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Wellpepper Receives Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Healthcare Gold Award for Achievement in Digital Health

We are honored to have been named the Gold Award winner for outstanding achievement in digital health from Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care!

Thank you to our amazing team and partners!

 

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Press Release, Seattle, Uncategorized

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SEATTLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE HONORS 18 INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS AT THE 2017 LEADERS IN HEALTH CARE AWARDS

SEATTLE (March 2, 2017) – Eighteen of Washington’s most accomplished health care leaders were recognized at Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards gala March 2 at Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

“In this time of great turmoil in the health care industry, it’s more important than ever to recognize the institutions and individuals who are doing so much to make Washington state among the best places in the nation to receive health care,” said Leslie Helm, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Judges selected gold and silver award honorees in 11 categories. The awards program was supported by presenting sponsor West Monroe and supporting sponsors Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and MacDonald-Miller.

The award winners are:

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — SEATTLE GOLD: Norm Hubbard, Executive Vice President, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle SILVER: Cynthia J. Hecker, Executive Director, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — OUTSIDE SEATTLE GOLD: Preston Simmons, Chief Operating and Administrative Officer, Western Washington Market, Providence Health & Services, Everett SILVER: Bryce Helgerson, President, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL GROUP EXECUTIVE GOLD: Dr. Albert Fisk, Chief Medical Officer, The Everett Clinic, Everett

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Jeffrey Tomlin, SVP & Chief Medical and Quality Officer, EvergreenHealth, Kirkland

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Peter McGough, Medical Director, UW Neighborhood Clinics, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOLD: Pacific Medical Centers, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIGITAL HEALTH GOLD: Wellpepper, Seattle SILVER: SCI Solutions, Seattle

INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY GOLD: Navos, Seattle/Burien SILVER: Genoa, Tukwila

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GOLD: Seattle Genetics, Bothell

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL RESEARCH GOLD: Dr. Oliver Press, Acting Director, Clinical Research Division, and Acting SVP, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle SILVER: Dr. Jane Buckner, President, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle

MEDICAL GROUP PERFORMANCE (in partnership with Washington Health Alliance) GOLD: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle SILVER: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle

JUDGES’ AWARD Dr. Paul Ramsey, CEO, UW Medicine

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Read more about the Leaders in Health Care Awards 2017 at seattlebusinessmag.com.

ABOUT SEATTLE BUSINESS: Seattle Business is an award-winning monthly magazine read by thousands of business executives across the state. It delivers insight into the key people, enterprises and trends that drive business in the Pacific Northwest, providing perspective on the region’s ever-changing economic environment.

Posted in: M-health, patient engagement, Press Release

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HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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Our Picks for HIMSS17

himss17-exhibitor-ad-design-300x250-copyHIMSS17 is right around the corner and we at Wellpepper have a lot to be excited about! By empowering and engaging patients, deriving insight from the data we collect, and delivering new value to clinical users without major disruption to existing clinical workflows, we can continue to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. At HIMSS17, we look forward to connecting with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience.

Sessions that we look forward to:

Our CEO and co-founder, Anne Weiler, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Anne will be a featured speaker at the Venture+ Forum, where former competition winners will be sharing how their business has grown, lessons learned and plans for the future. Since being named a winner of the 2015 Venture+ Forum Pitch competition, Wellpepper has continued to bridge the gap between the patient and care team and we are excited to share our progress and vision.
  • Anne will also be presenting a session titled, Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors, which will explore the role of design-thinking in design empathetic applications to deliver remote care for seniors based on studies completed by Boston University and researchers from Harvard Medical School.

Patient engagement expert Jan Oldenburg, who was featured in our August 2016 webinar, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Jan will be presenting a session titled, The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment. This session will highlight what it takes to create a truly participatory healthcare system that incorporates patients and caregivers, using digital health technology to reinforce and support participatory frameworks.
  • Jan will also be presenting a session titled, Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections. This session will focus on how Open Notes enhance the patient’s narrative of their journey through their condition and how this both strengthens the patient-physician relationship and empowers patients to take charge of their illness and wellness.

Christopher Ross, Chief Information Officer at Mayo Clinic will be leading a session on Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT. This session will discuss how the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are having a profound impact on how insights are generated from healthcare data.

Posted in: big data, M-health, patient engagement

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Reverse Innovation: What We Can Learn From Global M-Health

Whenever possible at conferences, I try to attend at least one session that is outside my particular area of focus and expertise. While almost everything at the recent HIMSS M-Health was relevant, global health is a bit outside the target for Wellpepper right now. Attending a few sessions on M-Health got me thinking about similarities between some of these initiatives and the situation at home.

