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HIMSS 2018…See you there!

HIMSS17 in Orlando was a great conference for Wellpepper. We’re looking forward to HIMSS18 in Las Vegas even more!

We have a long list of sessions to attend and booths to visit, but below are some places you’re guaranteed to find us:

Monday, March 5th

  • Hear from Tami Deangelis on how our research partners at Boston University engaged patients outside the clinic and improved outcomes using Wellpepper care plans. She is speaking at the “Remote Patient Messaging for Adherence and Engagement” session from 4:05pm-4:25pm at the Patient Engagement & Experience Summit

Tuesday, March 6th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg will be demonstrating our voice-powered scale and foot scanner, and integrated diabetes care plan at the Industry Showcase at BHI & BSN 2018 https://bhi-bsn.embs.org/2018/industry-showcase/

Wednesday, March 7th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be sharing the Wellpepper Vision and Mission at HIMSS VentureConnect http://www.himssconference.org/education/specialty-programs/venture-connect
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be joining other industry leaders to continue the conversation with CMS toward inclusion of patient engagement and outcomes tracking in the MIPS Improvement Activity for provider reimbursement

Thursday, March 8th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-4:30pm

We can’t wait to connect with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience. Hope to see you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement, Uncategorized

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HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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HIMSS17 Sessions of Interest

We are thrilled to attend a number of sessions at HIMSS17 with topics pertaining to Wellpepper’s Vision and Goals!

Patient Engagement

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver an engaging patient experience that helps people manage their care to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Insight from Data

Sessions that impact our ability to derive insight from data to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Clinical Experience

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver more efficient experience for existing workflows and are non-disruptive for new workflows:

 

Posted in: big data, Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement

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Our Picks for HIMSS17

himss17-exhibitor-ad-design-300x250-copyHIMSS17 is right around the corner and we at Wellpepper have a lot to be excited about! By empowering and engaging patients, deriving insight from the data we collect, and delivering new value to clinical users without major disruption to existing clinical workflows, we can continue to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. At HIMSS17, we look forward to connecting with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience.

Sessions that we look forward to:

Our CEO and co-founder, Anne Weiler, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Anne will be a featured speaker at the Venture+ Forum, where former competition winners will be sharing how their business has grown, lessons learned and plans for the future. Since being named a winner of the 2015 Venture+ Forum Pitch competition, Wellpepper has continued to bridge the gap between the patient and care team and we are excited to share our progress and vision.
  • Anne will also be presenting a session titled, Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors, which will explore the role of design-thinking in design empathetic applications to deliver remote care for seniors based on studies completed by Boston University and researchers from Harvard Medical School.

Patient engagement expert Jan Oldenburg, who was featured in our August 2016 webinar, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Jan will be presenting a session titled, The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment. This session will highlight what it takes to create a truly participatory healthcare system that incorporates patients and caregivers, using digital health technology to reinforce and support participatory frameworks.
  • Jan will also be presenting a session titled, Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections. This session will focus on how Open Notes enhance the patient’s narrative of their journey through their condition and how this both strengthens the patient-physician relationship and empowers patients to take charge of their illness and wellness.

Christopher Ross, Chief Information Officer at Mayo Clinic will be leading a session on Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT. This session will discuss how the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are having a profound impact on how insights are generated from healthcare data.

Posted in: big data, M-health, patient engagement

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MACRA: A Rule Worth Learning

Introduction to MACRA

Those of us who that work closely with clinicians or simply work in healthcare have no doubt heard of the total revamping of Medicare (Part B) clinician payments from a fee-for-service to a value-based system; this sort of change hasn’t occurred in over a generation. If that isn’t incredible enough for you, how about the fact that this 892 page document was passed by Congress with a bi-partisan ‘supermajority’; that alone speaks volumes on the importance of this change. The culprit of my angst and information overload is called the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) that will go into effect 1/1/17. This rule is so complicated with so many layers, it does not even have a Wikipedia page (nobody as been so bold); so keeping that in mind this blog post is my attempt to sum up my own understanding of this proposed rule.

