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Posts Tagged Healthcare Technology

Electronic Health Records and Physician Burnout: Fraught with Frustrations

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have become a scapegoat for physician burnout. A quick google search of “EHR” and “burnout” will yield nearly 350,000 results. Systematic reviews over the last 10 to 15 years look at much of this data and draw a similar conclusion; higher physician burnout rates are correlated to use of EHRs. They point at increased documentation times, decreased user satisfaction, and “clerical burden” as causes of burnout. Data from other sources suggest we may be laying the blame in the wrong place.

At Stanford Children’s Health, in an effort to improve physician satisfaction with EHR use, they have created extensive and personalized education programs. They obtained data from the EHR to develop an efficiency profile, surveyed physicians on their perspective of their efficiency, and performed observation sessions with physicians so support staff could see how physicians used the EHR. With this information, personalized learning plans were developed. Providers were incentivized to participate and they found physician satisfaction with EHR improved as well as their efficiency and less time spent on medical records outside of the hospital.

This suggest that the problem with the EHR is not of the EHR, but rather the onboarding and training process related to it. Most EHRs can be made to work for you, rather than against you, and improve your efficiency with documentation and patient care.

Physician Burnout in the Electronic Health Record Era: Are We Ignoring the Real Cause? Annals of Internal Medicine. July 2018.

Drs. Downing and Bates recently published in JAMA that there may be another underlying cause that is driving physician burnout and dissatisfaction which is being blamed on the EHR. In looking at health systems across the United States and abroad on a similar EHR (Epic Systems), they found that physicians abroad reported higher satisfaction with the EHR and that it improved their efficiency. In other countries, they noted, documentation is briefer, containing only essential clinical information rather than bogged down by compliance and reimbursement documentation. On average, within the same EHR, notes in the United States were found to be four times longer than those abroad. Notes in the United States had documentation requirements from a “clinically irrelevant” number of elements in each part of a note so that fee-for-service components are fulfilled.

Their argument suggest that a key cause of physician burnout which is being blamed on EHRs is actually our “outdated regulatory requirements.” With reform of these requirements, documentation would become only the essential clinical data, rather than notes with strict documentation requirements of a “clinically irrelevant number of elements” in the various components of a note.

A third argument that I would challenge us to consider as a more likely cause of physician burnout rather than the EHR is the cultural state of medicine in the United States. Due to increasing numbers of lawsuits over the last 20 years, physicians are spending a lot of time on “CYA” medicine (Cover Your A**), feeling forced to order unnecessary testing for an unlikely diagnosis “just in case” things do not go according to planned. We also get pulled into the trap of what I refer to as “Burger King” medicine, playing off the fast food giant’s slogan of “Have it your way.” Patients are coming to the physician already “knowing” their diagnosis and requesting specific treatments or testing. If the physician disagrees? No problem, the patient will just go find one down the road who will do what they want.

In an era of electronic health records on the rise and an increase in rates of physician burnout in the United States, it looks easy on paper to show a correlation between the two. What if instead the EHR is not to blame, but any number of other things like lack of physician EHR training and support, documentation regulations, or “Burger King” medicine? Is it more likely that the relationship between EHR prevalence and physician burnout is only a correlation and not a causal relationship? My hope is that in the coming years we will recognize the EHR as a tool to improve patient care and outcomes, increase our efficiency, and return to practicing medicine at the bedside.

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Healthcare + A.I. Northwest

The Xconomy Healthcare + A.I. Northwest Conference at Cambia Grove featured speakers and panels discussing the opportunities and prospects for applying machine learning and artificial intelligence to find solutions for health care. The consensus was that we are no longer held back by a lack of technological understanding and ability. A.I. and M.L. models can be learned at a large scale by harnessing the power of the cloud and advances in data science. According to the panelists, today’s challenges to incorporating A.I. into healthcare include abundant, but inadequate data and resistance from health systems and providers.