Global M-HealthWhen we started Wellpepper, we got a lot of feedback on our mobile first strategy, not all of it positive. We believe that people have an emotional connection with their mobile devices and that when people’s mobile devices ask them to do something they generally do it which is why we optimize our patient experience for mobile. Concerns were that people of lower socio-economic backgrounds or older people would not be able to use the technology.

We and other startups have found this to be untrue, and given the success of mobile programs in the developing world, it seems that this is a red herring of an argument as m-health initiatives are successful with people with widely varying literacy levels and for whom this is often their only connection with technology. Basically if people with low tech literacy can engage in their health through mobile devices in the developing world, we’re pretty sure everyone can in the US as well. In the developing world, mobile infrastructure has leapt over landline infrastructure. A similar thing has happened for lower income people in the US: they are more likely to only have Internet access through a smart phone than through a computer and home Internet connection.

The session “Innovative Content & Mobile Delivery Tools: Driving Healthcare Utilization & Coordinating Care” covered a number of private and public partnerships to bring culturally relevant and timely information health issues related to childbirth to women, caregivers, and families in Africa. There were a number of similar initiatives involving different players in different countries both not-for-profits and telecommunications companies. Rather than recapping one initiative this post is a survey of some of the learning and best practices from a few different ones.

Most projects were either focused on preventing unwanted pregnancies and also reducing child mortality. Really two sides of the same coin: making sure women and families had the information and resources they needed to care for their children. Information needed to be localized to the needs of the audiences that included mothers, mothers-to-be, midwives, and others caring for pregnant women, and their spouses. Customized content was key, for example, nutrition advice needed to address what was available in each country, and medical advice for the types of caregivers that were in the area, not always licensed medical professionals.

While the projects were shown to work, sustainability was key. There needed to be benefits to the telecommunciations companies that were providing free texting between expectant and new mothers and providers, and access to video content. There are definitely benefits for the telecommunications companies, which included:

  • Customer loyalty. By supporting women and families in this crucial time, the telcos were able to let them know that they would be with them through thick and thin and supporting them in important life events.
  • While the phones were provided for this particular educational program, people started using them for other activities which provided a revenue stream for the telecommunication companies.
  • Lack of churn. Many women were repeat users of the program when they had their second child.

Content for Global M-HealthChallenges of the programs mostly revolved around content. Creating and managing content was a big cost for the non-profits involved. Video content was seen to be best as it didn’t require a high-level of literacy, but keeping content both culturally-relevant and up-to-date was a challenge. As a result, one organization provides a free content library for front-line health workers.

In addition to the similarities of access to information, the content problem is also one we see here. However, the difference is an abundance of content for patient treatment plans. Each organization has their own content and best practices. During the session, I thought that donating care plans and instructions to some of these not-for-profit might be an interesting way to solve this problem, collect more feedback on care plans and accessibility, as well as give back.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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Postcards from HIMSS M-Health 2015

HIMSS M-HealthIt’s been a busy couple of weeks at Wellpepper with both the AAKHS annual conference and HIMSS M-Health Summit at the Gaylord Convention Center in National Harbor where Wellpepper was honored to have won the Venture+ Pitch along with CirrusMD. This was our second year attending the conference and we noticed that the hype for digital health is a bit lower and perhaps that represents market maturity. It could also be that organizations are in the thick of implementation and don’t have the success stories to tell yet. We believe in digital health and are rolling up our sleeves so will take this feeling that we are moving to incremental change as a positive sign.

Venture+: The Market Is Maturing

We participated in the Venture+ Pitch last year as well which was won by fellow our fellow Springboard Alumna Prima-Temp. Prima-Temp was the clear winner last year, already raising their Series B. However, there were a ton of startups with only an idea. This year the criteria was that startups have revenue before applying, and the competition was held in two parts, the first an invitation-only session where 11 startups pitched and panelists talked about the market opportunity in general, and then a final round with 4 excellent startups and really tough questions from the judges. We were a bit earlier on our journey than a couple of the other startups in the final pitch so were honored to be recognized along with CirrusMD.Clinic of the Past and Present

Interestingly the startup area on the tradeshow floor was almost entirely made up of a new class of startups. So, while the market for M-Health may be maturing somewhat, there are still new entrants attracted by the promise of disruption.

