Blog

Posts Tagged innovation

Simple Patient-Centered Design

At Wellpepper, we work hard to make sure our software is intuitive, including working with external academic researchers on randomized control trials for people who may have cognitive or other disabilities. This is both to make sure our software is easy-to-use for all abilities, and to overcome a frequent bias we hear about older people not being able to use applications, and also to provide valuable feedback. We’ve found from these studies, the results of which will be published shortly in peer-reviewed journals, that software can be designed for long-term adherence, and this adherence to programs can lead to clinically-meaningful patient outcome improvements.

User-centered design relies on three principles, all of which can be practiced easily, but require continual discipline to practice. It’s easy to assume you know how your users or patients will react either based on your own experiences, or based on prior knowledge. There’s really no substitute for direct experience though. When we practice user-centered design, we think about things from three aspects:

Immersion

Place ourselves in the full experience through the eyes of the user. This is possibly the most powerful way to impact user-centered design, but sometimes the most difficult. Virtual reality is proving to be a great way to experience immersion. At the Kaiser Permanente Center For Total Health in Washington, DC, participants experience a virtual reality tour by a homeless man showing where he sleeps and spends his days. It’s very powerful to be right there with him. While this is definitely a deep-dive immersion experience, there are other ways like these physical therapy students who learned what it was like to age through simple simulations like braces, and crutches. Changing the font size on your screens can be a really easy way to see whether your solution is useable by those with less than 20/20 vision. With many technology solutions being built by young teams, immersion can be a very powerful tool for usable and accessible software.

Observation

Carefully watch and examine what people are actually doing. It can be really difficult to do this without jumping in and explaining how to use your solution. An interesting way to get started with observation is to start before you start building a solution: go and visit your end-user’s environment and take notes, video, and pictures.

Understanding what is around them when they are using your solution may give you much greater insight. When possible we try to visit the clinic before a deployment of Wellpepper. Simple things like whether wifi is available, how busy the waiting room is, and who is initiating conversations with patients can help us understand how to better build administrative tools that fit into the clinician’s workflow. Once you’ve started with observing your users where they will use your solution, the next step is to have them test what you’ve built. Again, it doesn’t have to be complicated. Starting with asking them how they think they would use paper wireframes or voice interface testing with Wizard of Oz scenarios can get you early feedback before you become too attached to your creations.

Conversation

Accurately capture conversations and personal stories. The personal stories will give you insight into what’s important to your users, and also uncover things that you can’t possibly know just by looking at usage data. Conversations can help you with this. The great thing about conversations is that they are an easy way to share feedback with team members who can’t be there, and personal stories help your team converge around personas. We’ve found personal stories to be really helpful in thinking about software design, in particular understanding how to capture those personal stories from patients right in the software by letting them set and track progress against their own personal goals.

Doctor’s often talk about how becoming a patient or becoming a care-giver for a loved one changes their experiences of healthcare and makes them better doctors. This is truly user-centered design, but deeply personal experience is not the only way to learn.

To learn more:

Check out the work Bon Ku, MD is doing at Jefferson University Hospital teaching design to physicians.

Visit the Kaiser Permanente Innovation Center.

Learn about our research with Boston University and Harvard to show patient adherence and outcome improvements.

Read these books from physicians who became patients.
In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Adwish, MD
When Breath Becomes Air Paul Kalanithi, MD

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Research

Leave a Comment (1) →

Falls Challenge

How might we enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls? We have entered a challenge with AARP and IDEO to bring our proven falls solutions to the masses. Along side our partners at Harvard and Boston University, we believe that using mobile technology to enhance and scale a proven falls prevention program will lead to better life by increasing access to care and decreasing costs.

The challenge started with over 220 submissions and recently weeded down to the top 40. We’re thrilled to have made the first cut. Our method is proven and we invite you to participate in the next round to refine our idea and help achieve greater impact.

Click here to check out our entry!

 

 

Posted in: Aging, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Research, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

What’s True Now?

 

Health systems and payers alike are scrambling to figure out what the incoming administration means by repealing Obamacare. The payers admitted to having no contingency plans if Trump won. Trump doesn’t have a clear model, and the Republican party has a number of proposals. Some involve changing the names of programs or offering them in a different way. Some involve scrapping large sections of the affordable care act.