Many researchers have found insufficient data to be an unexpected challenge. As keynote speaker Peter Lee of Microsoft Research pointed out, the more data we have, the better our machine learned models can be. He used an analogy to a speech identifier trained on multiple languages such that the model predicted English better after learning French to illustrate that improvements can be made with large sets of unstructured data. Unfortunately, because we are not capturing enough of the right kind of data for researchers, much patient data is getting lost in the “health data funnel” due to PHI and quality concerns. Lee called for more data sharing and data transparency at every level.

Physician researchers on multiple panels were concerned about a lack of suitable data. Soheil Meshinchi, a pediatric oncologist from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, is engaged in collecting data specific to children. He discussed his research on Acute Myeloid Leukemia on the panel titled, ‘Will A.I. Help Discover and Personalize the Next Breakthrough Therapy?’. While there is a large body of research on AML in adults, he has found that the disease behaves much differently at a genomic level in children. He also expressed distrust in some published research because studies are rarely reproduced and often a researcher who presents results contrary to existing research faces headwinds at journals who are reticent to publish “negative data”. His focus at this point is gathering as much data as he can.

Matthew Thompson, a physician researcher at the University of Washington School of Medicine, argued on the “Innovations for the Over-Worked Physician” panel that technology has made patient interaction demonstrably worse, but that these problems can and should be solved innovatively with artificial intelligence. His specific complaints include both inputting and extracting data from health system EHRs, as well as an overall glut of raw patient data, often generated by the patient himself, and far too much published research for clinicians to digest.

Both keynote speakers, Microsoft’s Lee and Oren Etzioni of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, referenced the large numbers of research papers published every year. According to Etzioni, the number of scientific papers published has doubled every nine years since World War II. Lee referenced a statistic that 4000 studies on precision cancer treatments are published each year. They are both relying on innovative machine reading techniques to analyze and categorize research papers to make them more available to physicians (and other scientists). Dr. Etzioni’s team has developed SemanticScholar.org to combat the common challenges facing those who look for research papers. He aims to reduce the number of citations they must follow while also identifying the most relevant and up-to-date research available. One of the advantages of taking this approach to patient data

is that scientific texts have no PHI concerns. Lee’s team is marrying patient data and machine reading to match potential research subjects with appropriate NIH studies.

Dr. Thompson was concerned that too much data is presented to the medical staff and very few of the “predictive rules” used by ER personnel are both ‘accurate and safe’. When reviewing patient outcomes and observations to predict the severity of an infection, he found that patients or their caregivers would provide ample information, but often clinicians would disregard certain details as noise because they were atypical symptoms. The amount of data that providers have to observe for a patient is massive, but machine learned models may be utilized to distill that data into the most relevant and actionable signals.

Before data is gathered and interpreted, it must be collected. Like Dr. Thompson, Harjinder Sandhu of Saykara sees ponderous, physician-driven data entry via EHR as significant barrier to efficient data collection. Sandhu notes that healthcare is the only industry where the highest-paid teammember is performing this onerous task and his company is using artificial intelligence to ease that burden on the physician.

Once patient data has been aggregated and processed into models, the challenge is getting the information in front of providers. This requires buy-in from the health system, physician, and, occasionally, the patient and his caregivers. Mary Haggard of Providence Health and Services spoke on the “Tech Entrepreneurs Journey into Healthcare” panel and stated that the biggest problem for entrepreneurs is defining the correct problem to solve. During the “Investment Perspective” panel, Matt Holman of Echo Health Ventures recommended tech startups emphasize an understanding of the context of the problem within a health system.

One of the most important and difficult hurdles for health technology companies is working into clinical workflow. Mike McSherry from Xealth has found that physician champions who know how they want to use technology help with integrating into a health system or physicians group. Lynn McGrath of Eigen Healthcare believes physicians want their data to be defined, quick to assess, condensed, and actionable, while Shelly Fitz points out that providers are not used to all the data they are receiving and they don’t yet know how to use it all. These are all issues that can and will be solved as healthcare technology continues to become more intelligent.

As Wellpepper’s CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg pointed out, health systems and doctors are resistant to “shiny new things”, for good reason. When approaching a health system, in addition to engaging the administration, clinicians need to understand why the machine learned model is recommending a given course of treatment. After integration, patients will also want to understand why a given course of treatment is being recommended. Applying artificial intelligence solutions to medicine must take into account the human element, as well.

