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Posts Tagged digital health

Simple Patient-Centered Design

At Wellpepper, we work hard to make sure our software is intuitive, including working with external academic researchers on randomized control trials for people who may have cognitive or other disabilities. This is both to make sure our software is easy-to-use for all abilities, and to overcome a frequent bias we hear about older people not being able to use applications, and also to provide valuable feedback. We’ve found from these studies, the results of which will be published shortly in peer-reviewed journals, that software can be designed for long-term adherence, and this adherence to programs can lead to clinically-meaningful patient outcome improvements.

User-centered design relies on three principles, all of which can be practiced easily, but require continual discipline to practice. It’s easy to assume you know how your users or patients will react either based on your own experiences, or based on prior knowledge. There’s really no substitute for direct experience though. When we practice user-centered design, we think about things from three aspects:

Immersion

Place ourselves in the full experience through the eyes of the user. This is possibly the most powerful way to impact user-centered design, but sometimes the most difficult. Virtual reality is proving to be a great way to experience immersion. At the Kaiser Permanente Center For Total Health in Washington, DC, participants experience a virtual reality tour by a homeless man showing where he sleeps and spends his days. It’s very powerful to be right there with him. While this is definitely a deep-dive immersion experience, there are other ways like these physical therapy students who learned what it was like to age through simple simulations like braces, and crutches. Changing the font size on your screens can be a really easy way to see whether your solution is useable by those with less than 20/20 vision. With many technology solutions being built by young teams, immersion can be a very powerful tool for usable and accessible software.

Observation

Carefully watch and examine what people are actually doing. It can be really difficult to do this without jumping in and explaining how to use your solution. An interesting way to get started with observation is to start before you start building a solution: go and visit your end-user’s environment and take notes, video, and pictures.

Understanding what is around them when they are using your solution may give you much greater insight. When possible we try to visit the clinic before a deployment of Wellpepper. Simple things like whether wifi is available, how busy the waiting room is, and who is initiating conversations with patients can help us understand how to better build administrative tools that fit into the clinician’s workflow. Once you’ve started with observing your users where they will use your solution, the next step is to have them test what you’ve built. Again, it doesn’t have to be complicated. Starting with asking them how they think they would use paper wireframes or voice interface testing with Wizard of Oz scenarios can get you early feedback before you become too attached to your creations.

Conversation

Accurately capture conversations and personal stories. The personal stories will give you insight into what’s important to your users, and also uncover things that you can’t possibly know just by looking at usage data. Conversations can help you with this. The great thing about conversations is that they are an easy way to share feedback with team members who can’t be there, and personal stories help your team converge around personas. We’ve found personal stories to be really helpful in thinking about software design, in particular understanding how to capture those personal stories from patients right in the software by letting them set and track progress against their own personal goals.

Doctor’s often talk about how becoming a patient or becoming a care-giver for a loved one changes their experiences of healthcare and makes them better doctors. This is truly user-centered design, but deeply personal experience is not the only way to learn.

To learn more:

Check out the work Bon Ku, MD is doing at Jefferson University Hospital teaching design to physicians.

Visit the Kaiser Permanente Innovation Center.

Learn about our research with Boston University and Harvard to show patient adherence and outcome improvements.

Read these books from physicians who became patients.
In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Adwish, MD
When Breath Becomes Air Paul Kalanithi, MD

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Research

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Healthcare + A.I. Northwest

The Xconomy Healthcare + A.I. Northwest Conference at Cambia Grove featured speakers and panels discussing the opportunities and prospects for applying machine learning and artificial intelligence to find solutions for health care. The consensus was that we are no longer held back by a lack of technological understanding and ability. A.I. and M.L. models can be learned at a large scale by harnessing the power of the cloud and advances in data science. According to the panelists, today’s challenges to incorporating A.I. into healthcare include abundant, but inadequate data and resistance from health systems and providers.

Many researchers have found insufficient data to be an unexpected challenge. As keynote speaker Peter Lee of Microsoft Research pointed out, the more data we have, the better our machine learned models can be. He used an analogy to a speech identifier trained on multiple languages such that the model predicted English better after learning French to illustrate that improvements can be made with large sets of unstructured data. Unfortunately, because we are not capturing enough of the right kind of data for researchers, much patient data is getting lost in the “health data funnel” due to PHI and quality concerns. Lee called for more data sharing and data transparency at every level.

Physician researchers on multiple panels were concerned about a lack of suitable data. Soheil Meshinchi, a pediatric oncologist from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, is engaged in collecting data specific to children. He discussed his research on Acute Myeloid Leukemia on the panel titled, ‘Will A.I. Help Discover and Personalize the Next Breakthrough Therapy?’. While there is a large body of research on AML in adults, he has found that the disease behaves much differently at a genomic level in children. He also expressed distrust in some published research because studies are rarely reproduced and often a researcher who presents results contrary to existing research faces headwinds at journals who are reticent to publish “negative data”. His focus at this point is gathering as much data as he can.