Rather than second-guessing what’s to come, at Wellpepper, we are focusing on what’s true now and what will remain true going forward.

We believe these things will continue to hold true:

  • Innovation will continue. If anything we hope that new innovation in healthcare, and technology innovation in particular is driven by market forces rather than legislation which created winners out of what was not always the best technology.
  • Consumer-focus is good. 20M newly insured individuals and high-deductibles helped create a market for new care organizations like local urgent care and patient-focused primary care. This consumer evolution will continue as patients demand that their healthcare dollars deliver good service.
  • Value and outcome focused approaches will be rewarded. Whether it’s traditional payers or self-insured employers, the light has been shone on areas to improve care AND reduce costs. Healthcare organizations have seen investments in outcomes pay off as well.

It’s time for a new patient experience that is real-time, connected, and based on the individual. We need to take advantage of the ability of technology to scale, analyze, and deliver personal experiences to leapfrog the current technology implementations in healthcare and deliver better outcomes and greater value in healthcare.

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Outcomes

Leave a Comment (0) →

Patients As Designers Of Their Own Health

Seattle’s grassroots healthcare community continues to gain traction with a new meetup for patient-centered design. Last week’s meeting was generously sponsored by MCG a subsidiary of Hearst Publications who are quite active in the healthcare world with content and education. The panel discussion featured Dana Lewis, a patient-maker who is active in the open source movement for diabetes care and built her own artificial pancreas, Christina Berry-White from the digital health group at Seattle Children’s, and Amy London, Innovation Specialist at Virginia Mason. The group talked about how to effectively get feedback from patients, and how patient hackers like Dana can take poor design into their own hands build tools they need, and ultimately influence large healthcare companies, in this case device manufacturers.

600_452599813

Dana, Christina, and Amy, photo credit Alina Serebryany

The panel had great advice for understanding and developing products and improving processes for patients, as well as for soliciting feedback from patients. Here are a few of my takeaways.

Tips for developing products and process

  • Understand patient’s goals and desires. Often the goals of the hospital or health system are not the same as the patient’s. After meeting with a group of patient advocates one Virginia Mason surgeon realized that the only outcome that really mattered was whether the patient had a positive experience.
  • Let patients customize their views and experiences. Amy talked about a particular chart where she wanted to see the graph rising to show increasing blood sugar and another user she talked to wanted to see the graph lowering to show insulin lowering and a need for intervention. Amy was confused by this view but created her open source artificial pancreas interface to enables people to choose their own view, and the result was that people who had diabetes looked at it the same way Amy did and parent-caregivers of diabetic children wanted the second view. Which brings us to the next point–
  • Differentiate between users. Patients often have different requirements than their caregivers, whether that’s parents caring for a child or teen, or adult children caring for a parent. As well, the clinical workflow shouldn’t dictate the patient experience.
  • Get feedback early. Amy mentioned meeting with a device manufacturer who showed her an almost ready for release glucometer that was intended to fit in the pocket. She quipped “you obviously didn’t test this with women’s pockets.”

Tips for collecting feedback

  • Build it into the product. Christina from Children’s mentioned that when they switched from reams of paper to an iPad-based tool for patient on-boarding forms the physicians wanted to stop using it because it did not immediately integrate with the EMR. Luckily the tool had a feature to survey users on whether they preferred using it to paper, and the answer from parents was overwhelmingly yes. The digital health team showed these results to the physicians, and the tool stayed in place.
  • Be creative when soliciting feedback. Children’s knew from experience that parents and patients were reluctant to give them negative feedback after a lifesaving experience like an organ transplant, so they used techniques that are often used in brand market research: analogies. For example, they asked teens to describe a digital tool as a car, and found out that their tool was like a pick-up truck to them: useful but utilitarian.
  • Use patients to collect feedback. Patients are also often intimidated to provide direct feedback to healthcare professionals as they see them as authority figures. At Virginia Mason patients who have already had a successful joint replacement visit post-surgical patients to find out how they are doing, and talk about their own experiences. Patients are a lot more candid with each other, and Virginia Mason was able to benefit from understanding the questions they asked the peer ambassadors and incorporate that information into formal programs.
  • Ask the questions at the right time. If you want to understand post-operative experiences ask within a few weeks of the actual experience, not 6 months later.
  • Be aware of selection bias. Patients who volunteer for focus groups are often those who have the time and money to be able to do so. Your feedback may be skewed towards retired patients, and those who are not hourly workers. Consider how you will cast a wide net.

