, not just algorithms need to decide what “good” is.

Am I good or great?

Here’s an example, non-healthcare related of algorithmic evaluation gone wrong. Rather than applauding me for being in the top tier of energy efficient homes, the City of Seattle, says I’m merely “good.” There’s no context on my “excellent” neighbors, for example are they in a newly built home compared to my 112 year old one, and no suggestions on what I might want to do to become “excellent. (Is it the 30-year old fridge?) I’m left with a feeling of hopelessness, rather than a resolve to try to get rid of that extra 2KW. Also, what does that even mean? Is 2KW a big deal?

Now imagine you’re struggling with a chronic disease. You’ve done your best, but a poorly tuned algorithm says you’re merely good, not excellent. Well, maybe what you’ve done is your excellent. This is why we enable people to set their own goals and track progress against them, and why care plans need to be personalized for each patient. It’s also why we don’t publish stats on overall adherence. Adherence for me might be 3 out of 5 days. For someone else it might be 7 days a week. It might depend on the care plan or the person.

As part of every care plan in Wellpepper, patients can set their own goals. Sometimes clinicians worry about the patient’s ability to do this. These are not functional goals, they represent what’s important to patients, like family time or events, enjoying life, and so on. We did an analysis of thousands of these patient-entered goals, and determined that it’s possible to track progress against these goals, so we rolled out a new feature that enables patients to do this.

Patient progress against patient-defined goal

Success should be defined by the patient, and outcome goals by clinicians. Motivation and measures need to be appropriate to what the patient is being treated for and their abilities. Personalization, customization, and a patient-centered approach can achieve this. To learn more, get in touch.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, patient engagement, patient-generated data

Leave a Comment (0) →

Realizing Value In Patient Engagement

Patient engagement has moved from a theory to a reality, which means that evaluation criteria as evolved as well. It also means that instead of the early pilots where innovative organizations intuitively took the leap because helping patients self-manage just made sense, for enterprise-wide deployments questions of return-on-investment, and where and how to realize value are crucial.

Our customers are realizing value in 3 key areas:

Improving patient outcomes and satisfaction. This is practically a table stakes issue. If a solution doesn’t improve outcomes and patient satisfaction, don’t deploy it. We work closely with researchers, and analyze our own data, and in a randomized clinical study conducted by Boston University’s Center for Neurorehabiltation, people with Parkinson Disease showed positive physical outcomes and 9/10 patient satisfaction. We see these high levels of patient satisfaction in studies, and in real-world patient scenarios.

“This program has empowered me, lifted my morale, renewed my hope, and given me tools. Thank you for helping me regain my life!”

Parkinson’s patient, Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation

Increasing access to care. Time is money, especially for specialists. We’ve been able to decrease follow-up visits by 10% because patients were able to self-manage. This means that the specialists had more appointments available for new patients, and were able to decrease wait times for referrals.

Decreasing and avoiding costs.  Through our automated message classifier, we’ve determined that 70% of patient messages in the system do not require a follow up. This decreases the need for unnecessary outreach to patients, while patients still stay on track. Other hard cost reductions are in the administration of patient reported outcome surveys—automating these processes deliver better completion rates, and frees your staff for more important tasks.

Possibly the most important way to decrease costs is to decrease readmissions. By analyzing patient-reported symptoms post-surgery, we are able to determine patterns that indicate a higher risk of readmission. Catching these issues early can prevent readmissions and deliver better outcomes.

You should see value in each of these three areas when deploying an enterprise-wide patient engagement solution. However, where you see the most value depends on a number of factors: 1. Your practice and reimbursement model. 2. The patient population. 3 The service line. We’ve found however, that one area of value will be the tipping point for either your organization or your patients.

For a consultation on return on investment and value of patient engagement, contact sales@wellpepper.com.

Posted in: patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

Leave a Comment (0) →

Evaluating A Patient Engagement Solution

In the past year, patient engagement has evolved past pilots to enterprise-wide deployments, and standards are emerging to evaluate patient engagement platforms. We definite patient engagement platform as a comprehensive system to enable patients to participate in their care, follow treatment plans, and get support from their care team. These patient interactions may occur outside the clinic or inside the hospital setting or clinic. What’s key is that they occur on the patient terms, and the patient device.

