Physical Therapy

Archive for Physical Therapy

Falls Challenge

How might we enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls? We have entered a challenge with AARP and IDEO to bring our proven falls solutions to the masses. Along side our partners at Harvard and Boston University, we believe that using mobile technology to enhance and scale a proven falls prevention program will lead to better life by increasing access to care and decreasing costs.

The challenge started with over 220 submissions and recently weeded down to the top 40. We’re thrilled to have made the first cut. Our method is proven and we invite you to participate in the next round to refine our idea and help achieve greater impact.

Click here to check out our entry!

 

 

Posted in: Aging, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Research, Uncategorized

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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Taking the Fear Out of Total Joint Replacement

I’m not quite ready for a joint replacement but many of our Wellpepper users are, so I found myself spending a recent Saturday morning at a session called “Taking The Fear Out of Total Joint Replacement.” This patient-focused half-day workshop was free to potential patients and sponsored by an organization called SwiftPath that specializes in minimally invasive outpatient total joint procedures. Total joint procedures are feeling the crunch of reimbursement changes in the Affordable Care Act, and one way to lower costs is to perform them in an outpatient facility. However, due to the minimized time an outpatient candidate would spend under the supervision of a doctor, they must be highly engaged in their self-care efforts, including losing weight or quitting smoking if necessary. With people having replacements at younger ages, and often having both knees and hips replaced, the need for engaged patients continues to grow.

I attended the workshop to get an idea of the patient’s perspective on the information and on the procedure. Health systems frequently offer Total Joint Bootcamp but this was intended as an introductory session for people who may be undecided about getting a replacement. The sessions included information about good candidates for minimally invasive total joint replacement, expectations of patients and their caregivers for participation, learning, and recovery, and an overview of the physical therapy involved. The host for the day was Dr. Craig McAllister who is one of the principals of the SwiftPath method. With the exception of the initial opening sequence of surgeons talking about the effictiveness of the methodology, the day was primarily patient focused, starting with risk stratification as a means to determining the best candidates for surgery, through tracking patient reported outcomes, and ensuring patients and caregivers were equal participants in care. There was also a session on determining how a patient pays. Dr. McAllister noted at one point that this entire patient-centered approach was completely different than what he was taught in medical school.

Two of the most powerful sessions were also patient-focused. The first was a patient panel consisting of an OR nurse who had a recent knee replacement and biked to the session, a few people who had experienced both in-patient and outpatient replacements, and one who was not originally a candidate for surgery because he was a smoker. While quitting is a requirement for the surgery, he initially didn’t want to until he realized that he would lose his opportunity to have Dr. McAllister perform the surgery, concluding that he needed the surgeon more than the surgeon needed him: “If I didn’t do what he said, the next patient in line would.” I thought this was a really interesting approach to motivating change: be inspiring and selective, not punitive or even threatening. All of the participants talked about having low pain levels, and some not using the prescribed opiates. As part of the program, Dr. McAllister closely tracked their post-surgical pain, nausea, and opiate usage. One patient disclosed that he drove himself to his first post-surgery physical therapy appointment, and although this was not encouraged, his PT actually gave him the all-clear to drive home.

The final session of the day was possibly the most striking. It featured a police officer and the founder of a drug addiction non-profit, Amber’s Hope talking about opiate addiction. This session was sobering, both from the impact of the drugs but also because measures to control these dangerous substances have actually exacerbated the problem. Since opiates cannot be prescribed by phone, and post-surgery patients are not mobile enough to visit a physician, get a prescription, and take it to a pharmacy, physicians need to prescribe what they believe will be enough pills prior to surgery, which can lead to leftover pills. Most non-prescribed usage of opiates comes from these leftover pills, which means that educating patients on how to dispose of them is key. In Kirkland, Washington where this session took place, for example, the only way to dispose of them is to take them to the local police station. (FDA recommendations for disposal of prescription drugs can be found here.) At Wellpepper, we track the use of both over-the-counter and prescribed painkillers as part of treatment plans. We do this for two reasons: first, it’s a valuable piece of information about a patient’s pain levels and recovery time, and second, too often these pills are prescribed as needed and usage isn’t monitored, leading to a nationwide opiate problem.

I attended this event so I could better understand the people who will eventually use our software. I learned a lot more about changes in care delivery, and got some great ideas for continuing to engage patients that you’ll see in future updates to our products.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Opioids, Outcomes, Patient Advocacy, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy, Seattle

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Our Picks for APTA CSM 2016

APTA CSM 2016Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg will be at APTA CSM in Anaheim this year, and here are a few of the sessions you might see him at. If you want to be sure to see him, book a meeting.