Lots of great advice at this event, much of which we already incorporate into our processes and products at Wellpepper, although I definitely got some new ideas and it’s great to see the community coming together to share best practices. My only disappointment with the event was that with a title of Patients as Designers, I expected to see more patients on the panel. While there was a last minute cancellation of a patient-maker, it would have been amazing to have Children’s and Virginia Mason bring one of their patient-designers to be on the panel. Maybe next time?

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Lean Healthcare, Research, Seattle

Leave a Comment (0) →

Every Patient Has a Story

I have just returned from my first Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 (PX2016), and I’m inspired. At Wellpepper, we are focused on empowering the patient to feel ownership and accountability to participate in their healthcare journey. The Beryl Institute and their members are doing the same and it was great to connect with so many like-minded people. The PX2016 conference is just one way they bring together this community.

PX2016 is 6 years young and attended by mostly caregivers, nurses, doctors, regular people who were touched by a personal health experience and now are in the field, and patients. With only 1000 attendees, it’s possible to form relationships. There was lots of hugging, sharing, pictures and overall excitement to be in Dallas. I met several newbies and like me, they were inspired too.

The conference opened up with a real life patient story. Les, a heart attack survivor, told his story of how he was participating in a sculling exercise and went into cardiac arrest in the middle of the water. The following chain of events happened that allowed him to be standing in front of us to tell his story. A retired nurse was on board and jumped into action to do CPR (she was filling in for her friend who couldn’t make it), the bowman had his cell phone to call 911 (typically he doesn’t bring it on the boat), another rower in his own boat happened to be near the dock gate and had a key to unlock the gate (usually locked because it was 5:30AM) which allowed the paramedics to get to Les. If there was one break in that chain, Les would not be with us. He went on to share his experience about his care at UCLA Medical Center and how every touch point from the people on the boat, to paramedics, to the care team made a difference in his recovery. By this time, there was not a dry eye in the place. It was all about why we in this profession of healthcare really do want to make a difference in the patient experience.

This lead to the theme that every patient has a story. From the other keynotes to the sessions I attended, this theme was pervasive. The focus of PX 2016 is to share stories, best practices and ideas on how to bring together interactions, culture and perceptions across the continuum of care.

In the session, Removing Complexity from the Post-Acute Care Patient (one of our passions at Wellpepper), it became clear that the long term care model needs to be reinvented for simplicity. True simplicity comes from matching the patient’s experience with the patient’s expectations. As an example, The New Jewish Home is renaming its post-acute rehabilitation to The Rapid Recovering Center which supports setting a different tone for the patient and ultimately in their experience. When a patient is sent to a post-acute rehabilitation center it can suggest a long and difficult recovery. But, naming it the Rapid Recovery Center aligns with the patient’s expectation of wanting to get better as soon as possible.

Another session that hit close to Wellpepper’s core values was how University of Chicago puts family and patients first in their patient experience strategy. Enhancing Patient Experience and Engagement through Technology Innovation by Sue Murphy, RN, Executive Director- Patient Experience and Engagement Program and Dr. Alison Tothy, Associate CMO – Patient Experience and Engagement Program at University of Chicago suggest the ability to capture real-time opportunities for engaging patients in their care and in their service expectations with innovative technology and techniques can lead to overall happier patients. Such technologies like rounding, discharge call centers and interactive patient care have led to substantial outcome improvements. However, just implementing technology did not solve the patient experience challenge. A culture shift in the staff was required which inspired them focus on individualized care for each patient. Combining a culture shift with innovative technology has allowed the University of Chicago to increase patient satisfaction scores, reduce readmission rates and improve outcomes. Furthermore, leadership is engaged and excited about the power of technology to improve the patient experience.

To bring it to a close, we were inspired by another personal patient story from Kelly Corrigan. She is a New York Times best-selling author who shares her most personal stories, including her health challenges. She has had more than her share of health encounters between herself and her family. She read an excerpt from her book, The Middle Place, where her and her Dad where both diagnosed with cancer in the same year. It was a compassionate and funny rendition of when she just starting her chemotherapy sessions and her Dad came across country for support. She talked about how in the middle of crisis, magnificent can happen. She was amazed to witness how all the people around her, including herself, able to conform into the new reality – cancer. Although a happy ending for her, not so much for her father. He passed away last year. She emphasized how at the end of her father’s journey, she made a point to thank all the caregivers for they really did make a difference in a very difficult time. Then looking out at all of us in the audience at that moment, almost with a tone of authority, she challenged us to hold on to the feelings of why we went into healthcare.