Matthew Thompson, a physician researcher at the University of Washington School of Medicine, argued on the “Innovations for the Over-Worked Physician” panel that technology has made patient interaction demonstrably worse, but that these problems can and should be solved innovatively with artificial intelligence. His specific complaints include both inputting and extracting data from health system EHRs, as well as an overall glut of raw patient data, often generated by the patient himself, and far too much published research for clinicians to digest.

Both keynote speakers, Microsoft’s Lee and Oren Etzioni of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, referenced the large numbers of research papers published every year. According to Etzioni, the number of scientific papers published has doubled every nine years since World War II. Lee referenced a statistic that 4000 studies on precision cancer treatments are published each year. They are both relying on innovative machine reading techniques to analyze and categorize research papers to make them more available to physicians (and other scientists). Dr. Etzioni’s team has developed SemanticScholar.org to combat the common challenges facing those who look for research papers. He aims to reduce the number of citations they must follow while also identifying the most relevant and up-to-date research available. One of the advantages of taking this approach to patient data

is that scientific texts have no PHI concerns. Lee’s team is marrying patient data and machine reading to match potential research subjects with appropriate NIH studies.

Dr. Thompson was concerned that too much data is presented to the medical staff and very few of the “predictive rules” used by ER personnel are both ‘accurate and safe’. When reviewing patient outcomes and observations to predict the severity of an infection, he found that patients or their caregivers would provide ample information, but often clinicians would disregard certain details as noise because they were atypical symptoms. The amount of data that providers have to observe for a patient is massive, but machine learned models may be utilized to distill that data into the most relevant and actionable signals.

Before data is gathered and interpreted, it must be collected. Like Dr. Thompson, Harjinder Sandhu of Saykara sees ponderous, physician-driven data entry via EHR as significant barrier to efficient data collection. Sandhu notes that healthcare is the only industry where the highest-paid teammember is performing this onerous task and his company is using artificial intelligence to ease that burden on the physician.

Once patient data has been aggregated and processed into models, the challenge is getting the information in front of providers. This requires buy-in from the health system, physician, and, occasionally, the patient and his caregivers. Mary Haggard of Providence Health and Services spoke on the “Tech Entrepreneurs Journey into Healthcare” panel and stated that the biggest problem for entrepreneurs is defining the correct problem to solve. During the “Investment Perspective” panel, Matt Holman of Echo Health Ventures recommended tech startups emphasize an understanding of the context of the problem within a health system.

One of the most important and difficult hurdles for health technology companies is working into clinical workflow. Mike McSherry from Xealth has found that physician champions who know how they want to use technology help with integrating into a health system or physicians group. Lynn McGrath of Eigen Healthcare believes physicians want their data to be defined, quick to assess, condensed, and actionable, while Shelly Fitz points out that providers are not used to all the data they are receiving and they don’t yet know how to use it all. These are all issues that can and will be solved as healthcare technology continues to become more intelligent.

As Wellpepper’s CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg pointed out, health systems and doctors are resistant to “shiny new things”, for good reason. When approaching a health system, in addition to engaging the administration, clinicians need to understand why the machine learned model is recommending a given course of treatment. After integration, patients will also want to understand why a given course of treatment is being recommended. Applying artificial intelligence solutions to medicine must take into account the human element, as well.

The exciting possibilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning are hindered more by human constraints in health systems and data collection than by available technology. “Patients are throwing off all kinds of data when they’re not in the clinic,” according to our CTO. Wellpepper’s tools for capturing patient-generated data provide a pathway for providers to access actionable analysis.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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Falls Challenge

How might we enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls? We have entered a challenge with AARP and IDEO to bring our proven falls solutions to the masses. Along side our partners at Harvard and Boston University, we believe that using mobile technology to enhance and scale a proven falls prevention program will lead to better life by increasing access to care and decreasing costs.

The challenge started with over 220 submissions and recently weeded down to the top 40. We’re thrilled to have made the first cut. Our method is proven and we invite you to participate in the next round to refine our idea and help achieve greater impact.

Click here to check out our entry!