As usual we’re following sessions about healthcare transformation, patient experience and patient centered care, patient reported outcomes, and interventions that include technology. With the conservative care and physical therapy being an important part of new bundles like CMS’s Comprehensive Care for Total Joint Replacement, these are hot topics as well.

Here are a few session picks from Wellpepper.

Patient-Centered Care

Exercise and Diabetes: Tools for Integrating Patient-Directed Practice

The Customer Experience in Health Care: The Game Changer, Part 1

Words Mean Things: How Language Impacts Clinical Results

Acute Care Productivity Measurement, “What about the Patient?” The Time has Come to Shift to a Value Based Measurement System

Technology

Wearable Technology Meets Physical Therapy

Virtual Reality and Serious Game-Based Rehabilitation for Injured Service Members

Tracking Outcomes

Changing Behavior Through Physical Therapy: Improving Patient Outcomes

Functional Reconciliation: Implementing Outcomes Across the Continuum

Using Outcomes Data to Improve Provider, Patient and Payer Engagement and Demonstrate the Value of Your Services

Healthcare Transformation and New Models of Care

Exceptional Care and Profitability in Light of Health Care Reform for Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

The Complicated Hip: A New Debate

Emerging Issues in Medicare and Health Care Reform, Part 2

Bundled Payment Implementation for Primary Total Joint Patients

Managing Patient-Centered Care in a Changing Reimbursement World

Health System PT’s Leading the Transition to Value-Based Health Care

Posted in: Adherence, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Rehabilitation Business

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EvergreenHealth Selects Wellpepper as Mobile Patient Engagement Solution for Total Joint Replacement

SEATTLEJan. 20, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Wellpepper, Inc., a clinically validated platform for patient engagement, today announced that EvergreenHealth, an integrated health care system that serves nearly 850,000 residents in northern King and southern Snohomishcounties in Washington State, has selected Wellpepper as the mobile engagement solution for all total joint replacement and musculoskeletal care plans. The project was made possible at EvergreenHealth with a generous donation from The Schultz Family Foundation, a private not-for-profit foundation founded by Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks Corporation, and his wife Sheri.

Patients with musculoskeletal issues that require surgery or rehabilitation will use Wellpepper on their mobile devices to track their outcomes and adhere to their care plans. This information will enable patients, physicians, and other healthcare providers to track progress and patient-reported outcomes in real-time to improve care. Wellpepper enables health systems to implement their own care instructions on its task-based platform and makes it easy for patients to understand and adhere to their care instructions.

“Across our organization, we strive to be a trusted source for innovative care solutions for our patients and families, and our partnership with Wellpepper helps us deliver on that commitment,” said EvergreenHealth CEO Bob Malte. “Since we began using Wellpepper in 2014, we’ve seen how the solution enhances the interaction between patients and providers and ultimately leads to optimal recovery and the best possible outcomes for our patients.”

The Wellpepper remote care management solution is designed to be easy-to-use and highly engaging for patients while being flexible and easily customizable for use in clinical practice. It is clinically-proven to improve patient adherence and outcomes with over 70 percent patient engagement.

Health systems are increasingly looking for solutions to enhance patient care while reducing costs, and this is particularly true in total joint and musculoskeletal scenarios. The new Comprehensive Care Model for Total Joint replacement announced by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid aims to reduce the cost and quality variability of procedures.

“We are seeing a lot of interest in using the Wellpepper platform in orthopedic and total joint replacement scenarios,” said Anne Weiler, co-founder and CEO of Wellpepper. “Interest and adoption are largely being driven by our ability to customize the care plans based on the health system’s own protocols, personalize the plans for each patient and collect the standardized outcomes required as part of the new Center for Medicare and Medicaid requirements.”

The Wellpepper platform doesn’t dictate care plans; instead it provides a set of task-based building blocks that health systems and providers can customize to reflect their own methodologies and practices. The patient interface is simple and straightforward, so patients get only the tasks and questions they need on a given day.

For more information about Wellpepper or to find out how the Wellpepper patient engagement solution can support value-based payment models, please visit wellpepper.wpengine.com or email info@wellpepper.com.