For some of us, it was a personal experience. For others, it was the opportunity to make a difference. Regardless, as Kelly so eloquently put it, people want to feel as if they have been felt and be a good listener because every patient has a story.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare transformation, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

Leave a Comment (1) →

Did HIMSS deliver on its Charter? Transforming Health through IT

HIMSS Annual Conference
February 29-March 4, 2016

Another HIMSS has come and gone for me. I will not brag about how many times I have attended this conference, but I will brag about it being the first time with Wellpepper. Overall, the level of activity exceeded our expectations and validated the need for innovative patient engagement technologies like ours.

Being with a new company gave me a whole new perspective on the HIMSS annual event. Reflecting back, years of HIMSS events can blur together and it can seem like the same old same old. This year was different: the healthcare ecosystem is going through a profound change and the providers and payers know this. Health systems are beginning to understand that the model is moving away from a passive engagement with the patient, to a model where the patient is taking more initiative to include their own wants/needs to participate in their care delivery.

With that, comes a whole new set of demands from the patient consumer and that I believe is where HIMSS is trying to make the transformation.  For the second year, HIMSS has partnered with HX360’s Innovation Pavilion to showcase pioneering health IT solutions that are addressing these challenges. As a start-up company, we can often get lost in the maze of vendors at a large conference such as HIMSS (estimates suggest more than 1200 exhibitors). The HX360 Innovation Pavilion provides an opportunity for entrepreneurial health IT companies to shine… and that we did.

Along with this venue, HX360 sponsors an Executive Program that runs concurrent with HIMSS. These educational sessions attract leaders such as Chief Innovation Officers, Nursing Informatics Officers and Vice Presidents of Digital Health who are looking for innovative solutions from companies like Wellpepper. Because of this venue and opportunity, we were able to have meaningful conversations with IT and executives that are looking to get a head of the curve and provide innovative solutions for their patients and systems.

Upon my travels home, I felt optimistic this shift to value-based healthcare will really drive innovation and allow companies like Wellpepper to part of the conversation and solution. The future appears to be bright and full of opportunity.  It is an exciting time for both the healthcare community and the consumer.

So, did HIMSS hit their mark? In part, yes. HIMSS is making great strides to keep up with the changing landscape of healthcare. No longer is it just about the EMR, servers, networks and storage in the IT back room. It’s about patient facing solutions that provide ownership and accountability for the patient while securing that brand loyalty for the provider.

The transformation of healthcare is now. Healthcare does not take to change lightly. But, companies like Wellpepper will continue to pave the way to innovation and the industry will take notice.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Telemedicine

Leave a Comment (0) →

Disruptive Innovation to Improve Mental Health Care

Health Innovators Collaborative, University of WA Bioengineering
Dr. Jurgen Unützer, Chair of UW Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The Health Innovators Collaborative seminar that I attend last week by Dr. Unutzer gave me an emotional whirlwind, which is ironic because the subject was mental health. That afternoon I innocently put my boots on and galloped down to the university in my VW Beetle and waited for the seminar to begin by eating an apple in the front row. I had no idea what was in store for me in the next 60 minutes or so. I would have cowardly slumped down into my chair if this was a talk taking place outside of Washington… because I am so ashamed about how we brush our mental illness folks under the rug. My jaw almost dropped in shock; we are ranked 48 out of 51 to have the correct resources available for our mentally ill with only 20 psychiatrists in Rural Washington. Dr. Unutzer argued that we spend more money on preventing auto accidents and homicide, when the rate of suicide is much higher- there is a suicide every 15 minutes in our country and 2-3 a day in Washington.