 

 

Posted in: Aging, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Research, Uncategorized

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Exposure at a digital health startup

Physicians typically endure years of training by being put in a pressure cooker with no safety valve. They persist through sheer brute force and discipline within a highly regulated, high barrier to entry industry. The high stakes culture of medicine often lends to emotional immaturity and an inability to relate to most of the world around. Ironic and sad, given that one of the core principles in patient care is to demonstrate empathy towards the human condition. The information asymmetry that exists between patient and provider further puts more onus on the physician to have character and compassion. In addition to being out of touch with reality, physicians also grapple with the changing times. Technological advancements and accessibility of information through technology has influenced the way physicians learn and practice medicine. Physicians who are uncomfortable with technology tend to find it harder to keep up with the latest innovations and research that affects patient care.

I chose to do a rotation at a digital health startup because of the fear of being disconnected and clueless. Plus there are a few other beliefs of mine that I wanted to more fully explore during my time at Wellpepper:

  • Understanding patients in the aggregate is important. Understanding what patients want, feel, and expect is not just an interesting data set, but is essential for me in providing optimal care. While a physician still deals with a patient one on one and the experience is influenced by patient characteristics, knowing the context in where the patient is coming from provides the best chance for an optimal encounter.
  • Technology that enhances the patient-physician relationship is a top priority. The physicians I have respected the most have tier 1 communication skills and relationships with their patients. A good relationship can literally bend the physics of the situation (e.g. that’s why doctors who have good bedside manner don’t get sued).
  • Technology that promotes value based care is the current landscape. It is no longer around the corner. Every stakeholder in healthcare is interested in improvement of care from an outcomes and cost perspective. Current practices in medicine are rapidly adapting in order to keep up.
  • Betting against yourself is a great strategy for growth. Based on the culture of medicine, it has always been more important for me to implement care that is standardized and in service of saving a patient’s life rather than considering how he/she feels. Something as simple as a patient having to give five histories within the same hospital admission is normal to me and also has value due to the difficulties in eliciting accurate information. But what if I considered that a patient doesn’t want to hear the same question repeatedly and that ultimately effects his/her perception of care? What if their lives were saved but they didn’t believe that anyone truly cared for them in the hospitalization? Would this be a meaningful experience, or a shallow one sided win? Challenging the way I think, the way I was indoctrinated into thinking and behaving, is something I look forward to in this process.

In summary, I chose to do a rotation at Wellpepper because I have a growth mindset. I want to consciously be a part of the most exciting time in medicine, where the hard work of innovative and creative minds improve patient lives.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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Wellpepper attends Episodes of Care Summit at Cambia Grove

Last week, Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler and I attended a half-day Episodes of Care Summit put on by Cambia Grove. It was great to see payers, providers and technologists come together to focus on initiatives that directly impact the patient experience. Here are some of our takeaways:

Horizon BCBS of New Jersey is an episodes of care pioneer

Focus on retroactive bundles before proactive. Episodes of care and bundled payments are often used interchangeably. An episode of care typically refers to a payment made retrospectively while a bundled payment typically refers to a payment made prospectively. Horizon BCBS of New Jersey first launched retrospective pilots in 2010 (total hip and total knee replacements). In this model, savings are shared with the physician or practice once quality benchmarks and patient experience thresholds are met and costs come in below budget. After 7 years of scale and success, Horizon is now launching more immediate, risk-based, prospective initiatives in 2017.

Drive success through quality. Horizon piloted with over 200 quality metrics with member-specific, risk-adjusted financial targets. Metrics are key in driving success. Identify 3-5 standard quality metrics and 2-4 episode-specific metrics.

Community involvement is imperative

It’s great to see continued focus on community involvement in innovation and healthcare. The Bree Collaborative is an excellent example of bringing together community and industry leaders to identify and promote strategies that directly impact patient outcomes, quality and affordability. Wellpepper firmly believes in the work that the Bree Collaborative is doing. In fact, our total joint and lumbar fusion care plans follow Bree recommendations.

The Episodes of Care Summit held breakout sessions that mapped out the ideal episode of care/bundle experience through the lens of people, process and technology. Think of people, process and technology as a three-legged table. Remove one leg and the table falls. If the three legs are not the same size, the table does not function properly. Effort needs to be allocated equally across people, processes and technology to drive behavior change. Reimbursement seemed to take a precedence in every conversation rather than the patient’s needs or the provider’s care. Until this mindset is fixed, it’s hard to focus on what healthcare is really about. Dr. Hugh Stanley, from the Bree Collaborative did an excellent job bringing the focus of the conversation back to the patient.

Memorable quotes from breakout sessions:

  • “Patients need to be at the center of episodes of care.”
  • “We need to capture patient satisfaction in real time.”
  • “I’m blown away I can get more info on a dog bed than a provider.”
  • “We need to rebuild the patient deductible and copay mindset.”
  • “The payer community has a responsibility to share information to publicize data that drives provider readiness.”
  • “Creating episodes vs bundles benefits providers and ultimately patients.”

