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Seattle Health Meetup: Focus on Consumer Health and Wellness Technology Sector

Less than a year ago, I was at an event sponsored by the Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association, where a room full of health IT and consumer health startup CEOs bemoaned the lack of a healthtech community in Seattle. We have all the elements here: talent, world-class healthcare facilities, and b2b or enterprise IT pedigree. Events like Seattle’s Health Innovators Forum Meetup and Health 2.0 are trying to change that by bringing together startups, investors, and general health enthusiasts for learning and sharing. This month’s Health Meetup, organized by Edmund Butler, was focused on Consumer Health and Wellness, and featured local startups in this space. Speakers were:

54824v1-max-250x250Marcelo Calbucci (@calbucci) is Co-Founder and CTO of Everymove, a company that automatically integrates data from various fitness trackers and provides consumer rewards from its partners.

 

 

 

Julie Kientz (@juliekientz) is the director of the Computing for Healthy Living and Learning Lab (CHiLL), a group of UW researchers interested in designing, developing, and evaluating apps that aim to promote healthy lifestyles and education.

 

 

Rebecca Norlander (@rebatwork) is the Co-Founder and CEO of Health123,  a consumer health company that helps people make decisions and track the small changes in their lives that can make a big difference in their health.

The three speakers shared a passion for designing person friendly applications for consumers to manage and improve their health. The three talks provided different perspectives on the topics of how to engage users and overcome their barriers or burdens to both application use and improving their health.

Marcelo kicked it off with his “8 Pet Peeves of Health Apps.” (I’m sensing an Everymove love of numbers as I also attended another talk by CEO Russell Benaroya called 25 Reasons You Suck At Sales. They also like to have provocative titles. 😉 )

Here they are in order:

    1. Calling people patients. Marcello pointed out that for all other applications they are users. He prefers people or member. (Later Rebecca noted that some industry conventions need to stay in order to communicate with your target customer. Patients is a tough one. People don’t like to be called patients, but the entire healthcare industry refers to them this way.)
    2. Trying to be all things to all people. This was a criticism of apps that try to track too many things. Figure out what behavior you’re trying to affect and do a great job of that.
    3. Putting the organization rather than the person at the center. This would be designing for the healthcare organization rather than the patient or worse yet for the insurance company rather than the patient.
    4. Misaligned or misguided incentives. Marcelo used the example of paying people to track something for example finding out their BMI rather than trying to incent them to change something, like become more active (and then lose weight). Historically there has been an idea in the health and wellness area that if you have information you will change. Information is really only one component (as Julie elaborated on in her session).
    5. Health Risk Assessments. Marcelo thought that these were particularly dangerous as people tend to associate these types of assessments with tests and then inflate their answers and then assume they are healthier than they thought.
    6. Bad UX and bad visual design. Marcelo showed an EMR screenshot saying “the 90s called, they want their interface back”.
EMR Screenshot

Source, Microwize.com.

  1. Treating a person as a condition. The person’s condition is not who they are and is only one component of the information a healthcare provider or application needs to understand to care for or help support that person.
  2. Making you change to fit the application or service. Wearables still fall into this category. You need to remember them, you need to wear them, and in the case of the new FitBit force, you need to get medical attention after wearing them.

Julie Kientz was up next, and her human-centered design approach provided practical advice to solve many of the pet peeves that Marcelo mentioned. The goal of Julie’s research is to understand and reduce the burdens in healthcare design. She described 8 key burdens that can impact adoption of healthcare technology.

Physical: Is the technology comfortable to use or to wear? Does it fit in with my surroundings or what I am doing? With wearables, physical is obvious, but physical could also be how you access the application, for example which tasks are better for a mobile device versus a PC?

Privacy: Where does the data go? Who is able to see it? For applications that have social sharing, are others able to track you? (Did you call in sick and then go for a 15K run?)

Mental: How do you feel about the technology? Julie said she feels sad when she forgets to put her FitBit on, and often goes back home to get it. As well, she is on her 6th FitBit in 3.5 years due to losing them, so is also feeling some guilt about the loss.

Access: Is the technology designed for diversity? For example, many nutrition trackers do not include foods that are popular with different ethnic groups.

Time: How much effort is required to enter or review data? Julie personally doesn’t look at her FitBit data online, just at the step count on the display. The online reporting is too much effort for her.

Emotional: What is the emotional impact of not meeting the goals the technology is tracking? Do you feel like a failure?

Financial: How much does it cost? Does it require expensive equipment like a smartphone? Are there added costs like a data plan?

Social: Does others use of tracking make you feel better or worse? Do you feel guilty when someone posts their runs online?

Because these burdens compete with each other it’s impossible to design to eliminate all of them at once, and so you have to understand which are the most important or provide the biggest barriers for the audience you’re designing for. Julie and her lab published a paper on this if you want to know more “Understanding the emotional burden of health technologies”. She also provided some practical examples of how her team has developed technologies and studies to accommodate these burdens.

ShutEye

One example is the ShutEye sleep tracker that’s designed for people who have some trouble sleeping but are not motivated enough to seek professional help. ShutEye is an Android app that displays on the homescreen with recommendations based on the time of day. For example, it will tell you whether it is too late to have caffeine if you want to get a good night’s sleep.

Another application, BabySteps deals with the emotional component of child development, by displaying development stages as trees in different stages of growth. This removes the stigma of clinical terms like delayed. BabySteps is designed to be used over the first 5 years of a child’s life so the team is also experimenting with different interactions to keep parents engaged for example, a Twitter feed that asks questions about child development. You can find links to all of Julie’s research here.

Julie then summarized with these words of advice:

  • Embed actions in activities people are already doing
  • Provide multiple options for tracking/achieving goals
  • Balance between manual and automated tracking
  • Priortize which burdens you will resolve based on your user’s desire and what your application is intended to accomplish
  • Match the burden to the motivation level of your user

Rebecca took the stage next and tied the two previous talks together with examples from how they built Health 1-2-3 to overcome barriers to engagement in health. While 85% of people say they want to feel better, a number of factors prevent them from reaching that goal. The absence of the following can be barriers to wellness:

Awareness: Not knowing what the actual situation is. (See Marcelo’s Pet Peeve # 5 on Health Risk Assessments.)

Knowledge: Once you have awareness, what can you actually do? Health information is often not delivered in a way that is actionable.

Self-efficacy: People cannot make big changes all at once. How do you make small and incremental changes towards health?

Personalized Solutions: Generic solutions don’t speak to the person or help them take personal responsibility for their health. Personalized solutions are customized based on information about that patient and provide options appropriate for that person’s health.

Time: Solutions need to integrate with people’s lives. Behavior change cannot take so much time as to be prohibitive. What small steps can be integrated?

Support: What types of social support does a person need to make a change? For example, there are many great fitness and health communities, like Strava for cyclists, where people support each other’s goals. On the other hand, social support needs to be in the control of the person. Applications shouldn’t be posting updates on the person’s behalf.

Rebecca walked through all of the above in the context of a Health 123 demo that showed how they simply address the issues. For example, awareness takes the form of a series of simple health questions. Knowledge is tailored health information based on the questions the patients answered. Self-efficacy is addressed by making health challenges reasonable to fit into a person’s day and week.

If you’re interested in or working in health technology in Seattle, I highly recommend these meetups. The content and discussions are packed with inspiration and information, and the burgeoning Seattle Health IT community needs your support.

You can find out about the next meetup here.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, M-health

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