Incremental Progress and Show Me The Evidence

I was only able to attend Day 1 Keynotes, and I heard that the Day 2 keynotes were great, especially by Shahram Ebadollahi of IBM Watson Healthcare. On Day 1, with the exception of an excellent presentation from Dr. Wood from Mayo Center for Innovation (disclosure: as part of winning the Mayo ThinkBig challenge we have the opportunity to work with CFI for the next year), most of the presentations were quite low-key. The main problem was the voice of the patient was missing: the focus was on initiatives or technology. I timed it. 1.5 hours into the keynote and we heard the first end-user story, and it wasn’t really a patient, it was a blind runner who used FitBit.

Dr. Wood shook everyone out of complacency and called out for a faster adoption of healthcare innovation, pointing out how basic things like patient treatment rooms have not changed dramatically in the last 50 years. He asked the audience to consider going beyond patient-reported outcomes and consider the outcomes that matter to patients. What would the system look like if we paid for health rather than healthcare, and we paid based on people being able to reach their own self-defined goals? Digital health is an enabler of this new system, but really, it’s about taking a patient or people-centered approach to health and to care.

What Patients WantAgain, maybe it’s a sign of market maturity, but the conference this year seemed more evolutionary rather than revolutionary. Themes from previous years were expanded on. For example, Judy Murphy of IBM talked about how consumer expectations expectations are fueling demand for m-health. People expect the same level of transparent and always available technology to manage their healthcare as they get from any other consumer experience.

HoneyBee and IPSOs announced the launch of the Global M-Health Survey which also pointed to ubiquity and consumer expectations and desire for M-Health. (The final survey results will be available in Q1.)

In a number of sessions Apple Research Kit was heralded as a major breakthrough for clinical trials. While the speed with which Research Kit was able to sign up study participants is certainly turning traditional research recruits on its head, the same limitations are still there: no HIPAA-compliant server infrastructure and selection-bias for those with more expensive devices. Interestingly, one of the greatest benefits for researchers seems to be the standardization of the informed consent process. (Note that Duke University will be open-sourcing the platform infrastructure they built in recognition that not all organizations have the skills and resources to build something like that.)

Interesting, how what was deemed such a major innovation at the time of release (less than a year ago), also seems a bit incremental. Again, we will take the glass-half full approach and say that we are reaching a market maturity where the gains are more incremental, although at next year’s conference we would really like to see more clinically-validated mobile health applications, and also more patient stories, preferably told by the patients themselves.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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The Future of Mobile Healthcare is Like a Warm Marshmallow

As we look towards a new year, we thought it was time for a few predictions:

  • Patient satisfaction will be the most important focus of the Triple Aim
  • Patient reported outcomes will be combined with full-body scanning for key signs
  • Emotional health will be as important as physical health, and mobile health companions will focus on both
  • The standard 10-point pain measurement scale will still be in active use
  • Mobile healthcare will move on its own, and even fly

Big Hero 6 logoHow do we know this? Big Hero 6: Disney’s treatise on the future of healthcare delivered by robots. Okay, maybe it’s about the bond between brothers and how ordinary brilliant scientists can become superheroes but given that one of the main characters, Baymax is a personal health companion, we believe Disney is also trying to tell us something about the future of healthcare.

Baymax is a huggable robot and personal health companion who can scan, diagnose, and treat humans and cannot be ‘turned off” until his patient is “fully satisfied with his or her care.” Baymax takes the patient satisfaction pillar of Triple Aim to the extreme. He can also do kung-fu, packs a mean punch, and can fly.

Baymax: I fail to see how flying makes me a better healthcare companion.

Hiro Hamada: I fail to see, how you fail to see that it’s awesome!

Baymax is activated when he hears someone say “ow” and uses a standard 10-point pain scale to first identify problems. Given his ability to review vital signs by scanning, we have to assume he’s asking this question for the emotional benefit of patient rather than a real data point.

Baymax: Hello. I am Baymax, your personal healthcare companion. I heard the sound of distress, what is the problem? On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate your pain?

Baymax Big Hero 6

Like a futuristic country doctor, Baymax understands that a patient’s health and well-being is affected by his or her emotions. At one point he tells his young charge:

Baymax: “It is all right to cry, crying is a natural response to pain.”

While he is only activated in response to injury, once Baymax is caring for a patient, he anticipates future issues, and is aware of what’s happening before the patient.

Baymax: “You have sustained no injuries. However, your hormone and neurotransmitter levels indicate that you are experiencing mood swings, common in adolescence. Diagnosis: puberty.”

He is also prepared for health emergencies.