The exciting possibilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning are hindered more by human constraints in health systems and data collection than by available technology. “Patients are throwing off all kinds of data when they’re not in the clinic,” according to our CTO. Wellpepper’s tools for capturing patient-generated data provide a pathway for providers to access actionable analysis.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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Comprehensiveness + Comprehension: effect of technology on discharge instructions

Whether patients are leaving the emergency department or being released from an extensive hospitalization, they need discharge instructions in order to solve their initial problem, better self-manage, and coordinate the appropriate follow-up. These instructions are typically written and are also articulated to the patient. We know that due to varying levels of health literacy, or the degree to which individuals have the capacity to process and understand basic health information needed to make appropriate health decisions [1], a patient is especially vulnerable during the process of discharge in terms of overall understanding and appropriate follow through. Can technology empower patients operating from a position of weakness in this transition?

  • According to the 2013 study entitled Information Technology Improves Emergency Department Patient Discharge Instructions Completeness and Performance on a National Quality Measure, researchers were able to show that electronic discharge instructions were more complete than paper-based information. The electronic discharge instructions had 97.3% compliance to a CMS quality measure while the paper-based discharge instructions were at 46.7%. This compliance is more than doubled with electronic discharge documentation (relative risk 2.09, 95%CI 1.75-2.48) [2]; however, there were no statistically significant differences in documentation of patient care instructions nor diagnosis between paper-based and electronic formats.
  • In a 2015 study entitled Readability of patient discharge instructions with and without the use of electronically available disease-specific templates, patient readability of a web based discharge module, which has diagnosis-specific templated discharge instructions, was assessed. Patients had better readability with electronic templated discharge instructions than those that were clinician-generated (p< .001). Furthermore, the primary reason doctors created discharge instructions by themselves was due to lack of disease specific template availability.

The most exciting time in medicine is now, where the application of information technology during vulnerable transitions can provide a patient more complete information that he/she can actually act upon. Taken together, these studies suggest enhancement of both comprehensiveness and comprehension; the former very important for the primary care physician who will assume care of this patient status post hospitalization and the latter important for the patient’s overall health literacy necessary for improvement. The next logical extension is to have web based applications assist a patient in the transition from the hospital to the outpatient setting, something that innovative companies like Wellpepper are doing.

References

  1. Nielsen-Bohlman, L.; Panzer, AM.; Kindig, DA. Health literacy: A prescription to end confusion. National Academies Press; Washington, DC: 2004.
  2. Bell EJ et al. Information Technology Improves Emergency Department Patient Discharge Instructions Completeness and Performance on a National Quality Measure: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Appl Clin Inform. 2013; 4(4): 499–514.
  3. Mueller SK et al. Readability of patient discharge instructions with and without the use of electronically available disease-specific templates. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015; 22(4): 857-63.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Patient Satisfaction

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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Wellpepper attends Episodes of Care Summit at Cambia Grove

Last week, Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler and I attended a half-day Episodes of Care Summit put on by Cambia Grove. It was great to see payers, providers and technologists come together to focus on initiatives that directly impact the patient experience. Here are some of our takeaways:

Horizon BCBS of New Jersey is an episodes of care pioneer

Focus on retroactive bundles before proactive. Episodes of care and bundled payments are often used interchangeably. An episode of care typically refers to a payment made retrospectively while a bundled payment typically refers to a payment made prospectively. Horizon BCBS of New Jersey first launched retrospective pilots in 2010 (total hip and total knee replacements). In this model, savings are shared with the physician or practice once quality benchmarks and patient experience thresholds are met and costs come in below budget. After 7 years of scale and success, Horizon is now launching more immediate, risk-based, prospective initiatives in 2017.

Drive success through quality. Horizon piloted with over 200 quality metrics with member-specific, risk-adjusted financial targets. Metrics are key in driving success. Identify 3-5 standard quality metrics and 2-4 episode-specific metrics.