Posted in: Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Uncategorized

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Using AWS with HIPAA-Protected Data – A Practical Primer

When we started building the Wellpepper platform four years ago, we thought carefully about how to build for privacy and security best practices as well as HIPAA compliance, since we work with customers in the healthcare industry. We chose to build the system entirely on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and learned a few things in the process about building HIPAA compliant applications on AWS. Hopefully this will be helpful to others considering AWS as the home for their healthcare online service, whether you’re a software company hoping to sell to healthcare systems (as a “Business Associate” in HIPAA terminology) or an internal development team at a health system (a “Covered Entity”).

It’s Not Rocket Science

As you probably already know, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is made up of several parts. Usually when IT people talk about “HIPAA compliance”, they are talking about the Title II Security Rule which governs privacy and security practices for electronic protected health information (ePHI).

Many of the requirements in the HIPAA Security Rule are simply best practices for security and data privacy that have been written into law. Things like encrypting traffic travelling over a network. Anyone building good, secure software, should be following these principles anyway. You need to be informed of the requirements, and you need to make sure you establish ongoing practices for maintaining security and privacy, but it’s not rocket science. In fact, your health system (or healthcare customers) may actually have more stringent or additional data security requirements to what is required by HIPAA.

Our experience is that HIPAA isn’t a major departure from what we would have built anyway.

Stay Up To Date

HIPAA was established in 1996, with the final Security Rule being published in 2003. In some cases, the guidance has not kept up with current threats and practices in 2017. If you are developing healthcare software, you should be applying industry best practices in combination with the HIPAA requirements. Your ultimate goal needs to be protecting patient data, not just regulatory compliance. Invest in training yourself and your team and staying current. Some resources we found helpful:

Take Responsibility

Compliance usually isn’t at the top of an engineering team’s list of fun things, so it’s tempting to look for solutions that can abstract away the responsibility. There are a few online healthcare platform-as-a-service hosters that make claims in this direction. Be wary of these. No service can remove your responsibility for compliance.

We decided that using AWS infrastructure services was the best level of abstraction. This let us build new services, host data, and install 3rd party applications in our VPC with high confidence that we were living up to our promises to protect patient data.

In addition to thinking about your software solution, compliance also covers your business practices and policies for things like training, background checks, and corporate device security – securing your people. These are often overlooked areas that are really important, since security researchers complain that people are the weakest link in the security chain. As with your software design, the application of commonsense practices and good documentation will go a long way.

There is no single group that certifies systems as HIPAA compliant. However, HHS can audit you at any time, whether you’re a covered entity or a business associate. You should do your own internal assessments against the HIPAA Security Rule both when you are building new capabilities, and on an annual basis. Augment this with external third party reviews. You’ll want to be able to show summarized reports of both your internal process and a stamp of approval from an external auditor.

HHS produces a tool called the SRA tool which you might find useful in performing security rule assessments: https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/security-risk-assessment-tool. We used this for a couple years, but now just use an Excel Spreadsheet to evaluate ourselves. Bonus: this is probably what your auditor will want to see.

This Risk Toolkit from the HIPAA Collaborative of Wisconsin is a good starting point, and looks very similar to the spreadsheet we use: http://hipaacow.org/resources/hipaa-cow-documents/risk-toolkit/ (look at the Risk Assessment Template).

Share the Responsibility

AWS certifies a subset of their services for HIPAA compliance. This includes restrictions on how these services are used, and requires that you enter into a Business Associate Agreement (BAA) with AWS. This agreement establishes the legal relationship needed to handle ePHI, and ensures that you’ll be notified in the unlikely event that there is a data breach.

When you sign a BAA, you enter into a shared responsibility model with AWS to protect ePHI. AWS largely covers physical security for their facilities and networks. You can view their SOC audit results on request. You own the security for your applications and anything else from the OS on up. For example, if you use Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, it’s your responsibility to keep those instances patched.

AWS occasionally adds new services to their HIPAA-certified services, so you’ll want to check occasionally to see if there are new services you might be able to take advantage of.

Draw a Bright Line Around Your ePHI

At any time, you should be able to quickly say exactly which parts of your system (which servers, which network segments, which databases, which services) have or store ePHI. These systems are inside your bright line defense perimeter, are subject to HIPAA regulations including breach notifications. That means if you lose data on one of these systems, you need to notify your patients (or if you are a Business Associate, notify the Covered Entity so that they can notify the patients).

EC2, Simple Storage System (S3), Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), when used in accordance with guidelines can be HIPAA compliant. Make sure you read the guidelines – there are usually certain restrictions on usage in order to be covered. Many of AWS’ platform-as-a-service offerings are currently not offered under the AWS HIPAA umbrella (for example Kinesis and Lambda). You can still use these services, just not with ePHI.

