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LAM Conference – A patient’s perspective

Dr. George Pappas, LAM Regional Clinic Director

Last weekend, my husband and I attended the Regional TSC and LAM Conference at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, WA. This conference covered current research developments, treatment options, and patient education. I attended because I wanted my husband to learn more about Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), because I am a patient. The LAM Foundation defines LAM as “a rare lung disease that usually strikes women during the prime of their lives… this disease is characterized by an abnormal growth of smooth muscle cells, especially in the lungs, lymphatic system, and kidneys.” LAM occurs almost exclusively in women, and it is usually misdiagnosed for years, often as asthma, emphysema, and/or bronchitis. LAM is considered a progressive disease, which can lead to lung transplantation 10 years post diagnosis or for some, like me, it progresses slower. Treatment with a mTOR inhibitor, Rapamune, may improve lung function, which was all the buzz at this conference, but unfortunately there is no cure.

This conference was coordinated by the patient advocacy networks, The LAM Foundation and TS Alliance, and was designed to provide patients with the opportunity to interact with the LAM scientific community, physicians, and patients. I have to be honest, I was surprised to see a packed room because there are only 3-5 LAM patients per million women in the world. I later learned that newly diagnosed patients traveled from as far as Alaska with their loved ones for the same reasons as I: to learn more about clinical drug trials, to ask questions, and meet other ‘Lammies’. This mutual interest was palpable during the presentation by Dr. Ray Yeung, a surgeon and renowned LAM expert. Hands were flying up with questions. Dr. Yeung spoke about the pros and cons of clinical trials, and the pathogenesis of Angiomyolipomas (AML) and LAM. Dr. Yueng had a great amount of positive energy for what he has learned about LAM through his research and it was awesome to hear from a scientist about the importance of patients getting involved in clinical trials.

After the session with Dr. Yeung, we had lunch and I got to talk to a very lovely woman that worked as a Patient Relations Advocate for Lundbeck, a pharmaceutical company that sponsored the conference. Her role was to bring the face of the company to the patient advocacy foundations and their patients, and in return be the voice of patients in order to always keep us in the forefront of the company’s mission. I was particularly impressed with this, especially coming from the pharmaceutical industry, which tends to get a bad rap as being money centric. I continue to be awestruck with her grace, attitude, and lovely disposition, and how she didn’t once talk about her company, but wanted to know more about ME, not my disease. I really hope that our talk (and the fact that I thanked her repetitively) and the other conversations she had with patients that gathered around us, made her journey worth it.

On the drive home, she really got me thinking about how important her role is, and how the information she gathered will be priceless to both Lundbeck and to the LAM community; what she learned cannot be found in any search engine or book. I believe there is a huge disconnect between patients and some of the key players in making us… well, not patients anymore. The folks that advocate for us are so important because not only do they form an overarching understanding of disease, research treatments, help us keep symptoms under control, argue with the insurance companies, help us manage setbacks, etc., they also help us realize there is meaning to getting up in the morning and living life knowing we are not alone. It’s like having a big mama bear always looking out for you, so you can focus on you and not your disease.

Upcoming events…
The International Rare Diseases Research Conference & LAMposium, Cincinnati, OH, Sept 22-25, 2016
LAM Regional Conference, Cleveland Clinic, November 5, 2016.

Posted in: chronic disease, Clinical Research, Managing Chronic Disease, Patient Advocacy, patient engagement, Rare disease, Research, Seattle

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