Courtesy of CMS.gov

Two pathways to payment. MACRA is built upon two value based pathways that eligible clinicians (physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and certified registered nurse anesthetists) must chose from: Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM). Which path a clinician takes depends on their patient threshold and if they are new to the Medicare. It also depends if the clinician is part of an Accountable Care Organization that is established as an APM entity. The advantage of one over the other is a 5 percent annual payment increase from CMS over 6 years if a physician decides to be grouped with their ACO APM entity. The risk is if clinicians do not meet metrics chosen and set by their ACO they will not be rewarded with their shared savings. The good news is Physicians can elect to switch between the two payment models from on year to another. This flexibility is the foundation to the MACRA proposed rule. Additional choices given to eligible clinicians are: they can report on measures that are important to them and decide if they want to report as an individual or in a group.

Courtesy of HIMMS MACRA information Webinar

Fundamental basics to the MIPS. The MIPS replaces the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), Value-Based Modifier (VBM) and Meaningful Use (MU) programs with the categories: Quality, Resource Use, Clinical Practice Improvement Activities and Advancing Care Information. Quality metrics are mainly derived from PQRS, Advancing Care Information is a simplified version of MU, and Resource Use is similar to VBM. The biggest change, as far as I can tell, is clinicians can choose six quality reporting measures that are important to them. Each year HHS will publish a list of quality measures to be used in the forthcoming MIPS performance period (which is 365 days) for clinicians to choose from. Out of these measures, one must be an outcome measure of high priority measure, one must be cross-cutting (hit on several quality measures), and clinicians can choose to report a specialty measure set. Clinicians composed quality score is measured against clinicians similar to themselves; this is another significant change. If you recall previously the sustainable growth rate (SGR) “set an arbitrary aggregate spending target” not based upon individual performance or clinician peers.

Introduction to Advance APM. There is a reason why I explained in more detail the MIPS path- because I understand it better; as with many things in my life I relate it to food. MIPS takes the wholesome ingredients from MU, PQRS and VBM programs and makes it a much better appeasing entrée. Whereas the Advanced APM program doesn’t focuses so much on the recipe but on the consumer. From what I understand so far, you have to be an eligible clinician determined by CMS, and work in an organization that participates already as an APM through an agreement with CMS. Also, so far, CMS has only identified six APMs that qualify as Advanced APMs. These include Comprehensive End Stage Renal Disease care, Comprehensive Primary Care Plus, Medicare Shared Savings Program (Track 2 and 3), Next Generation ACO Model, and Oncology Care Model. The three criterion’s in order to become an Advance APM clinicians are: 50% of physicians must use Certified EHR technology; payments are based on quality measures; financial risk and nominal amount standards. I hope to dive deeper into Advanced APMs in a later blog post. For now please check out the HIMSS information deck here.

MACRA professional I am not… is anyone? Whereas I love to always learn, MACRA was difficult for me to grasp, HOWEVER I spent about 2 years in Graduate school studying Meaningful Use, so that says a lot. I am sad to say that a lot of what I learned about MU no longer applicable, but good riddance! The beginning of this year the Acting Administrator of CMS said “The Meaningful Use program as it has existed, will now be effectively over and replaced with something better.” I hope we you are right Mr. Slavitt.

Posted in: Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes

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Patient Engagement Goes Mainstream: 5 Observations from HIMSS 2016

A walk through the trade show floor, and a glance at some of the sessions at HIMSS, quickly indicates that patient engagement is everywhere, which is great because an empowered patient is key to improving outcomes and lowering costs of care. There is still a lot of noise in this space however, with anything from wayfinding applications to billing services being billed as patient engagement. Let me set the record straight: making sense of things that are very confusing and often poorly designed, like hospitals and healthcare billing is not patient engagement, it’s explanation. That said, there are many innovative companies and healthcare organizations who are taking patient engagement seriously.