Community involvement is imperative

It’s great to see continued focus on community involvement in innovation and healthcare. The Bree Collaborative is an excellent example of bringing together community and industry leaders to identify and promote strategies that directly impact patient outcomes, quality and affordability. Wellpepper firmly believes in the work that the Bree Collaborative is doing. In fact, our total joint and lumbar fusion care plans follow Bree recommendations.

The Episodes of Care Summit held breakout sessions that mapped out the ideal episode of care/bundle experience through the lens of people, process and technology. Think of people, process and technology as a three-legged table. Remove one leg and the table falls. If the three legs are not the same size, the table does not function properly. Effort needs to be allocated equally across people, processes and technology to drive behavior change. Reimbursement seemed to take a precedence in every conversation rather than the patient’s needs or the provider’s care. Until this mindset is fixed, it’s hard to focus on what healthcare is really about. Dr. Hugh Stanley, from the Bree Collaborative did an excellent job bringing the focus of the conversation back to the patient.

Memorable quotes from breakout sessions:

  • “Patients need to be at the center of episodes of care.”
  • “We need to capture patient satisfaction in real time.”
  • “I’m blown away I can get more info on a dog bed than a provider.”
  • “We need to rebuild the patient deductible and copay mindset.”
  • “The payer community has a responsibility to share information to publicize data that drives provider readiness.”
  • “Creating episodes vs bundles benefits providers and ultimately patients.”

Posted in: Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Uncategorized

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Using AWS with HIPAA-Protected Data – A Practical Primer

When we started building the Wellpepper platform four years ago, we thought carefully about how to build for privacy and security best practices as well as HIPAA compliance, since we work with customers in the healthcare industry. We chose to build the system entirely on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and learned a few things in the process about building HIPAA compliant applications on AWS. Hopefully this will be helpful to others considering AWS as the home for their healthcare online service, whether you’re a software company hoping to sell to healthcare systems (as a “Business Associate” in HIPAA terminology) or an internal development team at a health system (a “Covered Entity”).

It’s Not Rocket Science

As you probably already know, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is made up of several parts. Usually when IT people talk about “HIPAA compliance”, they are talking about the Title II Security Rule which governs privacy and security practices for electronic protected health information (ePHI).

Many of the requirements in the HIPAA Security Rule are simply best practices for security and data privacy that have been written into law. Things like encrypting traffic travelling over a network. Anyone building good, secure software, should be following these principles anyway. You need to be informed of the requirements, and you need to make sure you establish ongoing practices for maintaining security and privacy, but it’s not rocket science. In fact, your health system (or healthcare customers) may actually have more stringent or additional data security requirements to what is required by HIPAA.

Our experience is that HIPAA isn’t a major departure from what we would have built anyway.

Stay Up To Date

HIPAA was established in 1996, with the final Security Rule being published in 2003. In some cases, the guidance has not kept up with current threats and practices in 2017. If you are developing healthcare software, you should be applying industry best practices in combination with the HIPAA requirements. Your ultimate goal needs to be protecting patient data, not just regulatory compliance. Invest in training yourself and your team and staying current. Some resources we found helpful:

Take Responsibility

Compliance usually isn’t at the top of an engineering team’s list of fun things, so it’s tempting to look for solutions that can abstract away the responsibility. There are a few online healthcare platform-as-a-service hosters that make claims in this direction. Be wary of these. No service can remove your responsibility for compliance.

We decided that using AWS infrastructure services was the best level of abstraction. This let us build new services, host data, and install 3rd party applications in our VPC with high confidence that we were living up to our promises to protect patient data.

In addition to thinking about your software solution, compliance also covers your business practices and policies for things like training, background checks, and corporate device security – securing your people. These are often overlooked areas that are really important, since security researchers complain that people are the weakest link in the security chain. As with your software design, the application of commonsense practices and good documentation will go a long way.

There is no single group that certifies systems as HIPAA compliant. However, HHS can audit you at any time, whether you’re a covered entity or a business associate. You should do your own internal assessments against the HIPAA Security Rule both when you are building new capabilities, and on an annual basis. Augment this with external third party reviews. You’ll want to be able to show summarized reports of both your internal process and a stamp of approval from an external auditor.

