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Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

Speaker(s):

Edward Dobrzykowski, PT, DPT, ATC, MHS

Janice Kuperstein, PhD

Karen Ogle, PT, DPT

Charles Workman, PT, MPT, MBA

CSM StepsThe consensus from the speakers in this session was that the changes are real, they require work on the part of healthcare providers, and that physical therapists have a great opportunity to participate. There was definitely a greater sense of urgency on this topic than in previous years at CSM, and speakers made sure the audience knew that:

“While we’re all worried about G-codes, new players like Walmart, Walgreen’s, and Google are creating entirely new models of care.”

“Patient satisfaction is not enough, we need to look at outcomes”

“Reducing length of stay is not going to be the only way to reduce costs.”

Some of the major themes of the Affordable Care Act that speakers believed impact physical therapy include:

  • Realignment of care models from management of chronic disease to preventative medicine
  • Conservative interventions preferred over surgery due to costs and outcomes
  • New payment models and reduction in visits
  • Direct access to physical therapy
  • Standardization of service
  • Accountability for services delivered
  • Outcomes measurement

All of these were seen to provide both challenges and opportunities to the profession. Similar to other sessions, opportunities in improving outcomes and decreasing costs of post acute care, and in improving discharge, and care transitions to reduce readmissions were seen as key areas where physical therapy could have a big impact, however, physical therapists needed to participate more in the process.

Presenters pointed out that homecare workers and occupational therapists are already working in health coaching positions for population health management, but physical therapists were not really serving in these roles. Given that many studies show that discharge to home is best for the patient, and also lowers costs, this is seen as a missed opportunity for physical therapists.

Full moon over Indianapolis

Full moon over Indianapolis

In order to effect change, moving to more accountability and measurement is important, for example predictor tools to score patient on risk of readmit and standardized outcome tools. By moving to these measures and recording outcomes, physical therapists will be better able to participate as part of new payment models, like bundled payments.

Considering that for the patient, function is usually the most important outcome, and physical therapists are experts in delivering a return to function, the core value equation could be applied directly to physical therapy to deliver better outcomes at lower costs.

Value = Quality x Patient satisfaction

Attendees were encouraged to ask questions during the session and feedback ranged from a hospital-based physical therapist participating in a bundled total joint replacement scenario, where the hospital was receiving 3% back from CMS due to delivering positive outcomes at a lower cost than stipulated to those in smaller or private practice wondering whether there was room for them to participate in these types of payments with hospitals, or whether they would be shut-out. This was a common theme at the conference as private practice owners questioned whether controlling costs and outcomes would mean that hospitals would bring outpatient physical therapy in-house.

Similar to other sessions, suggested that the two keys to delivering on new value-based payment models required better care collaboration among multi-disciplinary teams and standardized outcome reporting.

“Merely aligning financial incentives between providers of acute and post-acute care will not improve quality and reduce costs for episodes of care. True coordination of care is required to ensure the best possible outcomes.” Ackerly DC and Grabowski DC. Post-Acute Reform- Beyond The ACA. NEJM 2014;370(8):689-691

For outcome reporting, the question was asked if patient-reported outcomes were the new gold standard. If patient satisfaction and functional outcomes are key in the value equation, then they are.

To conclude presenters reminded participants what they can do to participate in this new world, which reflects the larger clinical, demographic, and social trends.

  • Develop strategies and tactics around population health management
  • Optimize efficiency in each practice segment
  • Build collaboration “upstream” and “downstream”
  • Position for more integration

The session did a great job of showing that the change is real, the opportunities are there, but also making attendees understand that the time is now. Our overall impression of the conference this year is that physical therapists have a great opportunity to be on the front-lines of some of this change but that they may need to move faster than in the past. Exciting times to be in patient-centered care!

Posted in: Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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