Return on Investment

Archive for Return on Investment

Study Results: The Rehabilitation Enhancing Aging Through Connected Health Prehabilitation Trial

In 2015, we announced a study with principal investigator Jonathan Bean, MD from Harvard Medical school to test his custom protocol for at-risk seniors using Wellpepper’s interactive care plan solution to deliver the intervention to patients, and for clinicians to monitor those patients. The intervention was based on a successful intervention that Dr. Bean delivered at Spaulding Rehab in Boston called “Live Long Walk Strong.” This intervention was aimed at improving strength and mobility in seniors to help prevent adverse events.  The project with Wellpepper, eventually called the REACH study, was to determine whether this type of intervention could be delivered remotely through a mobile interface, which would enable scaling the program to patients who weren’t able to attend in-person sessions (40% of the participants in the original Live Long Walk Strong Program deferred care due to travel requirements), and also decrease costs both for patients and providers. The REACH study used the following process. REACH study process

We’re pleased to report that the results of the study have now been published, with positive outcomes reported. This was designed as a quasi-experimental trial, where 75 participants were compared to a control group made up of a comparable sample of 100 people from the general population. Outcomes between groups were then compared, with clinically meaningful and statistically significant differences (as defined by P-values) observed in the study group.

Care Plan Intervention

Patients received a strength and conditioning program delivered first through in-person classes, and a mobile application, and then through the mobile application with remote messaging with a healthcare provider. During the last 4 months of the study, patients were left on their own and not monitored by a clinician. The study was designed to address not just physical health but incorporate aspects of motivational behavior change.

Motivational behavior change through an m-health intervention

Outcomes

  • Compared to the control group, participants in the program had a 73% decrease in emergency department visits during a 1-year period
  • Clinically meaningful improvements in mobility as recorded in the 6-minute walk test (+.8 meters/second) and Short Physical Performance Battery test (+.69 units)
  • 85% of patients were active at least twice per week
  • 89% rated application satisfaction at “good to excellent” and would recommend to a friend
  • 16-20 percentage point drop off in adherence during the last 4 unmonitored months

The REACH intervention shows positive outcomes in targeting functional decline and the avoidance of adverse event for older primary care adults. The potential benefits should be evaluated and confirmed on a larger scale. If your health system is managing a population that would benefit from an intervention like this, please be in touch.

More Information

If you are interested in deploying a solution in your organization based on the protocol used in this study, contact us.

Study Announcement Press Release

Study Methodology and Description

Published Study

Posted in: Healthcare Research, Outcomes, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Research, Return on Investment

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Calculating Return On Investment For Interactive Care Plans

Patient engagement and education is perhaps one of the most under-utilized resources in the care continuum. Patients who are engaged in their care cost healthcare systems [cost] 8% less than non-engaged patients in their base year, and 21% less in future years.[1]

Interactive treatment plans deliver return on investment in three key ways:

Improving patient satisfaction and outcomes

  • Patients look for quality and convenience when they choose a provider organization. They want to be able to interact with their healthcare organization on the same terms as everything else in their lives. Improving outcomes also increases patient satisfaction.

Increasing access to care

  • By monitoring what patients are doing outside the clinic and enabling patients to self-manage, you can increase access to care by seeing the right patients, seeing more patients, and improving recall. Making sure patients are prepared for surgery decreases no-shows and increases utilization and access to care.

Reducing costs

  • Cost reductions are the most dependent on model of care since a readmission or ED visit could be a source of revenue. However, you can look for reducing hard costs of seminars and handouts as well as costs of readmissions, extra visits in capitated models, and of complications. For patients poor outcomes increase costs both out of pocket and in quality of life. Manual labor costs of administering surveys and follow up questionaries can also be avoided with automated systems.

Long-term impact

Patient engagement can have a much stronger long-term impact, including reducing:

  • Hidden costs of variability in care delivery
  • Hidden costs of lack of standardization and manual processes
  • Costs of poor patient outcomes that result in worsening patient problems

As well, as an industry have only begun to scratch the surface of the types of clinical and behavioral insights that will be derived from patient-reported data, that will enable more efficient and effective treatment based on predictive models, and stronger patient participation in their own care.

For our full whitepaper, and ROI economic models contact sales@wellpepper.com or call (844) 899-7377 and press 1 for Sales.

[1] Health Affairs, 32, no.2 (2013):207-214 What The Evidence Shows About Patient Activation: Better Health Outcomes And Care Experiences; Fewer Data On Costs

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare transformation, patient-generated data, Return on Investment

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