Here are 5 impressions or things heard at HIMSS about patient engagement and the state of healthcare IT:

  1. There are a lot of solutions in this space/competition is good. While there may be companies that have joined the space because patient engagement is a hot topic, real competition shows a real need and market.
  2. Clinical workflow does not equal patient engagement. True patient engagement solutions are designed around the needs of the patient.
  3. Engagement does not equal alignment. While this was said about physicians it’s also applicable to patients. A surgical patient can’t help but be engaged, but are the patient and physician aligned on the patient’s goals.
  4. Healthcare IT is emerging from the EMR era. Meaningful use drove widespread adoption of EMRs and monopolized IT resources for the past X years. IT is now ready to take a seat at the table and proactively suggest solutions to the clinical side of the house.
  5. People are asking how a solution is different rather than why they need a solution. This is a huge shift: at our booth we spent a lot less time explaining what we do and how we do it.

We’re looking forward to what the next year will bring. It seems like we’re at the starting blocks for some real value-based implementations of patient engagement solutions.

Patient Engagement Hits The Mainstream

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement

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Did HIMSS deliver on its Charter? Transforming Health through IT

HIMSS Annual Conference
February 29-March 4, 2016

Another HIMSS has come and gone for me. I will not brag about how many times I have attended this conference, but I will brag about it being the first time with Wellpepper. Overall, the level of activity exceeded our expectations and validated the need for innovative patient engagement technologies like ours.

Being with a new company gave me a whole new perspective on the HIMSS annual event. Reflecting back, years of HIMSS events can blur together and it can seem like the same old same old. This year was different: the healthcare ecosystem is going through a profound change and the providers and payers know this. Health systems are beginning to understand that the model is moving away from a passive engagement with the patient, to a model where the patient is taking more initiative to include their own wants/needs to participate in their care delivery.

With that, comes a whole new set of demands from the patient consumer and that I believe is where HIMSS is trying to make the transformation.  For the second year, HIMSS has partnered with HX360’s Innovation Pavilion to showcase pioneering health IT solutions that are addressing these challenges. As a start-up company, we can often get lost in the maze of vendors at a large conference such as HIMSS (estimates suggest more than 1200 exhibitors). The HX360 Innovation Pavilion provides an opportunity for entrepreneurial health IT companies to shine… and that we did.

Along with this venue, HX360 sponsors an Executive Program that runs concurrent with HIMSS. These educational sessions attract leaders such as Chief Innovation Officers, Nursing Informatics Officers and Vice Presidents of Digital Health who are looking for innovative solutions from companies like Wellpepper. Because of this venue and opportunity, we were able to have meaningful conversations with IT and executives that are looking to get a head of the curve and provide innovative solutions for their patients and systems.

Upon my travels home, I felt optimistic this shift to value-based healthcare will really drive innovation and allow companies like Wellpepper to part of the conversation and solution. The future appears to be bright and full of opportunity.  It is an exciting time for both the healthcare community and the consumer.

So, did HIMSS hit their mark? In part, yes. HIMSS is making great strides to keep up with the changing landscape of healthcare. No longer is it just about the EMR, servers, networks and storage in the IT back room. It’s about patient facing solutions that provide ownership and accountability for the patient while securing that brand loyalty for the provider.

The transformation of healthcare is now. Healthcare does not take to change lightly. But, companies like Wellpepper will continue to pave the way to innovation and the industry will take notice.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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Flexible Care for Independent Aging: Don’t Dumb It Down!

I had the pleasure of participating on a panel on technology for aging, along with Honor founder Seth Sternberg and CareTicker founder Chiara Bell during the HX360 event at HIMSS 2016. (HX360 is a “conference within a conference” focused on innovation and C-suite leadership.) The panel was hosted by Jeff Makowka, Director of Market Innovation for AARP, and ranged from topics on entrepreneurship and whether there is a venture rush to technology for aging now to approaches for delivering care for aging in place.

Interestingly, all three panelists were inspired by personal experiences to found our companies. For me, it was poor discharge instructions and lack of continuity of care when my mom was released from 6 months in a long-term care facility. For Seth and Chiara, it was trying to figure out how to enable their parents to age at home. It’s a classic entrepreneurial model to experience a problem and try to find a solution to it, provided the market is big enough, and this market certainly is based only on demographics of the aging baby boomers. Seth and I both made the leap from technology, Seth from Google, and me from Microsoft, and Chiara from a long history in healthcare and homecare.

We were much sharper in real life.

We were much sharper in real life.