Baymax: “My hands are equipped with defibrillators. Clear!”

Unfortunately, in this situation, the patient was using a figure of speech about having a heart attack, and this is one central problem with this future mobile health: Baymax is naïve and doesn’t understand human emotion. As well, in his desire to help he asks his young patient if certain activities will make him feel better even though they are potentially ill-advised. Baymax 2.0 will need to have some situational learning skills and not confuse patient satisfaction with the “customer is always right” motto.

However, like a real healthcare provider, Baxmax has taken an oath not to hurt humans and he fuBaymax hug Big Hero 6lfils this to the best of his ability, even when the humans try to get him to do otherwise.

So what is Disney trying to tell us about the future of mobile health? Based on the example of Baymax, we’d say in the future it needs to be:

  • With you when you need it
  • Focused on the needs of the patient
  • Summoned by the patient
  • Comprehensive
  • Focused on patient satisfaction
  • Huggable

The last one can’t be underestimated. One of the great appeals of Baymax besides his childlike naivety, is that he looks like a giant marshmallow. Mobile health needs to be patient-friendly and approachable. People don’t like to be reminded that they are sick and medical apps with medical names too often do this. For us at Wellpepper, we have a dog as our logo for this reason. We want to be approachable, friendly, and supportive to patients. We’re going to be with them on their mobile devices so they’d better want to have us there with them, just as Hiro has Baymax.

Happy Holidays from all of us at Wellpepper! All the best for 2015.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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Will 2015 Be the Breakout Year for M-Health?

While on the one hand, many are proclaiming 2015 to be the year that M-Health finally becomes mainstream (and certainly CMS’s announcement that they will pay $42 per month for remote care for chronic diseases helps with that), the opening day keynote at  the M-Health Summit last week at the Gaylord National Harbor Convention center, seemed to suggest we are in the trough of disillusionment.

In particular Walgreens Chief Medical Officer Harry Lieder and Partner’s Center for Connected Health Director Joseph Kvedar were pragmatic to almost pessimistic about how mobile health would be adopted by consumers, healthcare systems, and payers. While being realistic about how mobile health can help, who can benefit, and who will actually pay for it is a conversation we all need to be having, the tone of the opening day keynote was not so much about celebrating successes but shoring up the audience to continue the good fight.

Walgreens CMO, Lieder outlined four areas where he thought that M-Health could have an impact across the care continuum:

  • Health, fitness, and well-being
  • Self-diagnosis
  • Acute care
  • Chronic care

Source: M-Health Summit

He then went on to debunk the myths of the quantified-self, that is that consumers will take their health in their own hands if presented with information. He also talked about why wellness is not popular with insurers and employers: the impact of wellness programs is generally only in the long-term, for example 10-20 years, and most employers and insurers hope that any individual won’t be their problem for that long. Taking the short term approach, Lieder said there were really only two ways to have a successful m-health startup today: enable people to bill for an existing CPT code or show significant cost savings to the healthcare system in 12-18 months. This is the current reality of the healthcare system, but certainly not how we’re going to drive change. CPT codes are backward looking not about new ways of delivering care, and while ROI needs to be forthcoming, managing patients over their lives needs to be the goal of the healthcare system.

So with this grounding in the somewhat depressing realities of today’s situation, Lieder then announced that Walgreens has partnered with MDLive to offer in-store telemedicine visits. Their recognition that consumer health alone doesn’t change behavior and that patients need support prompted the introduction of this new service, Lieder said “We need people available behind the device to change behavior.” If you can’t fix the system, reinvent it! One speaker called pharmacy the “last mile” that is, the patient loses connection to the health system at the pharmacy so brining the health system to the pharmacy might be the solution.

Joseph Kvedar of Partners.org asked if 2015 would be m-health’s coming out party but said that until applications hit certain key criteria we won’t see widespread adoption. He asked that application builders make m-health apps usable, social, personalized, and with relevance to everyday life. From a patient’s perspective applications should know the patient, engage the patient on his or her terms, and empower the patient. Kvedar did not seem to think that applications had nailed these things yet, especially in the area of usability and that we don’t get this right (and soon) m-health will “go down as another tech bubble.”

Joseph Kvedar

Source: MHealth Summit

M-health has had a lot of hype, and while this keynote provided some grounding in the reality of the market today, it seemed that this might have been a better keynote for the second or third day. Day one, it would have been nice to hear some success stories. After this keynote, I attended a session where one medical researcher spent most of the time explaining how she knew better on how to build good software than anything out there. We m-health entrepreneurs definitely need to get better at telling our success stories. It seems the press to date has been too much hype and not enough clinical substance and ROI to make our case.

