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What’s True Now?

 

Health systems and payers alike are scrambling to figure out what the incoming administration means by repealing Obamacare. The payers admitted to having no contingency plans if Trump won. Trump doesn’t have a clear model, and the Republican party has a number of proposals. Some involve changing the names of programs or offering them in a different way. Some involve scrapping large sections of the affordable care act.

Rather than second-guessing what’s to come, at Wellpepper, we are focusing on what’s true now and what will remain true going forward.

We believe these things will continue to hold true:

  • Innovation will continue. If anything we hope that new innovation in healthcare, and technology innovation in particular is driven by market forces rather than legislation which created winners out of what was not always the best technology.
  • Consumer-focus is good. 20M newly insured individuals and high-deductibles helped create a market for new care organizations like local urgent care and patient-focused primary care. This consumer evolution will continue as patients demand that their healthcare dollars deliver good service.
  • Value and outcome focused approaches will be rewarded. Whether it’s traditional payers or self-insured employers, the light has been shone on areas to improve care AND reduce costs. Healthcare organizations have seen investments in outcomes pay off as well.

It’s time for a new patient experience that is real-time, connected, and based on the individual. We need to take advantage of the ability of technology to scale, analyze, and deliver personal experiences to leapfrog the current technology implementations in healthcare and deliver better outcomes and greater value in healthcare.

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Outcomes

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Better Living Through Big Data

This week I had the opportunity to participate on a lively panel at General Assembly Seattle organized by Seattle Health Innovators, and moderated by Corinne Stroum of Caradigm. Fellow panelists included Randy Wise formerly of Group Health and now at EveryMove, Ang Sun of Regence/Cambia, Lifesprite founder Swatee Surve, and Daniel Newton of Accolade.

Corrine sent us a series of great questions in advance, and we had a rich discussion and so many questions from the audience that we didn’t even get to half of them. It’s a big topic, and with payers, providers, and technologists on the panel there was a lot of opportunity for broad perspectives. There’s a discussion of having a follow-up to this panel to continue the conversation—stay tuned for more on that. The general themes of the discussion included the value of big data to influence individual health with examples like the quantified-self movement, but more generally how our ability to collect and analyze can lead to more personalized and better healthcare. img_3265

At Wellpepper, we have a lot of data to analyze. As Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg pointed out in his Stanford MedX talk and I’ve also talked about in this paper in The Journal of MHealth, having data provides an opportunity to get answers faster than using the traditional scientific method. Rather than formulating a hypothesis, setting up an experiment, collecting data, analyzing the data, and then going back to the drawing board if your hypothesis is not born out, data enables you to ask a series of questions and get immediate and sometimes surprising answers.

The panel kicked off with the sharing of some surprising things that we’ve found from the data,  ranging from which mental health tools were favored by different populations to the ability to predict hospital readmissions. In addition to finding trends from explicit patient input, we also discussed the ability to draw insight from activities including social media and mobile usage patterns. Swatee mentioned the Instagram analysis that showed color scheme on photos was a predictor of depression.

The ability to combine both passive and active patient-generated data, and draw conclusions from broad date sets these data sources can help to deliver better care – resulting in what Daniel Newton referred to as “small data.” That is, I’m going to learn as much as I can about you, and then tailor care to you, which is the approach Accolade takes.

As with any talk on tracking and data, questions of privacy came up. While all the panelists thought that there have become standard terms for people to opt-in to sharing health data, describing the use of that data was deemed important. At this point, Ang Sun from Cambia (who admitted that, as a healthcare plan, they had a heck of a lot of data on people), mused that he wished his physician knew as much about him as Google did. Generally, there was consensus that, if the purpose of the data sharing was for connecting people with the appropriate healthcare services, people would opt in.

Our panel was pretty aligned on the idea that there is big value in big data for healthcare, but that the general applications and usage are still in early days. First, there are the privacy concerns and even laws. Second, current healthcare organizations using this first generation of EMRs have limited ability to look at aggregate data for trends. However, with new technology and personalized approaches to care, we see great promise in big data and predictive analytics for healthcare.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare Research, Research, Seattle

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MHealth and Big Data Are Catalysts for Personalized Patient Care

Although there are many complexities wrapped around our healthcare system, Stanford University’s 2016 Medicine X Conference starts finding solutions to improving patient care by focusing on increasing patient engagement and transforming how patients are treated in the system.

Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg, who spoke at MedX in September with digital health entrepreneur and physician Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, addressed several important aspects of big data collection.

“Collecting big data is like planting trees. You need to plant the seed of the process or tooling,” says Van Snelleberg. “Over time, this matures and produces data.”

Mr. Van Snellenberg, who has collected and analyzed patient data at Wellpepper, discovered several key aspects of data collection that could improve care continuity for both patient and providers. He shared this to his MedX audience.

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“Wellpepper has already uncovered new understandings about which patients are most adherent as well as indicators of readmissions,” says Van Snellenberg. “That’s very valuable information.”

“We’ve discovered that, as you collect patient-generated data, these types of insights as well indications about the effectiveness of certain clinical protocols will be available to you. This will help allow for providers to encourage positive patient behavior,” he stated.

Mr. Van Snellenberg spoke further at an interview in October about collecting and using patient-generated data.

 

Question: What groups can benefit off the collecting of big data?

Snellenberg: Collecting patient-generated data can ultimately produce better outcomes and patient care for hospital and clinics as well as the patients themselves. The more in quantity and detail, the better it is to help produce good results. Data collection has tremendous value that can allow hospitals and clinics to learn more about their patients in between hospital visits, thereby filling in missing gaps in patient information. We also realized that collecting big data can potentially prevent complications or readmissions by identifying warning flags before the patient needs to return to the clinic.

And as mentioned, analyzing big data has provided us insights about which patients are most adherent. For example, we have found that patients with 5-7 tasks are adherent while patients with 8-10 tasks are not.

 

Q: What are some things you have discovered using patient-generated data?

MS: We were able to make observations on the patterns. We also discovered a strong linear correlation between the level of pain and difficulty of patients.

Traditionally, patient data remained in the hospital. This often left big gaps in knowledge about the patient in between hospital visits. By collecting and data in between visits to the hospital, you can discover important correlations that would not have been discoverable without data.

 

Q: What are some possible methods to collect patient data?

MS: Dr. Ravi Komatireddy, who worked in digital health, suggested several programs such as Storyvine and AugMedix.

Usually, data is collected by patients recording symptoms and experiences on a daily basis in a consistent manner and then managed afterwards. For example, patients themselves tend to keep track of their progress in diaries or using the FitBit to record the number of steps and heart rate.

 

Q: What are some of the most unique aspects about this year’s MedX?

MS: One unique aspect about the MedX Conference is that it provided more opportunities for diverse voices to be heard in addition to health professionals – including a mix of health patients, providers, and educators.

The mindset was also encouraged to change. Some of the convention’s most progressive talks on stage happened when phrases such as “How might we…” and “Everybody included” are brought up in the discussion.

The term “Everyone included” came up most often, pushing for more perspectives outside of JUST the physicians. MedX’s solution-oriented focus proves to be heading down a successful route to improving patient care in the healthcare system as well as acting as the initiative to open doors for new voices to be heard.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, patient engagement, Research, Seattle

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