IMPACT- Collaborative Care Model

After giving us such somber news he talked at great lengths about ‘working smarter’ in order to close the gap of inadequate mental health professionals. One of the largest treatment trials for depression, Improving Mood–Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) was spearheaded by Dr. Unutzer and his colleagues. They designed IMPACT to function in two ways; “The patient’s primary care physician works with a mental health care manager (can be a mental health nurse, social worker etc.) to develop and implement a treatment and the mental health care manager and primary care provider consult with psychiatrist to change treatment plans if patients do not improve.” The IMPACT study was started over 15 years ago when the use of EMRs and video conferencing were just starting to become ‘mainstream’. Therefore in a way this study was the forerunner in utilizing a multi-based ‘high tech’ mental health patient care platform; population registry/database (tracking tool of patients PHI, treatments, etc.) psychiatric consultation (video), treatment protocols and outcome measures (I feel I am writing about Wellpepper!). The video consultation takes place between the patient and a remote psychiatrist typically after treatments protocols are administered in the primary cares office with little or no patient improvement. This is imperative especially in Washington where half of the counties don’t have a single psychiatrist or psychologist.

There is a great JAMA article written on the outcomes of the IMPACT program (I am proud to say I did my homework on the positive slides presented and not the slippery slides) that really nails out the particulars in the normal scientific journal fashion. As always I shot to the bottom of such article for the ‘results and conclusions’ because I knew this one was going to be great, I had a sneak peak last Wednesday. After a year 45% of the 1801 patients studied had a 50% or greater reduction in depressive symptoms from baseline compared with 19% of usual care participants! Furthermore this study reduced healthcare costs; $6.50 saved for every $1 invested, with the most being saved in inpatient medical and pharmacy costs. In conclusion having a system that provides population based care, that is patient centered, has target treatment solutions, and is evidence based leads to more efficient modes of getting a patient in and out the door with positive results.

I exhaled what a clever man you are Dr. Unutzer to present your slides in such an order, from negative/scary to positive/uplifting, it’s almost like you are a psychiatrist and now how the mind works, oh wait you are!! Thank you for a wonderful talk, it was superb and always nice to learn something new!

Next seminar is “Bad Language, Worse Outcomes” with Jeremy Stone, MD MBA on November 3.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Interoperability, Outcomes, Seattle, Telemedicine

Leave a Comment (0) →

You Could Get Well Here: Touring Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Center for InnovationDuring the recent Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Transform Conference, attendees had the opportunity to take tours of various Mayo facilities.

I was able to tour the Center For Innovation, where we will be working periodically over the next year as part of our prize for winning the Mayo and Avia Think Big Innovation challenge, and the Center for Healthy Living. A third tour, of the new Well Living Lab was sold out before we could get tickets.

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

The Well Living Lab is a research center where the health impacts of daily living can be tested. For example, researchers expect to study the impacts of air quality or lighting in office buildings on employee health. Tour organizers told me that the paint was still drying on the center as they start the tours so I’m sure we’ll be hearing more about this innovative center in the future.

Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Tour

The Center For Innovation houses two main areas, one a clinical space where real patients and care teams can test different types of exam room configurations and equipment, and the other more like a typical software or design office. Pictures were limited in this area, so you’ll have to imagine from my descriptions.

All the walls in the clinical space are magnetic, enabling different types of room configurations on the fly. Even the artwork is affixed with magnets, so I suppose it’s possible to also test the effect of different artists as well. When medical teams work out of the CFI space, they are testing not just the patient experience but whether these new configurations make teams more productive or collaborative. The CFI has found a number of improvements to care are possible with better room configuration, and noted that clinics and exam rooms have changed very little since the 1950s.Human Centered Design

A few innovative examples include:

  • A kidney-shaped table encourages more collaboration and communication between doctors and patients
  • Separate consultation and exam rooms offer many benefits in both communication and efficiency. Patients are less stressed, more able to absorb information, and ask questions in a consultation room rather than sitting on a table in an exam room. Two physicians can share one exam room when there are two consultation rooms and therefore they can see more patients in only 1.5 times the space of a normal exam room.
  • An open plan office where all of the care team, nurses, medical assistants, schedulers can work encourages team collaboration and also empathy as each member has much better insight into what the others are doing.
    How Patients Experience Services

    How Patients Experience Services

At the CFI, we learned about projects that have recently been completed (although they were mum on work in progress), like a project to overhaul post-discharge instructions for total joint replacement. This is a hot topic lately as CMS moves to value-based bundles for reimbursing these procedures it’s even more important to manage care outside the clinic, and do to that patients need to understand what they need to do. This is a topic near and dear to our hearts at Wellpepper.