HHS produces a tool called the SRA tool which you might find useful in performing security rule assessments: https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/security-risk-assessment-tool. We used this for a couple years, but now just use an Excel Spreadsheet to evaluate ourselves. Bonus: this is probably what your auditor will want to see.

This Risk Toolkit from the HIPAA Collaborative of Wisconsin is a good starting point, and looks very similar to the spreadsheet we use: http://hipaacow.org/resources/hipaa-cow-documents/risk-toolkit/ (look at the Risk Assessment Template).

Share the Responsibility

AWS certifies a subset of their services for HIPAA compliance. This includes restrictions on how these services are used, and requires that you enter into a Business Associate Agreement (BAA) with AWS. This agreement establishes the legal relationship needed to handle ePHI, and ensures that you’ll be notified in the unlikely event that there is a data breach.

When you sign a BAA, you enter into a shared responsibility model with AWS to protect ePHI. AWS largely covers physical security for their facilities and networks. You can view their SOC audit results on request. You own the security for your applications and anything else from the OS on up. For example, if you use Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, it’s your responsibility to keep those instances patched.

AWS occasionally adds new services to their HIPAA-certified services, so you’ll want to check occasionally to see if there are new services you might be able to take advantage of.

Draw a Bright Line Around Your ePHI

At any time, you should be able to quickly say exactly which parts of your system (which servers, which network segments, which databases, which services) have or store ePHI. These systems are inside your bright line defense perimeter, are subject to HIPAA regulations including breach notifications. That means if you lose data on one of these systems, you need to notify your patients (or if you are a Business Associate, notify the Covered Entity so that they can notify the patients).

EC2, Simple Storage System (S3), Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), when used in accordance with guidelines can be HIPAA compliant. Make sure you read the guidelines – there are usually certain restrictions on usage in order to be covered. Many of AWS’ platform-as-a-service offerings are currently not offered under the AWS HIPAA umbrella (for example Kinesis and Lambda). You can still use these services, just not with ePHI.

Many modern systems designs make use of 3rd party framworks and SaaS offerings for things like analytics, monitoring, customer support, etc. When you are holding and conveying ePHI, you will need to be careful about which dependencies you take. For example, in one of our recent product updates we were considering using an external web & mobile analytics platform to better understand our traffic patterns. We walked through our use cases and decided that while none of them required us to send any ePHI to the analytics platform, the risk of accidentally sending some piece of protected data was too high. So we came up with a different plan that allowed us to keep PHI within our safe boundary and under our direct control. Many of your decisions will be grey-area tradeoffs like this.

Secure at Rest and Over the Wire

This is often the first question we see on any healthcare IT security review. How do you protect data at rest and over the wire? Use strong SSL certs with robust SSL termination implementations like ELB. If you terminate your own SSL connections, they need to be well patched due to evolving threats like Heartbleed, POODLE, etc. You may choose to do further application-level encryption in addition to SSL, but SSL should usually be sufficient to satisfy the over-the-wire encryption requirements.

For at-rest storage, there are many options (symmetric/asymmetric) that will depend on what you are trying to do. As a baseline, AWS makes it incredibly easy to encrypt data with AES-256 both in S3 or in the Elastic Block Store (EBS) drives attached to your EC2 instances. There’s almost no reason not to use this, even if you are using additional encryption in other layers of your architecture. AES-256 is usually the “right answer” for IT reviews. Don’t use smaller keys, don’t use outdated algorithms, and especially never try to roll your own encryption.

Good guidance in this area is easy to find:

Logging and Auditing

A key HIPAA requirement is being able to track who accessed and changed patient records and verify the validity of a record. Even if you don’t make this available through a user interface, you need to log these actions and be able to produce a report in the case of an audit or a breach. Keeping these logs in encrypted storage in S3 is a good way to do this. You’ll want to restrict who has access to read/write these audit logs as well.

In addition to automatic audit trails generated by your application-level software systems, remember to carefully keep track of business-process events like granting someone access to a system or revoking access. AWS CloudTrail can help track system changes made to AWS resources like servers, S3 buckets, etc.

Authentication

All healthcare applications will need a way to identify their users and what permissions those users have. HIPAA is not specific about authentication systems beyond being “reasonable and appropriate” (164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D)), but does require that you have good policies in place for this. Here you should follow well-established security best practices.