Here’s a checklist to get you started, and you’ll find in this check-list why your EMR will not deliver a compelling patient engagement experience.

  • Engagement: The first job of a patient engagement system, is of course, engaging patients. You should expect significantly better uptake in user interactions from a patient engagement system than from your patient portal. What percentage of patients login and use the platform? Do they show the ability to engage patients over time? Are there statistics for engagement for different patient demographics?
  • Usability: Patients are consumers, and their expectations for usability of your application are the same as for any other application on their devices. Can you deliver an experience on par with great consumer applications? Can patients of all ages and abilities use the application without help?
  • Multi-modal Interactions: This is a fancy way of saying that the system needs to support different ways of interacting with patients, for example, SMS, email, web, mobile application, and emerging technologies like voice. Can the system deliver patient interactions in ways that are appropriate for the patient and the content?

multimodal patient interactions

  • Interoperability: Your patient system will need to interface with other systems, like your EMR, scheduling, referral management, and possibly even billing systems. Interoperability needs to be built in from the initial design of the system. Does the patient engagement system have an API? Does it charge extra for application integration interfaces? If the answer to either of these is no, you don’t have an interoperable.
  • Scalability: Scalability takes two forms. Does the system help you to scale care? Can you see more patients, or see patients more efficiently because they can self-manage? Does it provide recommendations for providers and alerts that are at the right level for the interactions? The second form of scalability, is in interventions. Point solutions may address one type of intervention very well, but both patients and health systems need to manage multiple problems. Does the system scale to any type of intervention?

You’ll notice that this list does not include HIPAA compliance: that’s a given. Security and the protection of PHI are table stakes that any good system can show you before you start the rest of the evaluation.

In addition to the technical and usability criteria, your patient engagement solution needs to deliver on value. Determining value will be different for each organization, but we have some tips to help you make the case for yours.

Posted in: Adherence, patient engagement

Leave a Comment (0) →

Patient engagement and design in the art of medicine

Patient engagement is controversial for many physicians because it interferes with the traditional values that arise from the several hundred-year old guild of medicine. Per the NEJM Catalyst Insights Council, patient engagement is characterized as patients interested in participating in choices about their health care, taking ownership of those choices, and having an active role in improving their outcomes. Given the current epidemiology of chronic diseases, it is not surprising that many patients have low levels of engagement as well as health literacy. As someone who is preoccupied with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, it is difficult for me to view any problem solving from the patient’s lens; yet, I know through the literature and intuitively that how patients feel impacts their outcomes. The following are a few of the things I have learned and will work on as I improve my ability to deliver care:

  • Time = effectiveness Opinions of clinicians and leaders in patient care have determined that increased patient time with a health care team lends to increased engagement. A basic concept in human dynamics is that the mere exposure to someone over time is enough to start an unlikely relationship. Tack onto that high quality communication and understanding nuances of healthcare literacy, and you have a more engaged patient. In modern medicine, this would be accomplished through a multidisciplinary team effort. This task is challenging given the constraints of our current healthcare system. Could I increase time with patients through mobile technology? If there was an automated way for me or another care team provider to connect with patients via text or a quick phone call at specific intervals, I would be able to increase exposure and augment time.
  • Shared decision making is key Another finding of the NEJM Catalyst is that shared decision making is one of the most effective strategies in improving engagement. We learn about this academically through the interpretative model (as opposed to paternalistic, etc.) of provider-patient relations; but this is also just common sense. I like to think this gives patients a sense of control, a sense of choice in a matter, where frankly, a lot make be out of your control. We are also better able to accept the consequences of the decisions we make, rather than the ones that are placed upon us. One of the reasons that UNICEF has been effective in helping children around the world is from the core guiding principle that children inherently have rights. American political views are reflected in the current model of access, but I would like to practice medicine with the belief that patients have inherent rights. It is a slippery slope because patients’ actions can be counterproductive to their health – but my preference is still to protect patient autonomy.
  • Technology alone cannot solve the problem The concept of remote monitoring with wireless devices doesn’t appear to improve chronic disease management or outcomes. Technology alone cannot solve a dilemma in a people’s “business”. I would opt to use adaptive technologies that improve my relationship and sense of connectedness to the patient over technology that would offer mostly education or content to the patient. The idea of people taking ownership for a difficult problem is non-trivial. It requires motivation at a level that is primarily internal. How do you access that in people? In the self-help world, the most effective motivational coaches tend to elicit a hyper-emotional state in people along with placing a high premium on discipline. I think it’s logical to work on building a relationship, connecting, allowing a safe space for vulnerability, and witnessing the struggle to achieve begin from that foundation. While patient engagement is primarily a patient responsibility, I think providers have a responsibility to elicit patient activation as this directly affects outcomes.
  • Design-thinking can help When Indra Nooyi became the CEO of Pepsi, one of her top priorities was to explore her staff’s beliefs on the concept of design. She asked business executives to take photographs of anything that they believed constituted design. After such an abstract request, she noticed that not only did people not care to complete the assignment, that some had even hired professional photographers to complete the task. My interpretation of this story is that she believes that there is an artistic aspect in the most unsuspecting of transactions. According to IDEO, human-centered-design is about building a deep empathy with the people you are designing for. In the process of being inspired, ideating, and implementing, a design researcher explores the texture and what matters most to a person before execution of a solution. How is this any different from delivering empathetic, tailored care to a patient? What we do well in medicine, some of the time, is already done at a higher level of sophistication in the real world outside of our clinics and hospitals. While design-centric thinking may lead to innovations in healthcare, for the provider I think the greatest advantage is that you amplify the relationship you have with the patient and increase overall engagement.

Whether it’s the creation of something that didn’t exist before or making decisions that are influenced by intuition, everyone is at one level involved in artwork. Improving patient engagement particularly with design-centric thinking would bring more value and meaning to the art of medicine, a skill I look forward to building throughout my career.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement

Leave a Comment (0) →

Falls Challenge

How might we enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls? We have entered a challenge with AARP and IDEO to bring our proven falls solutions to the masses. Along side our partners at Harvard and Boston University, we believe that using mobile technology to enhance and scale a proven falls prevention program will lead to better life by increasing access to care and decreasing costs.

The challenge started with over 220 submissions and recently weeded down to the top 40. We’re thrilled to have made the first cut. Our method is proven and we invite you to participate in the next round to refine our idea and help achieve greater impact.

Click here to check out our entry!

 

 

Posted in: Aging, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Research, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Exposure at a digital health startup

Physicians typically endure years of training by being put in a pressure cooker with no safety valve. They persist through sheer brute force and discipline within a highly regulated, high barrier to entry industry. The high stakes culture of medicine often lends to emotional immaturity and an inability to relate to most of the world around. Ironic and sad, given that one of the core principles in patient care is to demonstrate empathy towards the human condition. The information asymmetry that exists between patient and provider further puts more onus on the physician to have character and compassion. In addition to being out of touch with reality, physicians also grapple with the changing times. Technological advancements and accessibility of information through technology has influenced the way physicians learn and practice medicine. Physicians who are uncomfortable with technology tend to find it harder to keep up with the latest innovations and research that affects patient care.

I chose to do a rotation at a digital health startup because of the fear of being disconnected and clueless. Plus there are a few other beliefs of mine that I wanted to more fully explore during my time at Wellpepper:

  • Understanding patients in the aggregate is important. Understanding what patients want, feel, and expect is not just an interesting data set, but is essential for me in providing optimal care. While a physician still deals with a patient one on one and the experience is influenced by patient characteristics, knowing the context in where the patient is coming from provides the best chance for an optimal encounter.
  • Technology that enhances the patient-physician relationship is a top priority. The physicians I have respected the most have tier 1 communication skills and relationships with their patients. A good relationship can literally bend the physics of the situation (e.g. that’s why doctors who have good bedside manner don’t get sued).
  • Technology that promotes value based care is the current landscape. It is no longer around the corner. Every stakeholder in healthcare is interested in improvement of care from an outcomes and cost perspective. Current practices in medicine are rapidly adapting in order to keep up.
  • Betting against yourself is a great strategy for growth. Based on the culture of medicine, it has always been more important for me to implement care that is standardized and in service of saving a patient’s life rather than considering how he/she feels. Something as simple as a patient having to give five histories within the same hospital admission is normal to me and also has value due to the difficulties in eliciting accurate information. But what if I considered that a patient doesn’t want to hear the same question repeatedly and that ultimately effects his/her perception of care? What if their lives were saved but they didn’t believe that anyone truly cared for them in the hospitalization? Would this be a meaningful experience, or a shallow one sided win? Challenging the way I think, the way I was indoctrinated into thinking and behaving, is something I look forward to in this process.