About EvergreenHealth
EvergreenHealth is an integrated health care system that serves nearly 850,000 residents in King and Snohomish counties and offers a breadth of services and programs that is among the most comprehensive in the region. More than 950 physicians provide clinical excellence in over 80 specialties, including heart and vascular care, oncology, surgical care, orthopedics, neurosciences, women’s and children’s services, pulmonary care and home care and hospice services. Formed as a public hospital district in 1972, EvergreenHealth includes a 318-bed acute care medical center in Kirkland, a network of 10 primary care practices, two urgent care centers, over two dozen specialty care practices and 24/7 emergency care at its Kirkland campus, Monroe campus and at a freestanding center in Redmond. In 2015, the system expanded to include EvergreenHealth Monroe – an accredited, full-service 72-bed public hospital district, established in 1960 in Monroe, Washington. EvergreenHealth has clinical and strategic partnerships with several health care entities, including Virginia Mason, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and dozens of independent practices that are part of the clinically integrated EvergreenHealth Partners network. In addition to clinical care, EvergreenHealth offers extensive community health outreach and education programs, anchored by the 24/7 EvergreenHealth Nurse Navigator & Healthline. For more information, visit www.evergreenhealth.com.

About The Schultz Family Foundation
The Schultz Family Foundation, established in 1996 by Howard and Sheri Schultz, creates pathways of opportunity for populations facing barriers to success. The Foundation invests in innovative solutions and partnerships that unlock people’s potential, and strengthen our businesses, our communities, and our nation. For more information about the Foundation and its work: schultzfamilyfoundation.org.

About Wellpepper
Wellpepper is a healthcare technology company that provides a clinically validated platform for digital treatment plans delivered via mobile devices. The Wellpepper patient engagement solution improves patient adherence and outcomes with its patent-pending adaptive notification system and just-in-time, task-based instructions and by fostering communication between healthcare providers and patients. Wellpepper is used by major health systems that are moving to an accountable care organization model and need to track and improve patient outcomes while lowering costs. Wellpepper was founded in 2012 to help healthcare organizations lower costs, improve outcomes and improve patient satisfaction. The company is headquartered in Seattle, Washington.

Media Contact:
Jennifer Allen Newton
Bluehouse Consulting Group, Inc.
503-805-7540
jennifer (at) bluehousecg (dot) com

SOURCE Wellpepper

RELATED LINKS
http://wellpepper.wpengine.com


Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Interoperability, M-health, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Press Release, Rehabilitation Business

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This Month [August] in Telemedicine

This Month [August] in Telemedicine

Moderated by:
Jonathan Linkous
Chief Executive Officer,
American Telemedicine Association

Gary Capistrant
Chief Policy Officer,
American Telemedicine Association

This month in Telemedicine webcast was interesting because more than once was the ATA sentiment geared towards realizing the big picture of telemedicine: To help patients. Unless you are lucky enough to work directly with patients that utilized telemedicine on a daily basis, I think sometimes, including myself, we get caught up in the bureaucracy/methodological side of things. Sometimes it takes talking with patient or clinician in order to make me grasp how HIT is improving lives, my life too! So I appreciate the reminder John! At the end of the webcast he asked if you have a personal story of how telemedicine helped you or a loved one ATA needs to hear it, please email John Linkous -jlinkous@americantelemed.org

The main highlight of the first 20 minutes of this webcast focused on the positive trend of telemedicine utilization. Not surprising the younger crowd just beginning their careers in medicine strongly support the use of telemedicine; Medscape conducted a survey and found out that 70% residents had no problem consulting via telemedicine. And maybe because I am of the ‘younger’ crowd (bahaha) I think this is ingenious: the Colorado medicine board is doing away with the rule that patients need to see doctors face to face before utilizing telemedicine; ok so how many times have you gone all the way to the doctor’s office only to get a referral or need blood work done before they can give you a diagnosis/treatment?! Genius! Other interesting facts: 20% of American adults use some technology to track health care (counting steps, migraine triggers & heart rate, etc.) and 57% of households with children access one health portal per a month. Finally big employers are seeing the benefit of telemedicine to cut back on insurance costs; 75% of large employers will be using telehealth as a benefit next year.

Licensure compacts. Ok guys really? Every “This month in telemedicine” webcast talks about this. What is the hold up?! It is so frustrating to me that if I get ill on vacation in Hawaii (ok dreaming, who gets sick in Hawaii?) I cannot get a consult from my doctor over the phone or the internet. This is silly people and it was clear to me that John thinks so as well. He underscored the importance that ATA supports the federation’s compacts in principal, but has some concerns… it is estimated that it will cost 300 million for the 21% of physicians that have more than one state license. Oh money, yea ok that’s the same old hold up every time. Next time they talk about state licensure compacts I am just going to put a dollar sign in my post… you’ll understand.

Circa 1934. Broadcast to Webcast; Radio Technology to Wireless Telegraphy… and now just ‘wireless’. http://www.cio.noaa.gov/rfm/index.html

Frustration was also heard in John’s voice about the FCC Telecommunications Act of 1996. The last Telecommunications act was in 1934, 62 years it took to write a revision, and it looks like it will take another 62 years at the rate they are going! ATA continues to be disappointed in the Act; the FCC estimated there would be a 400 million a year in spending on broadband linking rural healthcare, last year they approved for 200 million. They have only deployed 100 million; only spending a quarter on what the program was supposed to spend- “they need to step up.” Why John? They have 62 years to spend that!