For starters, you should try not to build your own authentication system. In purpose-built systems, you may be able to integrate into an existing authentication system using oAuth, or SAML (or maybe something more exotic if you’re plugging into some legacy healthcare application). In patient-facing applications, you may be able to integrate with a patient portal for credentials – this is something that will probably show up on your requirements list at some point anyway. If neither of these apply, you may be able to use another identity provider like AWS’ Identity and Access Management (IAM) system to manage user credentials. We briefly tried using consumer-facing oAuth using Facebook, but quickly found that consumers are (rightly) worried about privacy and chose not to use this method.

If you find that you need to build an authentication system, be sure to follow current best practices on things like how to store passwords securely, as well as other tricky areas like password resets.

Since Wellpepper is often deployed standalone before being integrated into other back-end systems, we offer a built-in username + password authentication system. One silver lining to building this ourselves is the ability to build meaningful password complexity rules, especially for patients. Some of the traditional healthcare systems have truly draconian rules that are not only user un-friendly, but actively user-hostile. Thankfully, the best practices in this area are changing. Even the draft NIST password recommendations, updated in August 2016, trade some of the human-unfriendly parts of passwords (multiple character classes) for more easily memorable, but still secure ones (length). Also, consider the difference between health-system password requirements for clinicians with access to thousands of records and those for patients who only access a single record.

Once your users are authenticated, they will need to be authorized to access some set of resources. As with authentication, if you can delegate this responsibility to another established system, this is probably the best approach. If you are adding unique resources with unique access control rules, you will need to make sure that your authorization mechanisms are secure and auditable.

Conclusion

Creating a HIPAA-compliant service doesn’t have to be a big scary problem, but you do want to make sure you have your ducks in a row. If you’re reading this blog post (and hopefully others!), you’re off to a good start. Here are some additional resources that we found handy:

Posted in: Data Protection, Health Regulations, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Uncategorized

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Wellpepper Receives Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Healthcare Gold Award for Achievement in Digital Health

We are honored to have been named the Gold Award winner for outstanding achievement in digital health from Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care!

Thank you to our amazing team and partners!

 

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Press Release, Seattle, Uncategorized

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HIMSS17 Sessions of Interest

We are thrilled to attend a number of sessions at HIMSS17 with topics pertaining to Wellpepper’s Vision and Goals!

Patient Engagement

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver an engaging patient experience that helps people manage their care to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Insight from Data

Sessions that impact our ability to derive insight from data to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Clinical Experience

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver more efficient experience for existing workflows and are non-disruptive for new workflows:

 

Posted in: big data, Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement

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Our Picks for HIMSS17

himss17-exhibitor-ad-design-300x250-copyHIMSS17 is right around the corner and we at Wellpepper have a lot to be excited about! By empowering and engaging patients, deriving insight from the data we collect, and delivering new value to clinical users without major disruption to existing clinical workflows, we can continue to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. At HIMSS17, we look forward to connecting with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience.

Sessions that we look forward to:

Our CEO and co-founder, Anne Weiler, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Anne will be a featured speaker at the Venture+ Forum, where former competition winners will be sharing how their business has grown, lessons learned and plans for the future. Since being named a winner of the 2015 Venture+ Forum Pitch competition, Wellpepper has continued to bridge the gap between the patient and care team and we are excited to share our progress and vision.
  • Anne will also be presenting a session titled, Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors, which will explore the role of design-thinking in design empathetic applications to deliver remote care for seniors based on studies completed by Boston University and researchers from Harvard Medical School.

Patient engagement expert Jan Oldenburg, who was featured in our August 2016 webinar, will be speaking at 2 sessions:

  • Jan will be presenting a session titled, The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment. This session will highlight what it takes to create a truly participatory healthcare system that incorporates patients and caregivers, using digital health technology to reinforce and support participatory frameworks.
  • Jan will also be presenting a session titled, Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections. This session will focus on how Open Notes enhance the patient’s narrative of their journey through their condition and how this both strengthens the patient-physician relationship and empowers patients to take charge of their illness and wellness.