In summary, I chose to do a rotation at Wellpepper because I have a growth mindset. I want to consciously be a part of the most exciting time in medicine, where the hard work of innovative and creative minds improve patient lives.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

Leave a Comment (0) →

Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

Leave a Comment (0) →

Telehealth 2.0: Our picks for Orlando

File-2016-3478-2017_ATATradeshow_1920_25I am really looking forward to heading to Orlando for the American Telemedicine Conference, aka Telehealth 2.0. Seattle has been under a rain cloud this entire year, and I want to see the sun. I’m also looking forward to sharing our findings in using asynchronous mobile telehealth for remote rehabilitation with patients recovering from total joint replacement. I’ll be speaking with our colleagues from Hartford Health, Reflexion, and Miami Children’s Hospital on Sunday during the first breakout sessions. Hope to see you there!

In addition to the topics about legislation and regulations, it’s great to see these sessions on value, quality, and new treatment models. Here are some of Wellpepper’s picks for the conference.

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Now with all this great content, networking and a talk to prepare, when will I see the sun?

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Telemedicine

Leave a Comment (0) →

Wellpepper attends Episodes of Care Summit at Cambia Grove

Last week, Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler and I attended a half-day Episodes of Care Summit put on by Cambia Grove. It was great to see payers, providers and technologists come together to focus on initiatives that directly impact the patient experience. Here are some of our takeaways:

Horizon BCBS of New Jersey is an episodes of care pioneer

Focus on retroactive bundles before proactive. Episodes of care and bundled payments are often used interchangeably. An episode of care typically refers to a payment made retrospectively while a bundled payment typically refers to a payment made prospectively. Horizon BCBS of New Jersey first launched retrospective pilots in 2010 (total hip and total knee replacements). In this model, savings are shared with the physician or practice once quality benchmarks and patient experience thresholds are met and costs come in below budget. After 7 years of scale and success, Horizon is now launching more immediate, risk-based, prospective initiatives in 2017.

Drive success through quality. Horizon piloted with over 200 quality metrics with member-specific, risk-adjusted financial targets. Metrics are key in driving success. Identify 3-5 standard quality metrics and 2-4 episode-specific metrics.

Community involvement is imperative

It’s great to see continued focus on community involvement in innovation and healthcare. The Bree Collaborative is an excellent example of bringing together community and industry leaders to identify and promote strategies that directly impact patient outcomes, quality and affordability. Wellpepper firmly believes in the work that the Bree Collaborative is doing. In fact, our total joint and lumbar fusion care plans follow Bree recommendations.

The Episodes of Care Summit held breakout sessions that mapped out the ideal episode of care/bundle experience through the lens of people, process and technology. Think of people, process and technology as a three-legged table. Remove one leg and the table falls. If the three legs are not the same size, the table does not function properly. Effort needs to be allocated equally across people, processes and technology to drive behavior change. Reimbursement seemed to take a precedence in every conversation rather than the patient’s needs or the provider’s care. Until this mindset is fixed, it’s hard to focus on what healthcare is really about. Dr. Hugh Stanley, from the Bree Collaborative did an excellent job bringing the focus of the conversation back to the patient.

Memorable quotes from breakout sessions:

  • “Patients need to be at the center of episodes of care.”
  • “We need to capture patient satisfaction in real time.”
  • “I’m blown away I can get more info on a dog bed than a provider.”
  • “We need to rebuild the patient deductible and copay mindset.”
  • “The payer community has a responsibility to share information to publicize data that drives provider readiness.”
  • “Creating episodes vs bundles benefits providers and ultimately patients.”