Many modern systems designs make use of 3rd party framworks and SaaS offerings for things like analytics, monitoring, customer support, etc. When you are holding and conveying ePHI, you will need to be careful about which dependencies you take. For example, in one of our recent product updates we were considering using an external web & mobile analytics platform to better understand our traffic patterns. We walked through our use cases and decided that while none of them required us to send any ePHI to the analytics platform, the risk of accidentally sending some piece of protected data was too high. So we came up with a different plan that allowed us to keep PHI within our safe boundary and under our direct control. Many of your decisions will be grey-area tradeoffs like this.

Secure at Rest and Over the Wire

This is often the first question we see on any healthcare IT security review. How do you protect data at rest and over the wire? Use strong SSL certs with robust SSL termination implementations like ELB. If you terminate your own SSL connections, they need to be well patched due to evolving threats like Heartbleed, POODLE, etc. You may choose to do further application-level encryption in addition to SSL, but SSL should usually be sufficient to satisfy the over-the-wire encryption requirements.

For at-rest storage, there are many options (symmetric/asymmetric) that will depend on what you are trying to do. As a baseline, AWS makes it incredibly easy to encrypt data with AES-256 both in S3 or in the Elastic Block Store (EBS) drives attached to your EC2 instances. There’s almost no reason not to use this, even if you are using additional encryption in other layers of your architecture. AES-256 is usually the “right answer” for IT reviews. Don’t use smaller keys, don’t use outdated algorithms, and especially never try to roll your own encryption.

Good guidance in this area is easy to find:

Logging and Auditing

A key HIPAA requirement is being able to track who accessed and changed patient records and verify the validity of a record. Even if you don’t make this available through a user interface, you need to log these actions and be able to produce a report in the case of an audit or a breach. Keeping these logs in encrypted storage in S3 is a good way to do this. You’ll want to restrict who has access to read/write these audit logs as well.

In addition to automatic audit trails generated by your application-level software systems, remember to carefully keep track of business-process events like granting someone access to a system or revoking access. AWS CloudTrail can help track system changes made to AWS resources like servers, S3 buckets, etc.

Authentication

All healthcare applications will need a way to identify their users and what permissions those users have. HIPAA is not specific about authentication systems beyond being “reasonable and appropriate” (164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D)), but does require that you have good policies in place for this. Here you should follow well-established security best practices.

For starters, you should try not to build your own authentication system. In purpose-built systems, you may be able to integrate into an existing authentication system using oAuth, or SAML (or maybe something more exotic if you’re plugging into some legacy healthcare application). In patient-facing applications, you may be able to integrate with a patient portal for credentials – this is something that will probably show up on your requirements list at some point anyway. If neither of these apply, you may be able to use another identity provider like AWS’ Identity and Access Management (IAM) system to manage user credentials. We briefly tried using consumer-facing oAuth using Facebook, but quickly found that consumers are (rightly) worried about privacy and chose not to use this method.

If you find that you need to build an authentication system, be sure to follow current best practices on things like how to store passwords securely, as well as other tricky areas like password resets.

Since Wellpepper is often deployed standalone before being integrated into other back-end systems, we offer a built-in username + password authentication system. One silver lining to building this ourselves is the ability to build meaningful password complexity rules, especially for patients. Some of the traditional healthcare systems have truly draconian rules that are not only user un-friendly, but actively user-hostile. Thankfully, the best practices in this area are changing. Even the draft NIST password recommendations, updated in August 2016, trade some of the human-unfriendly parts of passwords (multiple character classes) for more easily memorable, but still secure ones (length). Also, consider the difference between health-system password requirements for clinicians with access to thousands of records and those for patients who only access a single record.

Once your users are authenticated, they will need to be authorized to access some set of resources. As with authentication, if you can delegate this responsibility to another established system, this is probably the best approach. If you are adding unique resources with unique access control rules, you will need to make sure that your authorization mechanisms are secure and auditable.

Conclusion

Creating a HIPAA-compliant service doesn’t have to be a big scary problem, but you do want to make sure you have your ducks in a row. If you’re reading this blog post (and hopefully others!), you’re off to a good start. Here are some additional resources that we found handy:

Posted in: Data Protection, Health Regulations, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Uncategorized

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Wellpepper Receives Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Healthcare Gold Award for Achievement in Digital Health

We are honored to have been named the Gold Award winner for outstanding achievement in digital health from Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care!

Thank you to our amazing team and partners!

