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Myth Busting and Data Gathering At Parks Connected Health

While Verona was abuzz with news of EPIC making patient-records available for research (and possibly without patient consent), a smaller group in San Diego was busy busting myths about seniors, remote monitoring, AI, and patient-generated data at Parks Connected Health Conference.

I had the pleasure of speaking about the positive clinical outcomes we’ve seen using Wellpepper for remote monitoring, in our case providing care plans that enable patients to self-manage, and letting care givers know when people need more help, on a panel with representatives from ResMed, Reflexion Health, AT&T, and Rapid Response Monitoring Systems. While a truly entertaining panel has some disagreement, we were largely in agreement that remote care is here to stay, value-based models support and enable it, and patient-generated data provides valuable insights. While the approach may have been different across companies from connected devices, to avatar coaches for home-based physical therapy, to our patient-focused interactive care plans, we all saw similar successes with a patient or consumer-centric approach.

It was refreshing to hear examples from AARP and United Healthcare recognizing the importance of walking, falls prevention, and gait speed in senior’s health. Our study with Dr. Jonathan Bean showed clinical improvements with gait speed and balance through a digital intervention based on the Live Long Walk Strong program. More programs based on prevention and activity for seniors rather than sensors that detect falls after the fact are needed, and it’s great to see such powerful and prominent organizations advocating for that as well.

Parks and Associates is a research-led analyst firm, so each panel started with results of market research they’d completed, and also real-time audience polls of key issues or drivers in connected health. The audience and most speakers were bullish on technology as an enabler and amplifier for humans, whether that’s enabling clinicians to see more patients, enabling caregivers to stay in touch with their charges, or enabling consumers or patients themselves to self-manage. Technology, and in particular machine-learning and AI were not seen as the be-all and end-all, but as ingredients to a successful human-led strategy. (With the exception of a keynote by CirrusMD who advocated for people-backed triage and staying away from chatbots and AI.)

With CMS announcing goals for 50% of reimbursement to be value-based, reimbursement was less of a topic at this conference than in previous years. However, the complexity and fragmentation of healthcare is still a challenge, whether that’s in care settings, the payer/provider divide, or consumer versus medical grade monitoring devices. Usability is key, with many speakers talking about the difficulty of setting up and managing devices, even the best designed consumer devices. And while the focus was on seniors, it seems that everyone has struggled with packaging, networking, and connectivity.

In addition to the “AI will replace humans” myth, my other favorite myth to be busted at this conference was the idea that sensors and sensor data alone will solve all the problems. During one panel an audience member referred to sensor data as superior to patient observations. (Actually referring to it as “the worst” type of data.) Thankfully both MDs on the panel he was addressing said “the best thing you can do is listen to what your patient is telling you.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Connected Health, Wellpepper results

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, machine learning, patient engagement, patient-generated data, Physical Therapy

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