Posted in: Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Wellpepper Receives Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Healthcare Gold Award for Achievement in Digital Health

We are honored to have been named the Gold Award winner for outstanding achievement in digital health from Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care!

Thank you to our amazing team and partners!

 

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Press Release, Seattle, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

SEATTLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE HONORS 18 INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS AT THE 2017 LEADERS IN HEALTH CARE AWARDS

SEATTLE (March 2, 2017) – Eighteen of Washington’s most accomplished health care leaders were recognized at Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards gala March 2 at Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

“In this time of great turmoil in the health care industry, it’s more important than ever to recognize the institutions and individuals who are doing so much to make Washington state among the best places in the nation to receive health care,” said Leslie Helm, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Judges selected gold and silver award honorees in 11 categories. The awards program was supported by presenting sponsor West Monroe and supporting sponsors Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and MacDonald-Miller.

The award winners are:

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — SEATTLE GOLD: Norm Hubbard, Executive Vice President, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle SILVER: Cynthia J. Hecker, Executive Director, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — OUTSIDE SEATTLE GOLD: Preston Simmons, Chief Operating and Administrative Officer, Western Washington Market, Providence Health & Services, Everett SILVER: Bryce Helgerson, President, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL GROUP EXECUTIVE GOLD: Dr. Albert Fisk, Chief Medical Officer, The Everett Clinic, Everett

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Jeffrey Tomlin, SVP & Chief Medical and Quality Officer, EvergreenHealth, Kirkland

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Peter McGough, Medical Director, UW Neighborhood Clinics, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOLD: Pacific Medical Centers, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIGITAL HEALTH GOLD: Wellpepper, Seattle SILVER: SCI Solutions, Seattle

INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY GOLD: Navos, Seattle/Burien SILVER: Genoa, Tukwila

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GOLD: Seattle Genetics, Bothell

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL RESEARCH GOLD: Dr. Oliver Press, Acting Director, Clinical Research Division, and Acting SVP, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle SILVER: Dr. Jane Buckner, President, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle

MEDICAL GROUP PERFORMANCE (in partnership with Washington Health Alliance) GOLD: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle SILVER: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle

JUDGES’ AWARD Dr. Paul Ramsey, CEO, UW Medicine

—-

Read more about the Leaders in Health Care Awards 2017 at seattlebusinessmag.com.

ABOUT SEATTLE BUSINESS: Seattle Business is an award-winning monthly magazine read by thousands of business executives across the state. It delivers insight into the key people, enterprises and trends that drive business in the Pacific Northwest, providing perspective on the region’s ever-changing economic environment.

Posted in: M-health, patient engagement, Press Release

Leave a Comment (0) →

HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

Leave a Comment (0) →

HIMSS17 Sessions of Interest

We are thrilled to attend a number of sessions at HIMSS17 with topics pertaining to Wellpepper’s Vision and Goals!

Patient Engagement

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver an engaging patient experience that helps people manage their care to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Insight from Data

Sessions that impact our ability to derive insight from data to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Clinical Experience

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver more efficient experience for existing workflows and are non-disruptive for new workflows:

 

Posted in: big data, Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement

Leave a Comment (0) →

Our Picks for HIMSS17

himss17-exhibitor-ad-design-300x250-copyHIMSS17 is right around the corner and we at Wellpepper have a lot to be excited about! By empowering and engaging patients, deriving insight from the data we collect, and delivering new value to clinical users without major disruption to existing clinical workflows, we can continue to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. At HIMSS17, we look forward to connecting with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience.

Sessions that we look forward to:

Our CEO and co-founder, Anne Weiler, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Anne will be a featured speaker at the Venture+ Forum, where former competition winners will be sharing how their business has grown, lessons learned and plans for the future. Since being named a winner of the 2015 Venture+ Forum Pitch competition, Wellpepper has continued to bridge the gap between the patient and care team and we are excited to share our progress and vision.
  • Anne will also be presenting a session titled, Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors, which will explore the role of design-thinking in design empathetic applications to deliver remote care for seniors based on studies completed by Boston University and researchers from Harvard Medical School.

