Blog

Healthcare Transformation: Emulating Disney Is Not A Bad Idea

Last week, I had the privilege of speaking to a group of CMIOs about disruption and consumerism in healthcare. We had a lively discussion, with the two main takeaways being that having a broad digital strategy is key, and also that healthcare really needs to find its own way to delivering the things consumers want. While looking to other industries for inspiration is a good way to think about change, blindly implementing strategies without thinking about how to adapt them for your own industry is not a good path.

We started off the discussion with this quiz from Elizabeth Rosenthal, former physician and health editor of the New York Times, and author of An American Sickness. Try it for yourself: it’s fun to try to figure out which is the hospital and which is the luxury hotel. (The CMIOs got 8/12 correct. Can you beat them?)

This prompted a debate about how much environment matters to healing, and why hospitals have no “back office.” Having a calming environment can definitely promote healing, however, it wasn’t clear from some of the images presented in the quiz whether healing or luxury was the goal.

Adopting ideas from other industries without fully understanding their priorities and understand how they might differ from your goals. For example, people may complain about the Disneyfication of healthcare, and point to managing to the HCHAPS survey as driving this and other evils. However, did you know that Disney’s #1 corporate value is safety? Adopting safety as a number one organizational value in healthcare would be completely relevant and appropriate. What has happened with these hotel-like experiences is adopting the surface of what Disney stands for without understanding the core goals and objectives of the experience or of the patient, or even of what Disney is trying to achieve.

Recently I received this in the mail from UnitedHealthcare.

Much has been written about the power of hand-written notes, however, usually within business situations and often from a senior manager to a junior manager. This, however, is not a good use of a handwritten note. It’s so many kinds of wrong, and bordering on creepy, especially since I had just gone for my annual physical.

The pressure to deliver better service, and better outcomes is not going to decrease in healthcare. However, it’s easy to avoid these types of pitfalls by considering what people are really looking for. This might not be the same for all patients, but we think this sets up a good framework to approach consumerization.

In addition to thinking about how your offerings, outreach, and engagement with patients fulfills these needs, going a step further, you could try to think about which one of these is most important to each individual patient, and that’s really the crux of delivering a great patient or consumer experience.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Meaningful Use, Outcomes, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

Leave a Comment (0) ↓

Leave a Comment

Google+