Other projects included exer-gaming for seniors, and Project Mars named as a challenge to completely reimagining the Mayo Clinic experience as though they were building a new Mayo on Mars. This experience spans pre-visit to post visit and includes patient care and the patient’s experience in the physical space.

Mayo Clinic Center for Healthy Living

The Center for Healthy Living is an impressive new facility in the middle of Mayo campus. The Center is focused on proactive and preventative experiences for people who want to take action managing their health.

IMG_2373

Yoga studio with a view

This may include executives who believe health and fitness is a competitive business advantage to people diagnosed as pre-diabetes who are motivated not to become diabetic, to people wanting to regain health and strength after cancer treatment. The Center takes a wholistic approach, and guests (as visitors are called) frequently book a week-long package that includes physical assessment, diet, and stress and spirituality consultations.

The living wall

The living wall

Consultations on diet include cooking classes and nutritional information including how to read labels and understand what’s really in your food.

The Center also houses a spa, which is apparently a best kept secret in Rochester. Throughout the center the design is calming, including floor to ceiling windows and a living wall, and it really feels like a place you can get well.

Clients are sent home with specialized treatment programs and recommendations to support their lifestyle changes permanently. The Center has only been open for a year, and ideally will seen clients coming back year over year for a tune up. It’s definitely a place I’d visit again.

More pictures of the Center for Healthy Living.

IMG_2370

The Nutrition Pantry

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Rest with a view

Rest with a view

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

Leave a Comment (0) →

What Can We Learn from the UK Health System?

There’s no perfect health system in the world, at least not that we’ve heard of. The US is plagued by high costs and uneven coverage across the country. Other systems like those in Canada and the UK have long wait times and can be glacially slow to adopt new technologies (aka pilotitis). However, taking a closer look into those systems can provide an interesting alternate viewpoint, and yet, so much is strangely familiar especially in the struggle to address the health problems of an unfit and aging population. We’ve recently been turned on to the Inside Health podcast from the BBC where topics range from those of national healthcare administration and benefits to specific health issues. Unlike many health publications, Inside Health frequently features patients talking about their experiences with the system.

Here’s a snapshot of questions posed on recent episodes:

  • Should medical screening with MRIs and CT scans be done proactively? This session talked about the risk of over-screening patients who are not visibly ill. While early detection is key to catch and treat many types of cancer, the screens often catch issues like tumors that would have gone away on their own, and therefore cause undue stress, cost, and discomfort to patients.
  • Should fruit juice be removed from food guidelines? Citing that calories that are drunk rather than eaten are not recognized by the body (aka empty calories) and that most fruit juice has all the fiber (aka the best part of the fruit) removed, the guest argued that fruit juice should not be part of the 5-6 services of fruit and vegetables recommended per day.
  • How should private hospitals be regulated? This story was particularly interesting, as it seems that the many private hospitals that are cropping up to take excess demand from the UK’s National Health Service, are not regulated in the same way as government-run hospitals. In this episode they examined some cases of knee and hip replacements gone wrong due to the lack of proper follow-on care. Since private often denotes more expensive and hopefully better quality it was curious to hear that they were not following standards.
  • Should healthcare professionals be fit? This controversial question was asked about whether healthcare professionals should be held to higher health standards, especially with respect to obesity, to set a good example for patients.
  • Should doctors be paid based on specific quality measures? This segment examined financial incentives for primary care physicians to complete certain tests and concluded that doctors will ignore financial incentives if they don’t believe the tests are in the best interests of the patients. However, in the example they cited, the incentive was $50 for doing a standard depression screening test which might be argued is not enough compensation for the hassle of the additional charting and follow up that the depression screen would have caused, not to mention the impact on patients who might not have actually been depressed.

You may notice a slightly paternalistic (or is that maternalistic?) bent to these topics, which is understandable as the UK has a national health system. However, all of them are topical and relevant to discussion occurring in the US right now. (Remember the uproar over soda sizes in New York?) Segments are short and conversational and feature real patients. Plus they are all delivered with the dulcet tones of the BBC broadcasters so you feel smarter just by listening. If you’re looking for insight, and inquiry in healthcare, this is a great podcast to add to your list.

Posted in: Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation

Leave a Comment (0) →
Google+