Christopher Ross, Chief Information Officer at Mayo Clinic will be leading a session on Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT. This session will discuss how the advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are having a profound impact on how insights are generated from healthcare data.

Posted in: big data, M-health, patient engagement

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MHealth and Big Data Are Catalysts for Personalized Patient Care

Although there are many complexities wrapped around our healthcare system, Stanford University’s 2016 Medicine X Conference starts finding solutions to improving patient care by focusing on increasing patient engagement and transforming how patients are treated in the system.

Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg, who spoke at MedX in September with digital health entrepreneur and physician Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, addressed several important aspects of big data collection.

“Collecting big data is like planting trees. You need to plant the seed of the process or tooling,” says Van Snelleberg. “Over time, this matures and produces data.”

Mr. Van Snellenberg, who has collected and analyzed patient data at Wellpepper, discovered several key aspects of data collection that could improve care continuity for both patient and providers. He shared this to his MedX audience.

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“Wellpepper has already uncovered new understandings about which patients are most adherent as well as indicators of readmissions,” says Van Snellenberg. “That’s very valuable information.”

“We’ve discovered that, as you collect patient-generated data, these types of insights as well indications about the effectiveness of certain clinical protocols will be available to you. This will help allow for providers to encourage positive patient behavior,” he stated.

Mr. Van Snellenberg spoke further at an interview in October about collecting and using patient-generated data.

 

Question: What groups can benefit off the collecting of big data?

Snellenberg: Collecting patient-generated data can ultimately produce better outcomes and patient care for hospital and clinics as well as the patients themselves. The more in quantity and detail, the better it is to help produce good results. Data collection has tremendous value that can allow hospitals and clinics to learn more about their patients in between hospital visits, thereby filling in missing gaps in patient information. We also realized that collecting big data can potentially prevent complications or readmissions by identifying warning flags before the patient needs to return to the clinic.

And as mentioned, analyzing big data has provided us insights about which patients are most adherent. For example, we have found that patients with 5-7 tasks are adherent while patients with 8-10 tasks are not.

 

Q: What are some things you have discovered using patient-generated data?

MS: We were able to make observations on the patterns. We also discovered a strong linear correlation between the level of pain and difficulty of patients.

Traditionally, patient data remained in the hospital. This often left big gaps in knowledge about the patient in between hospital visits. By collecting and data in between visits to the hospital, you can discover important correlations that would not have been discoverable without data.

 

Q: What are some possible methods to collect patient data?

MS: Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, who worked in digital health, suggested several programs such as Storyvine and AugMedix.

Usually, data is collected by patients recording symptoms and experiences on a daily basis in a consistent manner and then managed afterwards. For example, patients themselves tend to keep track of their progress in diaries or using the FitBit to record the number of steps and heart rate.

 

Q: What are some of the most unique aspects about this year’s MedX?

MS: One unique aspect about the MedX Conference is that it provided more opportunities for diverse voices to be heard in addition to health professionals – including a mix of health patients, providers, and educators.

The mindset was also encouraged to change. Some of the convention’s most progressive talks on stage happened when phrases such as “How might we…” and “Everybody included” are brought up in the discussion.

The term “Everyone included” came up most often, pushing for more perspectives outside of JUST the physicians. MedX’s solution-oriented focus proves to be heading down a successful route to improving patient care in the healthcare system as well as acting as the initiative to open doors for new voices to be heard.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, patient engagement, Research, Seattle

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Risk Taking Doesn’t Have to Be Scary

Taking risk is an important part of being human, in order for us to succeed or get what we want out of life, we have to take a path towards uncertainty. Minimizing risk or simply feeling more prepared, can be obtained through resourcefulness and can help us gain a level of confidence in order to take the next step. In the recent article written by our CEO Anne Weiler, she describes the pillars to her own decision making and how she has applied them to starting a healthcare technology company. Anne uses a simple analogy for risk evaluation; rock-climbing. How can this analogy help you with your next big decision?

Please read Anne’s article here and post any comments below. Are you evaluating taking a risk right now? We would love to hear your thoughts!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology

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