A big note: telemedicine care for post discharge (knee and hip replacements) isn’t expanded out to Physical and Occupational Therapy for Medicare patients. CMS has waived two of Medicare restrictions: allow any Medicare beneficiary to provide services regardless of where they reside but somehow does not include health innovation- “we will be commenting to CMS” and so they did in a letter dated 9/8 strongly urging CMS “…to allow for PT and OT to provide rehabilitation by telehealth means, otherwise covered by Medicare…”

The ATA Fall Forum is next week (9/16-18) in Washington D.C. (and yes I put in D.C. being from Washington state!) with the highest registration rate ever and the exhibits have sold out. They actually have a ATA meeting mobile app for those of us that cannot make it. With a conference that has “Tele” in the name, I see this as the most logical and sensible way to attend.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business, Telemedicine

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Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Healthcare Reform and the Affordable Care Act: One Year Later

Speaker(s):

Edward Dobrzykowski, PT, DPT, ATC, MHS

Janice Kuperstein, PhD

Karen Ogle, PT, DPT

Charles Workman, PT, MPT, MBA

CSM StepsThe consensus from the speakers in this session was that the changes are real, they require work on the part of healthcare providers, and that physical therapists have a great opportunity to participate. There was definitely a greater sense of urgency on this topic than in previous years at CSM, and speakers made sure the audience knew that:

“While we’re all worried about G-codes, new players like Walmart, Walgreen’s, and Google are creating entirely new models of care.”

“Patient satisfaction is not enough, we need to look at outcomes”

“Reducing length of stay is not going to be the only way to reduce costs.”

Some of the major themes of the Affordable Care Act that speakers believed impact physical therapy include:

  • Realignment of care models from management of chronic disease to preventative medicine
  • Conservative interventions preferred over surgery due to costs and outcomes
  • New payment models and reduction in visits
  • Direct access to physical therapy
  • Standardization of service
  • Accountability for services delivered
  • Outcomes measurement

All of these were seen to provide both challenges and opportunities to the profession. Similar to other sessions, opportunities in improving outcomes and decreasing costs of post acute care, and in improving discharge, and care transitions to reduce readmissions were seen as key areas where physical therapy could have a big impact, however, physical therapists needed to participate more in the process.

Presenters pointed out that homecare workers and occupational therapists are already working in health coaching positions for population health management, but physical therapists were not really serving in these roles. Given that many studies show that discharge to home is best for the patient, and also lowers costs, this is seen as a missed opportunity for physical therapists.

Full moon over Indianapolis

Full moon over Indianapolis

In order to effect change, moving to more accountability and measurement is important, for example predictor tools to score patient on risk of readmit and standardized outcome tools. By moving to these measures and recording outcomes, physical therapists will be better able to participate as part of new payment models, like bundled payments.

Considering that for the patient, function is usually the most important outcome, and physical therapists are experts in delivering a return to function, the core value equation could be applied directly to physical therapy to deliver better outcomes at lower costs.

Value = Quality x Patient satisfaction

Attendees were encouraged to ask questions during the session and feedback ranged from a hospital-based physical therapist participating in a bundled total joint replacement scenario, where the hospital was receiving 3% back from CMS due to delivering positive outcomes at a lower cost than stipulated to those in smaller or private practice wondering whether there was room for them to participate in these types of payments with hospitals, or whether they would be shut-out. This was a common theme at the conference as private practice owners questioned whether controlling costs and outcomes would mean that hospitals would bring outpatient physical therapy in-house.

Similar to other sessions, suggested that the two keys to delivering on new value-based payment models required better care collaboration among multi-disciplinary teams and standardized outcome reporting.

“Merely aligning financial incentives between providers of acute and post-acute care will not improve quality and reduce costs for episodes of care. True coordination of care is required to ensure the best possible outcomes.” Ackerly DC and Grabowski DC. Post-Acute Reform- Beyond The ACA. NEJM 2014;370(8):689-691

For outcome reporting, the question was asked if patient-reported outcomes were the new gold standard. If patient satisfaction and functional outcomes are key in the value equation, then they are.

To conclude presenters reminded participants what they can do to participate in this new world, which reflects the larger clinical, demographic, and social trends.