 

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Press Release, Seattle, Uncategorized

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SEATTLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE HONORS 18 INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS AT THE 2017 LEADERS IN HEALTH CARE AWARDS

SEATTLE (March 2, 2017) – Eighteen of Washington’s most accomplished health care leaders were recognized at Seattle Business magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care Awards gala March 2 at Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

“In this time of great turmoil in the health care industry, it’s more important than ever to recognize the institutions and individuals who are doing so much to make Washington state among the best places in the nation to receive health care,” said Leslie Helm, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Judges selected gold and silver award honorees in 11 categories. The awards program was supported by presenting sponsor West Monroe and supporting sponsors Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and MacDonald-Miller.

The award winners are:

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — SEATTLE GOLD: Norm Hubbard, Executive Vice President, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle SILVER: Cynthia J. Hecker, Executive Director, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL CENTER EXECUTIVE — OUTSIDE SEATTLE GOLD: Preston Simmons, Chief Operating and Administrative Officer, Western Washington Market, Providence Health & Services, Everett SILVER: Bryce Helgerson, President, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL GROUP EXECUTIVE GOLD: Dr. Albert Fisk, Chief Medical Officer, The Everett Clinic, Everett

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Jeffrey Tomlin, SVP & Chief Medical and Quality Officer, EvergreenHealth, Kirkland

OUTSTANDING MEDICAL DIRECTOR/CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER GOLD: Dr. Peter McGough, Medical Director, UW Neighborhood Clinics, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOLD: Pacific Medical Centers, Seattle

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIGITAL HEALTH GOLD: Wellpepper, Seattle SILVER: SCI Solutions, Seattle

INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY GOLD: Navos, Seattle/Burien SILVER: Genoa, Tukwila

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GOLD: Seattle Genetics, Bothell

ACHIEVEMENT IN MEDICAL RESEARCH GOLD: Dr. Oliver Press, Acting Director, Clinical Research Division, and Acting SVP, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle SILVER: Dr. Jane Buckner, President, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle

MEDICAL GROUP PERFORMANCE (in partnership with Washington Health Alliance) GOLD: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle SILVER: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle

JUDGES’ AWARD Dr. Paul Ramsey, CEO, UW Medicine

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Read more about the Leaders in Health Care Awards 2017 at seattlebusinessmag.com.

ABOUT SEATTLE BUSINESS: Seattle Business is an award-winning monthly magazine read by thousands of business executives across the state. It delivers insight into the key people, enterprises and trends that drive business in the Pacific Northwest, providing perspective on the region’s ever-changing economic environment.

Posted in: M-health, patient engagement, Press Release

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HIMSS17 Checklist

HIMSS17 is only a few days away and we at Wellpepper have our checklist complete!

  • Coffee
  • Chocolate
  • Wellpepper swag bags
  • iOS and Android devices
  • List of partners, colleagues and friends to meet with
  • Wellpepper CEO, Anne Weiler‘s awesome sessions on the books

Venture+ Forum

Designing Empathetic Care Through Telehealth for Seniors

The “P” is for Participation, Partnering and Empowerment

Importance of Narrative: Open Notes, Patient Stories, Human Connections

Emerging Impacts of Artificial Intelligence on Healthcare IT

  • Twitter account primed to follow the following hashtags:

#Engage4Health

#HITcloud

#WomenInHIT

#EmpowerHIT

#Connected2Health

#Aim2Innovate

#PutData2Work

#HX360

#HITventure

#IHeartHIT

See you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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HIMSS17 Sessions of Interest

We are thrilled to attend a number of sessions at HIMSS17 with topics pertaining to Wellpepper’s Vision and Goals!

Patient Engagement

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver an engaging patient experience that helps people manage their care to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Insight from Data

Sessions that impact our ability to derive insight from data to improve outcomes and lower cost:

Clinical Experience

Sessions that impact our ability to deliver more efficient experience for existing workflows and are non-disruptive for new workflows:

 

Posted in: big data, Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, M-health, patient engagement

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Digital Health and the Influence on Healthcare: Wearables, Telehealth, & Treatment

Things are looking up in the world of digital health at least this was the view from “Digital Health and the Influence on Healthcare: Wearables, Telehealth, & Treatment.” The WBBA held their last event of the season with a panel on digital health, hosted by Russell Benaroya, CEO of Everymove, and featuring Dr. John Scott, Director of Telemedicine at UW Medicine, Davide Vigano CEO and co-founder of Sensoria, Mike Blume, independent healthcare consultant, and myself. I’d characterize the overall event as being optimistic and realistic, both from the panel and the attendees.

Digital health event

It was a dark and stormy night

No one said that the road to digital health was easy or fast, but the consensus that things like moving to the cloud, and the acceptance and adoption of patient-driven digital care is reaching a turning point.