Honor’s $20M in funding lead by Andressen Horowitz is proof that Silicon Valley is paying attention to homecare, which can be viewed as important from two aspects: first we need innovative and new thinking to approach these challenges, and second these solutions could require a lot of money. (Although I would posit that we need patient capital in this space, something that Silicon Valley is not always known for. Interestingly, the same week as the panel Dave Chase and Andrey Ostrovsky posted a piece on why Silicon Valley does not belong in homecare. Maybe they should be on next year’s panel.)

The three panelist companies took similar approaches in using technology to scale and empower the people in the process, both patients and caregivers. For Wellpepper it’s about empowering the patient to follow their care plans and get remote support from the healthcare team. Honor and Careticker are more focused on the patient and their homecare team, whether that is professionals or family members. What was similar in the approach was providing information in real-time to the people who need it, and treating everyone in the process with respect. Honor does this by ensuring homecare workers are paid a living wage. Careticker does this by recognizing for people to age in place, the family caregivers need the right information and supports and Wellpepper does this with patient-centered and highly-usable software that is not dumbed down for the aging.

We were perhaps the outlier on this panel as our solution is not aimed specifically at the elderly. However, you could say we are the most representative of the way we need to approach the challenge: we need solutions that are designed with empathy, putting the patient first, and are not categorizing people into “young” and “old.” Well designed solutions and products should can address a broad spectrum of users, and we need to treat those aging in our population as another audience in this spectrum.

Posted in: Aging, Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, Patient Satisfaction

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Cross-Fit for Healthcare: An HX360 Workshop

At the recent HIMSS 2016 conference in Las Vegas, Robin Schroeder-Janonis, Wellpepper’s VP of Business Development,  and I were up early for cross-fit. Not the total body workout you may expect, but a workout nonetheless in the session “Innovation Cross-Fit” facilitated by Leslie Wainwright, Molly Coye, Gregory Makoul, and John Kutz. The cross-fit in this session referred to cross-organizational teams, the type required to implement innovation in healthcare and the workout took the form of a workshop where participants determined how big of a lift it would be to implement a new innovation.

Each table was comprised of a cross-section of senior healthcare leaders including CIOs, CEOs, business development, innovation leaders, IT, and marketing/communications. As a warm up, we were asked to evaluate the effort to implement a new innovation from a number of axes including user experience, implementation, stakeholders, path to scale, and opportunity. Our table was asked to evaluate the Proteus Discover Platform, a new category of ingestible medicine. We were given a high-level brief of Proteus and set loose.

In evaluating the “lift” for Proteus our group took into consideration a number of factors. First, while the population that would receive the ingestible medication would be relatively small, the legal and privacy impacts could be huge. As a result, we ranked higher complexity on user training and stakeholders, particularly with respect to medical users who would need to explain how the medication worked. Implementation costs were low as there was no IT involvement and no new hires, and only some new hardware required.

Here’s an example of the scorecard from our table:

Cross-Fit For Innovation

The next step was to map the implementation journey by adding steps in the process and stakeholders involved at each step. Our group started with the process steps and added stakeholders after the initial process was mapped out. Others fully explored each step before moving on to the next in the process. We found that there were a few stakeholders missing from the provided stack, for example although this was a medication we didn’t have a sticker for pharmacists, and that we had stakeholders participating in multiple process steps: patients and end users for example were seen at multiple stages.

In this stage the interdisciplinary teams brought their own experiences and filters to the table, which resulting in a more inclusionary process. For example, marketing representatives suggested that although the board of directors was not required to approve the implementation because the budget was so low, that they should be on an FYI list before any press releases related to using the new technologies. Operations people pointed out that procurement was left out of the process initially, and yet they’d have to sign the contracts and issue the POs.

Here’s what the process looked like from my group:

Innovation Journey Map

Finally, groups presented to each other, and this is where things got really interesting, as you can see the approach differed significantly across groups. Our group heavilty weighted the beginning of the process while another used iteration to get the same effect. Another group’s results showed that organization was the driving principle.