  • Develop strategies and tactics around population health management
  • Optimize efficiency in each practice segment
  • Build collaboration “upstream” and “downstream”
  • Position for more integration

The session did a great job of showing that the change is real, the opportunities are there, but also making attendees understand that the time is now. Our overall impression of the conference this year is that physical therapists have a great opportunity to be on the front-lines of some of this change but that they may need to move faster than in the past. Exciting times to be in patient-centered care!

Posted in: Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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The Power of Data: Achieving Consistent Health Outcomes

Recap from APTA CSM 2015: The Power of Data: Achieving Consistent Health Outcomes

Speakers:

Dianne Jewell, DPT, PhD

Heather Smith, PT, MPH

Mary Stilphen, DPT

Outcomes were a hot topic at APTA CSM 2015, and not surprisingly as CMS just announced that by 2018 50% of Medicaid payments would be through new value-based payment outcomes with value defined as the relationship between outcomes and costs.

This session presented a basic primer on outcomes, how to evaluate them, and the differences between functional and patient-reported outcomes before jumping into the meat of the topic, presented as a case study of some interesting new work done at The Cleveland Clinic to drive better decision making in post-acute care.

Embarking on a new model is not for the faint of heart and the case study outlined in this session is still under-development and refinement even though the journey was started in 2010 with a definition of which outcomes they wanted to collect.

To explain this, presenters quoted Eleanor Roosevelt:

“Each time you learn something new you have to adjust the whole framework of your knowledge”

For The Cleveland Clinic, Step 1 back in 2010 was to implement an EMR so that consistent data could be tracked for every patient visit, and then start to use this data to effect care, with the main goal to make better decisions about appropriate discharge from acute care.

In order to collect data consistently however, they had to define a tool, and wanted to ensure that it was not cumbersome. They modified Boston University’s 24 question “Activity Measure for Post Acute Care” or “AMPAC” to a shorter survey they named“6 Clicks” to represent the number of mouse clicks to complete the survey. While acronyms are often all the rage in research studies, a catchy and evocative name is better if you want someone to actually use something, and “6 Clicks” definitely fit the bill.

The goal of completing the “6 Clicks” survey was to measure longitudinally across patient care and eventually be able to predict the best discharge setting based on this information. The ultimate goal was to improve outcomes without increasing costs and the flip-side decrease costs without impacting outcomes.

The 6-Clicks consists of 12 questions, 6 each for PT and OT accessment. For PT the questions are related to Mobility and for OT to Self-Care. The ultimate use of the data is to ensure the best care for the patient and the optimal use of resources within the hospital.

The 6-Clicks tool raised the visibility of the physical therapists within the hospital as they were able to make the best recommendations for patient discharge setting based on analyzing the data, and the data-driven approach gave all staff a way to talk about these decisions. Prior to using the tool, it wasn’t clear whether in-patient physical therapists were spending time with the right patients or whether the patient would thrive in the discharge setting.

6-Clicks Results. Source: The Cleveland Clinic

6-Clicks Results. Source: The Cleveland Clinic

Based on the patient’s 6-Clicks score they could determine whether to discharge to home with no services, with services, to skilled nursing facility, or to long-term care facility. 6-Clicks could also be used to determine the appropriate in-hospital care based on eventual discharge. For example, if a patient was predicted to be best discharged to home with no services, the in-patient physical therapists would focus on mobility and self-care to make sure the patient was self-sufficient on discharge.

As The Cleveland Clinic continues on this outcome journey, which has been rolled out across all of their hospital locations, the next step is to provide outcome analysis for the continuum of care: that is what happens when patients are discharged to these different settings. To do this they will repeat 6-Clicks on each care transition and continue to amass and analyze data. Other extensions will be adding additional outcome measures based on patient issues, and potentially beginning to communicate this data back to patients.

For those daunted by this impressive but long journey, presenter Mary Stilphen offered a few tips to get started on an outcomes journey:

  1. Rally stakeholders
  2. Determine what you want to measure
  3. Understand what change you want to effect
  4. Choose your instruments
  5. Collect data
  6. Share and socialize data

And we would add, keep it simple as evidenced by the thinking behind the 6-Clicks tool.

If you’d like to read more about the 6-Clicks Tool, there’s a great description in this publication.

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, Physical Therapy

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Looking Outside Healthcare To Teach Physical Therapy Business Practice

Recap from APTA CSM 2015

Speakers:

Beth Davis, PT, DPT, MBA

Zoher Kapasi, PT, PhD, MBA

Physical therapists have many choices on what to do after graduating: research, private practice, join an existing business, hospital in-patient and outpatient, and home care to name a few. Some private practice owners we’ve met are evangelical about getting their peers to think in a more business oriented way, and have even hatched at Twitter hashtag #bizPT to focus on these issues. They would have loved this session from two PT/MBAs from Emory School of Medicine. The session was a brief review of an elite elective course in the physical therapy program at Emory called “Business Management for the Physical Therapist Entrepreneur.” The course teaches a broad understanding of business issues, not the nuts and bolts of running a practice rather skills for problem solving, thinking like an entrepreneur, and applying the same methodology students use for medical cases to solve business cases.