Both Sensoria and Wellpepper’s business models are made possible by the cloud. For Sensoria this was the ability to process millions of datapoints coming from their wearable technology. For Wellpepper, this is our ability to rapidly implement solutions working with department heads facing a particular challenge in patient engagement and outcome tracking and improvement. Dr. Scott remarked on the dramatic drop in the cost of telemedicine solutions over the years he’s been an advocate and solutions due to both Moore’s Law and cloud computing over his tenure running telemedicine at UW.

Sensoria's Quantified Socks

Sensoria’s Quantified Socks

As well, although Dr. Scott highlighted how telemedicine was limited by arcane reimbursement models that did not allow for patients to receive telemedicine consults in their homes, he and other panelists discussed that they were not waiting for billing codes to do the right things in using technology to deliver better care. As usual, the Affordable Care Act was seen as a big driver as patient-centered and digital care.

Possibly because there were two ex-Microsoftees on the panel (Davide and me) a cloud-based platform approach was touted as the best way to both collect, analyze, and sort the data that came in directly from patients. In the case of Sensoria and Davide, this was to look for trends and patterns coming from sensor-integrated clothing, and in the case of Wellpepper it was to collect patient outcomes in the context of care and compare these across patients, procedures, and healthcare organizations.

This view led to a discussion about the proliferation of data, and everyone agreed that digital health has the ability to overwhelm health systems with data that they are currently not prepared for. EMRs are not set up to include sensor or patient-reported data, and as Dr. Scott pointed out, physicians are not looking for every data point on a patient, only the anomalies, like glucose out of range.

One audience member asked about whether healthcare organizations had an overall data strategy, and whether digital health data should be collected as part of that. It’s an interesting idea to consider but it seems like it’s still a long way off in healthcare. Does your organization or CIO have an overall data strategy? It seems that quality measures and the need for patient reported outcomes are introducing new requirements for data, but this is at the departmental or initiative level. Grappling with questions like this will be important as connected devices, digital, health, and patient reported outcomes enter the mainstream.

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Outcomes, Telemedicine

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Postcards from HIMSS M-Health 2015

HIMSS M-HealthIt’s been a busy couple of weeks at Wellpepper with both the AAKHS annual conference and HIMSS M-Health Summit at the Gaylord Convention Center in National Harbor where Wellpepper was honored to have won the Venture+ Pitch along with CirrusMD. This was our second year attending the conference and we noticed that the hype for digital health is a bit lower and perhaps that represents market maturity. It could also be that organizations are in the thick of implementation and don’t have the success stories to tell yet. We believe in digital health and are rolling up our sleeves so will take this feeling that we are moving to incremental change as a positive sign.

Venture+: The Market Is Maturing

We participated in the Venture+ Pitch last year as well which was won by fellow our fellow Springboard Alumna Prima-Temp. Prima-Temp was the clear winner last year, already raising their Series B. However, there were a ton of startups with only an idea. This year the criteria was that startups have revenue before applying, and the competition was held in two parts, the first an invitation-only session where 11 startups pitched and panelists talked about the market opportunity in general, and then a final round with 4 excellent startups and really tough questions from the judges. We were a bit earlier on our journey than a couple of the other startups in the final pitch so were honored to be recognized along with CirrusMD.Clinic of the Past and Present

Interestingly the startup area on the tradeshow floor was almost entirely made up of a new class of startups. So, while the market for M-Health may be maturing somewhat, there are still new entrants attracted by the promise of disruption.

Incremental Progress and Show Me The Evidence

I was only able to attend Day 1 Keynotes, and I heard that the Day 2 keynotes were great, especially by Shahram Ebadollahi of IBM Watson Healthcare. On Day 1, with the exception of an excellent presentation from Dr. Wood from Mayo Center for Innovation (disclosure: as part of winning the Mayo ThinkBig challenge we have the opportunity to work with CFI for the next year), most of the presentations were quite low-key. The main problem was the voice of the patient was missing: the focus was on initiatives or technology. I timed it. 1.5 hours into the keynote and we heard the first end-user story, and it wasn’t really a patient, it was a blind runner who used FitBit.

Dr. Wood shook everyone out of complacency and called out for a faster adoption of healthcare innovation, pointing out how basic things like patient treatment rooms have not changed dramatically in the last 50 years. He asked the audience to consider going beyond patient-reported outcomes and consider the outcomes that matter to patients. What would the system look like if we paid for health rather than healthcare, and we paid based on people being able to reach their own self-defined goals? Digital health is an enabler of this new system, but really, it’s about taking a patient or people-centered approach to health and to care.