IMG_2559 IMG_2558

 

For me, the top takeaways from the session were:

  • Don’t be surprised how quickly a group of individuals with completely different backgrounds and experiences can coalesce to get a job done.
  • Innovation takes a cross-disciplinary team.
  • Making sure the right stakeholders are involved at each step is important, and consider that stakeholders aren’t necessarily decision makers, but they can also be people who need to be informed about the project.
  • The more time you spend in the first part of the process the easier the actual implementation
  • Conferences need more interactive sessions like this but it would also be an easy activity for a team within a health system

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Lean Healthcare

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Postcards from HIMSS M-Health 2015

HIMSS M-HealthIt’s been a busy couple of weeks at Wellpepper with both the AAKHS annual conference and HIMSS M-Health Summit at the Gaylord Convention Center in National Harbor where Wellpepper was honored to have won the Venture+ Pitch along with CirrusMD. This was our second year attending the conference and we noticed that the hype for digital health is a bit lower and perhaps that represents market maturity. It could also be that organizations are in the thick of implementation and don’t have the success stories to tell yet. We believe in digital health and are rolling up our sleeves so will take this feeling that we are moving to incremental change as a positive sign.

Venture+: The Market Is Maturing

We participated in the Venture+ Pitch last year as well which was won by fellow our fellow Springboard Alumna Prima-Temp. Prima-Temp was the clear winner last year, already raising their Series B. However, there were a ton of startups with only an idea. This year the criteria was that startups have revenue before applying, and the competition was held in two parts, the first an invitation-only session where 11 startups pitched and panelists talked about the market opportunity in general, and then a final round with 4 excellent startups and really tough questions from the judges. We were a bit earlier on our journey than a couple of the other startups in the final pitch so were honored to be recognized along with CirrusMD.Clinic of the Past and Present

Interestingly the startup area on the tradeshow floor was almost entirely made up of a new class of startups. So, while the market for M-Health may be maturing somewhat, there are still new entrants attracted by the promise of disruption.

Incremental Progress and Show Me The Evidence

I was only able to attend Day 1 Keynotes, and I heard that the Day 2 keynotes were great, especially by Shahram Ebadollahi of IBM Watson Healthcare. On Day 1, with the exception of an excellent presentation from Dr. Wood from Mayo Center for Innovation (disclosure: as part of winning the Mayo ThinkBig challenge we have the opportunity to work with CFI for the next year), most of the presentations were quite low-key. The main problem was the voice of the patient was missing: the focus was on initiatives or technology. I timed it. 1.5 hours into the keynote and we heard the first end-user story, and it wasn’t really a patient, it was a blind runner who used FitBit.

Dr. Wood shook everyone out of complacency and called out for a faster adoption of healthcare innovation, pointing out how basic things like patient treatment rooms have not changed dramatically in the last 50 years. He asked the audience to consider going beyond patient-reported outcomes and consider the outcomes that matter to patients. What would the system look like if we paid for health rather than healthcare, and we paid based on people being able to reach their own self-defined goals? Digital health is an enabler of this new system, but really, it’s about taking a patient or people-centered approach to health and to care.

What Patients WantAgain, maybe it’s a sign of market maturity, but the conference this year seemed more evolutionary rather than revolutionary. Themes from previous years were expanded on. For example, Judy Murphy of IBM talked about how consumer expectations expectations are fueling demand for m-health. People expect the same level of transparent and always available technology to manage their healthcare as they get from any other consumer experience.

HoneyBee and IPSOs announced the launch of the Global M-Health Survey which also pointed to ubiquity and consumer expectations and desire for M-Health. (The final survey results will be available in Q1.)

In a number of sessions Apple Research Kit was heralded as a major breakthrough for clinical trials. While the speed with which Research Kit was able to sign up study participants is certainly turning traditional research recruits on its head, the same limitations are still there: no HIPAA-compliant server infrastructure and selection-bias for those with more expensive devices. Interestingly, one of the greatest benefits for researchers seems to be the standardization of the informed consent process. (Note that Duke University will be open-sourcing the platform infrastructure they built in recognition that not all organizations have the skills and resources to build something like that.)

Interesting, how what was deemed such a major innovation at the time of release (less than a year ago), also seems a bit incremental. Again, we will take the glass-half full approach and say that we are reaching a market maturity where the gains are more incremental, although at next year’s conference we would really like to see more clinically-validated mobile health applications, and also more patient stories, preferably told by the patients themselves.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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