#BizPT Usual Suspects

#BizPT Experts

In the course, students are challenged to solve bigger issues in healthcare like rising costs, poor care coordination, and the increasing demands of an aging population. Instructors asked students to look beyond healthcare to other businesses and apply these solutions to healthcare. To warm up this comparative muscle, presenters shared some famous examples of innovation transfer including:

Students are trained to evaluate three types of business cases in what could be seen as a mini-business school education. They tackle decision cases, problem cases, and evaluation cases. Instructors try to help them translate their medical investigation and decision making skills to these cases, which have direct medical analogies. Students are shown how analysis of both medical and business cases have similar phases of:

  • Examination
  • Evaluation
  • Diagnosis
  • Prognosis
  • Intervention
  • Outcomes

The course also helps students talk with business lingo which can prepare them to work in larger practices and hospitals, as well as provides them with critical thinking and problem solving skills that will help them fully participate in both business and clinical work upon graduation.

Using cases from Harvard Business School, topics cover all facets of business including growth, customer service, human resources, operations management, marketing, and information technology. Presenters provided some strategies for applying these technique in private practice as well using staff training or lunch & learn discussions. For the folks tweeting on the #BizPT hashtag this course is a welcome addition to a physical therapy curriculum and it seems to have benefits far beyond private practice.

Posted in: Healthcare transformation, Lean Healthcare, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business, Seattle

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Stroke Rehabilitation is the Poster Child for the Need for Collaborative Care

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Anne Shumway-Cook Lecture: Transforming Physical Therapy Practice for Healthcare Reform

Speaker: Pamela Duncan, PhD

Interdisciplinary teams and patient-centered care are key to the future of healthcare, and physical therapists attending this keynote of the Neurology track at APTA CSM 2015 in Indianapolis were encouraged to embrace this change. Bemoaning the lag time from research to clinical practice, Pam Duncan suggested that researchers find ways to work with interdisciplinary teams of biomechantical engineers and even private companies to bring innovation to patients faster. She started with the inspiring example of Carol Richards who received the Order of Canada for her work with the interdisciplinary team on the Stroke Network Canada, aimed at decreasing the impact of stroke across Canada.

Source @mdaware on Twitter

Source @mdaware on Twitter

Duncan then told a story to explain her passion for changing post-acute stroke care, involving a personal experience that changed the course of her career. Duncan’s mother suffered a stroke and while Duncan was trying to provide comfort in her mother’s last days, a traveling physical therapist arrived in the hospital room with a goal of getting her mother to get her mother to stand, which was apparently the clinical protocol she was assigned to do. Duncan protested and later spoke to the owner of the physical therapy company that had contracted to the hospital. He shrugged and asked her why she cared since Medicare would pay for the visit. Incensed at the waste of time and money but more furious at the way this care completely disregarded the patient’s best interests, Duncan put aside her plans for opening a private practice and focused research to improve post-acute care for stroke patients.

Translating Research to Evidence and the Humble Researcher

With the same vehemence, Duncan described how she believed that over 180 publications she’d made on the topic had done little to advance stroke care, largely due to the difficulty of translating clinical research into practice, and asked the researchers in the audience to change this by developing interdisciplinary teams, questioning all their assumptions, and thinking about the patient holistically, not just from their own discipline.

She asked researchers to be “humble researchers” referencing a column by the New York Times columnist David Brooks and not just set out to prove what they want to be true. Duncan used an example in her own research which disputed a popular belief on stroke recovery and showed that home-based exercise was more effective than treadmill-based. Duncan described herself as still having arrows in her back from that publication.

Best Practices for Stroke Recovery

After lighting a fire for the audience to think about things differently  by saying

“Take off your neuro-plasticity hat and think about patients holistically.”

Duncan continued with specific examples on how to change care. First was to understand the overall situation. 10-30% of stroke patients face permanent disability, something that is not always clear when they are released from hospital within 3-5 days of the incident. She gave an example of a patient who was discharged with care instructions and prescriptions yet when she got home she couldn’t follow them: she discovered the stroke had affected her ability to do basic calculations.

“If you asked if I had discharge instructions I would have said yes, I heard what the nurse said and I showed her I could inject my drugs, and my math deficit wasn’t diagnosed until I got home. I did the things I needed do to get discharged but wasn’t really able to cope.”