Patient engagement expert Jan Oldenburg, who was featured in our August 2016 webinar, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Jan will be presenting a session titled, The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment. This session will highlight what it takes to create a truly participatory healthcare system that incorporates patients and caregivers, using digital health technology to reinforce and support participatory frameworks.
  • Jan will also be presenting a session titled, Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections. This session will focus on how Open Notes enhance the patient’s narrative of their journey through their condition and how this both strengthens the patient-physician relationship and empowers patients to take charge of their illness and wellness.

Christopher Ross, Chief Information Officer at Mayo Clinic will be leading a session on Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT. This session will discuss how the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are having a profound impact on how insights are generated from healthcare data.

Posted in: big data, M-health, patient engagement

Leave a Comment (0) →

Population Health and Patient Engagement: A Reckoning Is Coming

Population health and patient engagement should be best friends. To draw conclusions for population health, you need a lot of data, and patient engagement that is, patients interacting digitally with treatment plans and healthcare providers, generates a ton of data. Population health tries to analyze the general to get to the specific and identify patients at risk. Patient engagement starts with the specific patient, and with enough data recorded by those patients, can find general trends.

With patient engagement, the information is real-time. With population health it is backwards-looking. Population health has the richness of the medical teams notes and diagnosis but it is missing the patient perspective. Patient-generated data will have diagnosis if it’s part of a treatment plan prescribed by a physician, but it won’t have the full notes. A blurring of the boundaries between population health and patient engagement presents a way forward to greater insights about both individuals and groups, and can make population health actionable at the individual patient level by providing personalized instructions (with or without care managers).

However, to get to this desired end-state, we need to clear some obstacles, first of which is the idea that patient engagement generates too much data for physicians.

Yes, an individual physician does not want to see or review each data point that a true patient engagement solution generates. However, this information can be extremely interesting to the patient, especially when looking for trends to help self-manage a chronic condition so it is worth enabling patients to collect it. For example, looking at whether certain foods trigger arthritis, or whether certain activities trigger headaches. However, to draw conclusions like this, you must record a lot of data points and in real-time, and this makes physicians nervous. They have enough to do, and not enough time to do it in, so this data cannot add to that workload.

As well, patient-generated data is messy, which can be intimidating, especially in an industry that is looking for deviations from norms. The challenge with patient-generated data is that it can uncover that the long-tail is actually longer than previously thought, that there are sub-groups within previously thought to be homogeneous groups of patients with a similar condition. In the long run, this will result in medical breakthroughs and personalized medicine. In the short run this can be difficult to deal with in the current systems.

the long-tail is actually longer than previously thought

Does that mean that we shouldn’t collect patient-generated data? Not at all. Helping patients track their experiences is a great first step to self-management. Knowing whether they are following a treatment plan, and what their experiences are with that treatment plan can help healthcare systems determine the impact of their instructions outside the clinic.

Although physicians don’t want all this data, healthcare organizations both providers and payers, should want it. Other industries would kill for this type of data. Data scientists and population health managers at health systems should be clamoring for this valuable patient-generated data.

Patient-generated data is usually collected in real-time so it may be more representative of the actual current population. The benefit of real-time collection is that further exploration of the actual patient experience is possible and can be used to prevent issues from escalating. With backwards looking data whatever was going to happen has happened, so you can only use it to impact new groups of patients not current groups.Patient-Generated Data

Finally, patient-generated data is less likely to be siloed, like clinical data often is, because the patient experience is broad and often messy and crosses clinical department thresholds (or more simply, patients are usually treated for more than one issue at a time.) Being relatively new to market, patient-engagement systems are built on modern and interoperable technology which also makes accessing data for analysis easier.

So where will we end up? To our team at Wellpepper, it seems inevitable that influencing and understanding patient experience outside the clinic. If you are making decisions for an individual patient with only a few clinical touch points, this is a very thin slice, often with a specific clinician’s specialty lenses on the actual situation. While healthcare systems are currently dipping their toes in the water on collecting and analyzing this data, if they don’t embrace the whole patient, patients will vote with their feet and pocket books towards organizations that are data and technology driven.

Posted in: Adherence, big data, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement, population health

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 2 12
Google+