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Functional Screening as a lead generation tool

UBC BodyWorks Centre

UBC BodyWorks Centre

This past week the Bodyworks Fitness Center at the University of British Columbia School of Kinesology had an open house. They offered free functional movement screenings (FMS) and Titlest Performance Institute (TPI) screenings for golfers.

A few of us signed up for the 20 minute screens and walked away with a scoring sheet of results. The TPI was probably more useful as it specicially targeted golf and was pretty clear where the individual would need to improve to positively affect golf swing. The FMS was interesting in that it highlighted core stability issues that a person might not be aware of, however, the session could have been improved if the screener had engaged us in a few questions about our sports and exercise goals. Otherwise, it was hard to make the leap from the screening results to potential areas for improvement. It was nice to find out that an old shoulder issue has healed and is back to a full range of motion.

Titlest Functional Movement Screen

Titlest Functional Movement Screen

The real value to the center in providing these free screenings in getting the person to sign up for a program based on improving their weak areas. The open house also featured free access to the fitness center, talks on wellness, and tours. All of these activities were designed to raise awareness and hopefully gain new clients, especially before they become injured.

Our curiosity and love of the word “free” got us in the door, which is definitely a good first step. Did we join? No, and that’s because the location isn’t convenient, which is something for single clinic practitioners to consider. Unless you’re the local expert in a particular type of treatment or injury, your market is largely your local community.

Titlest Functional Movement Screen

Titlest Functional Movement Screen

We weren’t really the target market:  the Kinesiology student who showed us around mentioned that the target was mostly professors, students, and seniors who lived in the area. Apparently people won’t walk more than a block to a coffee shop, which is why in Seattle and Vancouver there’s one on every corner. We wonder if anyone’s figured out how far they would walk or drive to a clinic or a fitness center.

 

 

 

Posted in: Rehabilitation Business

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