This is a clear example of how our current system fails us. It does not support the patient outside the clinic, and yet it’s so much less expensive and more comfortable for the patient to be released to home. Looking at the costs it’s clear that we need to improve home health options.

Post stroke care costs:

  • Acute inpatient care: $8,000
  • Skilled Nursing Facility: $41,000
  • Inpatient Rehab: $14,000
  • Home health: $6,000
  • Long-term care: $62,000

As Duncan put it, “Home health is a dirty word in Washington” yet this where the patient should be. She called stroke the poster child for the discontinuity of care in healthcare as 73% of post stroke readmissions are for other issues not related specifically to the heart. Duncan sees hope though, and called bundled payments the best thing to happen to stroke recovery as providers will have to collaborate across the care continuum.

She sees the benefits as:

  • Coordinated high quality care with seamless transitions
  • One primary metric for integrated care
  • Excellence based on outcomes

The message to physical therapists is that they are uniquely suited to these multi-disciplinary teams focused on patient outcomes. For patients, outcomes are measured by function. For CMS, value is measured by those functional outcomes divided by the cost and physical therapists can deliver on both.

This session was a great kick-off to the conference, which had an overall tone of embracing the changes coming in healthcare and the role of physical therapists in it. As a company providing continuity of care through digital treatment plans and connections with healthcare providers outside the clinic we were inspired to see so many people embracing this change.

Posted in: Aging, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Physical Therapy

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Translating Evidence-Based Interventions to Practice: Falls Prevention and Otago

APTA CSM 2015 Session Recap: Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change

Presenters:

Mary Altpeter, PhD

Tiffany Shubert, PhD

Clinical Support for Otago

Clinical Support for Otago

The fact that a session entitled “Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change “ ended up in the Health Administration /Policy track at APTA CSM 2015 reinforces that we have a long way to go on translating outcomes-based research into care plans. Otago is a proven and effective set of preventative exercises and care for community-dwelling yet frail adults which improves balance and prevents falls risk. It was developed in New Zealand, at the University of Otago over 14 years ago, and prescribes a set of balance and strength exercises that the patient completes independently over 12 months.

Recommended physical therapy visits to access, teach, monitor, and kick-start patient adherence are to occur over 6-8 weeks and after that patients are encouraged to self-manage, and herein lies the reason that this session is in health policy and administration: this is longer than most insurance covers, and there are not currently enough incentives for remote patient monitoring. However, according to presenter Tiffany Schubert, Otago shows an ROI of $1.25 of every dollar invested as it prevents patients from falling which results deterioration to the patient and further burden on the health system.

Barriers to implementing Otago in the US stem largely from reimbursement and the current incident-based payment model that does not facilitate managing patients over a long period of time. As a result, Otago expert and presenter Tiffany Schubert presented an abridged version that might be easier to fit into current payment models.

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

However she is also on a crusade to collect outcomes data for Otago in the US so that these barriers can be overcome as the barriers are not just reimbursement. Clinicians have preconceived notions that patients won’t adhere to plans. Tiffany challenges these misconceptions by asking “are you sure or is it your patients just don’t understand.” We’ve definitely seen this with patients we’ve interviewed: they do want to be adherent to their plans but they find out when they get home that they forgot or are confused. Otago and systems like it work well when there is remote support for the patient.

Clinical Barriers to Implementation

Clinical Barriers to Implementing Otago

Given that Otago requires a high-level of patient self-efficacy, understanding factors that impact behavior change is key in driving long-term outcomes and adherence. Hence, the second half of this presentation, from Mary Altpeter focused on strategies to help patients develop self-management skills to complete the independent part of the program. One of the big misconceptions, that we hear frequently from healthcare providers (and definitely from many of the sensor and tracker vendors), is that knowledge is sufficient to effect change. It’s not, many other factors weigh in including readiness to change and social influences. Understanding more about the patient’s own journey and the patient’s barriers and readiness to change can make a big difference in this area. Also understanding the patient’s goals is crucial and personalizing their risk of not changing their behavior.

Breaking behavior change down into stages can really help move the patient along a path. In this session, Altpeter outlined a 5 stage model to affect patient behavior.

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

Understanding that while your assessment may show that the patient is at risk for falls, the patient may not have internalized this. First step is to plant the seed of doubt while the patient is in what is called the “Pre-Contemplation” stage. You can do this by personalizing the risk.

In a falls scenario, patients are not actually worried about falls risk. This sounds counter intuitive, but patient goals are usually not functional goals they are life goals. (We can attest to this from the goals patients set in Wellpepper.) So, the patient may be worried about losing their driver’s license which might happen if they had limited mobility. This is moving to patient-centered goals from clinical goals which personalizes the risk. Find out what the patient might be afraid of losing and this can start to plant the seed of doubt that they might be at risk for falls.