What Patients WantAgain, maybe it’s a sign of market maturity, but the conference this year seemed more evolutionary rather than revolutionary. Themes from previous years were expanded on. For example, Judy Murphy of IBM talked about how consumer expectations expectations are fueling demand for m-health. People expect the same level of transparent and always available technology to manage their healthcare as they get from any other consumer experience.

HoneyBee and IPSOs announced the launch of the Global M-Health Survey which also pointed to ubiquity and consumer expectations and desire for M-Health. (The final survey results will be available in Q1.)

In a number of sessions Apple Research Kit was heralded as a major breakthrough for clinical trials. While the speed with which Research Kit was able to sign up study participants is certainly turning traditional research recruits on its head, the same limitations are still there: no HIPAA-compliant server infrastructure and selection-bias for those with more expensive devices. Interestingly, one of the greatest benefits for researchers seems to be the standardization of the informed consent process. (Note that Duke University will be open-sourcing the platform infrastructure they built in recognition that not all organizations have the skills and resources to build something like that.)

Interesting, how what was deemed such a major innovation at the time of release (less than a year ago), also seems a bit incremental. Again, we will take the glass-half full approach and say that we are reaching a market maturity where the gains are more incremental, although at next year’s conference we would really like to see more clinically-validated mobile health applications, and also more patient stories, preferably told by the patients themselves.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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My Life with Trackers

My Facebook and Twitter feeds are full of people talking about the new gadgets they got for Christmas. Tracking has gone mainstream as many of those gadgets are fitness and activity tracker devices. I thought I’d share a bit about what I’ve learned as an avid tracker for some of these newbies.

I have been using apps and devices to track my activities for over 7 years. When Nike in-shoe sensors came on the market in 2006, I was an early adopter and since then have upgraded to various GPS watches and apps like RunKeeper on my phone. I love tracking my runs and hikes. It adds an extra sense of accomplishment seeing exactly how far you’ve gone, elevation climbed and how fast you’ve traveled. Seeing my progress overtime was especially motivating and helpful when training for upcoming races.  It led me to want to track more. I definitely felt myself getting caught up in the quantified self movement.

flex

Fitbit Flex

So when we decided to get Fitbit trackers at Wellpepper, I was all over it. I was very excited to start tracking activities outside of runs.  I chose the wristband format while Mike and Anne chose the Fitibt Zips that clip onto your pocket or waistband. I liked the idea wearing the Fitbit at all times tracking all activities (including sleep) and thought I would have a better chance of not losing it. We found this to be true right away as Mike lost his first two Fitbits.  (Protip: Clip your Fitbit with your Fitbit inside your pocket.) Anne wasn’t too keen on the look of the sporty black wristband so chose the smaller out of sight zip and also appreciated that the Zip didn’t need to be charged. (However, both Anne and Mike had over a week of no activity recorded when their batteries actually died.)

Fitbit Zip

Fitbit Zip

Initial findings were very fun and intriguing: an Ultimate Frisbee game is about 8,000 steps and a good round of golf about 18,000 steps with up to 20,000 steps if that happened to be a bad round of golf. The most lucrative activity turned out to be dancing, it’s surprising how many steps you can take while dancing at a wedding! (23k)  Step counts varied between the different Fitbit types. As my steps were tracked by the movement of my arm, I definitely got credit for additional steps including a few 1000 from petting an upset dog during a thunderstorm. This caused some debates over the accuracy and fairness of the Wellpepper Fitbit leaderboard, which is definitely a fun and motivating feature of the Fitbit app. 

Fitbit 3Definitely the most surprising findings were how many steps could add up with regular day to day activities.   I found that I generally took around 1000 steps just walking around the house and getting ready in the morning.  A walk to the store to grab a few groceries could garner up to 2000 steps. Turn that trip into a walk to the farmer’s market and you could easily generate 4k steps! It was surprising how a few small decisions could turn a relatively normal day into highly productive and active day.  I found this infographic: The Exercise Experiment: A Tale of Two Days does a great job of showing the difference small choices can make.

Even more surprising, or even shocking, was how many steps I didn’t take on an inactive day.  I work from home and it’s not uncommon for me to grab a cup of coffee in the morning, jump on my laptop and get to work. Some days, the time can slip by and before you know it, the day is gone.  I never used to worry about it because when I am not working, I am highly active. However, after I came across The Truth about Sitting, I decided I needed to be more aware of my overall activity. I think this has been the greatest impact of the Fitbit. I thought that I might dive deeper into analyzing my runs or hikes, but it has actually created this awareness to keep me moving all the time. It reminded me of something John Mattison (CIMO of Kaiser Permanente) said at FutureMed:

It’s not about wearing a million sensors, we don’t need digital nannies, it’s about becoming more mindful.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, M-health

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