At Wellpepper, we predict that if m-health companies can show real clinical evidence, tell real patient stories, and find partners in the ACOs and other organizations that are passionately trying to change healthcare in this country, then 2015 really will be the breakout year for M-Health, and next year’s keynote will see us out of the trough of disillusionment and firmly into real value.

Posted in: Uncategorized

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Wellpepper’s Top Health Tech Stories of 2013

It’s the time of year to reflect and make lists! It’s been a great year for Wellpepper: our first full year in business. We’ve enjoyed bringing new features to our users and learning more about the needs of both patients and healthcare providers. We’re committed to building useful tools that patients and providers love to use. We’ve been inspired at conferences meeting with end-users, hospital administrators, and other startups who share the same mission of changing how patients and providers engage around their health. We’ve experienced the power of social media, met new friends through Twitter, and learned so much from Tweetchats. As a young company, it’s been a year of firsts for us that, while monumental for us, pale in comparison with the changes going on in health IT, so rather than telling you more about us, let’s talk about the year in Health Tech.

There is no scientific basis to this list, just what we think stands out from the year in Health Tech.

Healthcare.gov

The beleaguered website was definitely the top Health IT story of the year. At Wellpepper we were unable to make it through the registration process ourselves, and ended up going to a broker to find out our healthcare options. As the news came out on why the site was so bad, it was pretty obvious there was a lack of accountability and no project management. It’s really unfortunate that the Affordable Care Act was mired in this mess of an implementation, but we’re very excited that former Microsoft exec Kurt DelBene is taking the reins. Ship It!

Quantified-Self Hits the Mainstream

tec-gift-guide-fitness-trackers.jpeg-1280x960Or, “everyone is tracking.” The mainstream press started writing about fitness gadgets and our Facebook feeds were full of friends who got new FitBits for Christmas. Not sure what this means about the trend though. We have found the FitBit to be really interesting to calibrate activities, for example, a game of Ultimate Frisbee but after you know how inactive or active you are do you really need to track? And do you become okay with your activity or lack thereof?

Meaningful Use Phase Delayed

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid have delayed the deadlines for implementing Meaningful Use Stage 2. Stage 2 will be extended through 2016 and Stage 3 won’t begin until at least fiscal year 2017 for hospitals. Meaningful Use Stage 2 focuses on patient engagement, which is very minimally defined as patients interacting with healthcare information electronically. We’ve always said that electronic medical records vendors are not the best equipped to deliver tools that patients (ie consumers) want to use, so it’s not surprising that healthcare providers are struggling with this phase. That said, m-health is poised to deliver on these requirements.Wellpepper2-1195a

M-Health Comes of Age

While we can definitely debate where we are in the m-health hype cycle, there is no question that M-Health is a formidable category. The FDA is now monitoring and releasing guidelines, albeit with little clarification. Eric Topol made headlines by using an iPhone EKG on a plane to diagnose a heart attack and and advise the captain to make an emergency landing. Most positively, we’re hearing less talk of ‘apps’, and more talk of integrating mobile health into the overall patient experience and the official hospital records.

23andMe Ignores FDA

Source: Wikipedia commons

You might consider this one to be a bit specific, but it’s representative of a number of key stories in 2013: big data, the explosion of healthcare investing, and the dramatic gulf between current Health IT and other technologies, and between Silicon Valley and the FDA. 23andMe, which does cheap DNA testing, direct to consumer, was forced to stop providing genetic results and only include ancestry after effectively ignoring FDA warnings for over a year. Speculation is that they were trying to get to a million tests (they are at about 500K) so that they could prove their tests were valid and thereby circumvent long FDA approval processes. Those on the side of the FDA saw this as Silicon Valley thumbing their nose at patient safety and regulations. Those on the side of 23andMe saw this as tech disruption at its purest. As recipients of some of the last full genetic and ancestry tests before the shut-down, expect more from us on this topic. 😉

This one is not healthtech, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention the focus on costs of care. Time Magazine, and the New York Times both published rather scathing interactive features on the costs of healthcare in the US. One of Reddit’s top threads right now is about a $50,000 appendectomy. It’s great to see these issues called to light. Let’s hope we see progress in solving them in 2014.


NewYearWP

We’re pretty excited to see what 2014 brings Wellpepper and what new innovations, disruptions, and improvements are brought to the healthcare industry as a whole. Best to you and yours from all of us at Wellpepper!

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health

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