During the Contemplation phase the healthcare professional can help the patient break down what it might look like to be able to embark on a program. What might be their barriers or sticking points to do so? When might they do it? This isn’t about making a plan it’s about facilitating the patient in thinking that a plan might be possible.

The next phase Preparation, occurs when the patient has demonstrated that he or she is ready to change, and this is where we can examine the nuts and bolts, breaking down what may seem like a daunting task (adhering to a program for 12 years), into something manageable. Here is where you help the come up with plans to overcome the barriers you identified. One key barrier is often fear of relapse: that is that when a patient stops doing the plan, they can’t get back on the wagon, so to speak. Making it okay to “start over” is a great way to encourage patients.

During the preparation phase you may also want to help the patient break down the program into smaller goals and manageable chunks so they can see progress during the program. Also help the patient identify rewards that will help drive their adherence. These are both important steps when helping with a large and often intangible goal.

Action is putting the plan into place. Here your main role is to support the patient, help them continue to overcome barriers, and be a cheerleader to keep them going in the case of a relapse.

The final stage is Maintenance (which includes dealing with Relapse). Pointing out the patient progress, possibly by completing another falls assessment and showing the difference is a great way to reinforce that the program worked and it’s worth continuing. Also ask the patient to remember what fears they had before the program and whether they feel that now. Simply shining a light on their own experience can help a lot here.

With an aging population, and rising health costs, translating valuable and proven research like the information in this session into clinical practice is key. Given that the average time from research to implementation is 17 years, and that Otago was invented 14 years ago, we can only hope to see widespread adoption by 2018. That’s also in-line with CMS’s new requirements for 50% of Medicare spend being for new value and outcome-based models. It’s time right?

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Exercise Physiology, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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Get Your Engines Ready for CSM 2015 Indianapolis

CSM2015Marquee_960x222I’m not a physical therapist, healthcare professional, nor do I play one on TV, but I can’t wait for my third American Physical Therapy Association conference. While I’ll be spending most of my time at our booth (2114 if you’re looking) on the exhibition floor, I’ve managed to find a shortlist of 46 sessions I’d like to attend, and this is from someone who is not looking for clinical practice sessions.

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 11.10.50 AMNext week over 10,000 physical therapists, doctors of physical therapy, PhD researchers, and students will converge on Indianapolis (yes, in winter) for the annual American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. The Combined Sections Meeting or CSM as it’s often referred to (we do love our acronyms in healthcare) combines all the interest groups and professional associations within the association including private practice, oncology, neurology, homecare, acute care, orthopedics, sports medicine, and students and academic researchers. The result is a diversity of topics that represent the major trends in healthcare today including: concussions in youth sports; the impact of the Affordable Care Act on practice; high-intensity interval training; caring for an aging population; managing chronic disease; preventative medicine, health and wellness; healthcare technology; and the psychology of pain.

See for yourself in a selection of some of the 46 sessions we’ve flagged:

Sports Concussions in Youth: The Role of PT for a Surging Population

Transforming Physical Therapy Practice for Healthcare Reform

Exercise Prescription for the Older Adult With Multiple Chronic Conditions

Getting Patients Into Cardiac Rehab and Other Wellness Programs and Keeping Them Exercising After Rehab

Google Glass in Physical Therapy Education and Clinical Practice

High-Intensity Interval Training: Rehab Considerations for Health and Cardiovascular Risk

Practice Issues Forum: Does Medicare Really Cover Maintenance Therapy?

I Have Arthritis. Is My Running Career Over? Evidence-Based Management of the Runner With Osteoarthritis

Called to Care: Integration of Positive Psychology

Integrating Physical Therapy in Emerging Health Care Models

Virtual Reality and Serious Game-Based Rehabilitation for Injured Service Members

Of course, our most anticipated session will be “Use of Mobile Health Technology to Facilitate Long-Term Engagement in Exercise in Persons with Chronic Neurological Conditions” where Dr. Terry Ellis Director of the Center for Neurorehabilitation and a Associate Professor at Boston University will be presenting the results of a study where they used Wellpepper and Fitbit to improve adherence to home exercise programs for people with Parkinson’s disease. For a sneak preview of what she will present, see this article from Inside Sargent Magazine.

As in 2013 and 2014, we will do our best to blog about as many sessions as we can so that if you can’t make it to the conference this year, you can still experience some of the flavor.

If you’re going to CSM, what sessions are you looking forward to most?

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Exercise Physiology, Health Regulations, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Rehabilitation Business, Sports Medicine

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