patient engagement

Archive for patient engagement

Wellpepper Deployment Options

Health Systems have 3 ways to deploy Interactive Treatment Plans at their organization:

  1. Using Wellpepper templates
  2. Leveraging the best practices from Mayo Clinic
  3. Custom Care Plan based on own best practices

Wellpepper Templates

We have a partnership with University of Georgia Medical School, that allows residents to join us on rotation for a month. Through this partnership, and with our excellent research partners, we’ve been able to build care plan templates based on best practice templates for over 30 chronic and acute conditions.

Health Systems may choose to implement these Wellpepper Templates, with minimal effort, which makes this deployment option the quickest.

Mayo Clinic Best Practices

At HIMSS 2018, we announced a partnership with Mayo Clinic to make their best practices available on the Wellpepper platform (here). This allows for health systems to leverage interactive care plans developed with Mayo Clinic content. This is also a very fast deployment and only requires a few configuration decisions from the health system.

Custom Care Plans

The third and most commonly selected option, especially for comprehensive care plans, is to develop an interactive treatment plan based on the Health System’s own best practices. These implementations typically take a bit more time to deploy. One of our tenants is if we can’t do better than paper, then we shouldn’t be doing it. Because of this, we’ll spend additional time going through the existing care plan documentation/discharge instructions and provide guidance and recommendations for how to deliver content digitally in context of where the patients are in their care.

EMR Integration

For initial deployments, we’ll typically see Health Systems choose to start without EMR integration. This is due to competing priorities with IT and allows the Health System to get up and running more quickly.

Shortly after that initial deployment, or in parallel with, we will start to map out what EMR integration looks like, with the goal of streamlining the clinical experience. The graphic below shows several ways that we integrate with EMRs, with the first step frequently being single sign on for patients and clinicians, followed by an ADT feed to onboard patients.

For more information on how to get the most of your deployment, please email me at luke@wellpepper.com.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Interoperability, patient engagement, Using Wellpepper

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Engaging Patients and Impact to Clinical Workflow

One of our goals at Wellpepper is to enable patients to self-manage and we know that if given the right tools, they will do so. While we strive for that exceptional patient experience, we also put a lot of effort into streamlining clinical workflow for onboarding and monitoring patients.

Patient Onboarding

The process for inviting a patient is meant to be simple with a minimal impact to clinical workflow. Capturing basic patient demographics and assigning the appropriate care plan(s); a process that takes 30 seconds to complete. Typically, a scheduler, navigator or health coach will invite patients when they have been identified for an interactive care plan. Ideally, this is done prior to the patient coming into the clinic, but depending on the care plan, this can place at the front desk or in the patient’s room. EMR integration is another way Wellpepper can help streamline this process. You can read a bit more about some of our EMR Integration options in my post about deployment options (here).

Patient Monitoring

Our professional services team will work with your clinical teams to understand all the scenarios where you want to know what your patients are doing when they’re not in the clinic. Using Alerts & Notifications and Machine Learning, we can help make sure that you’re focusing your time on the patients that need help.

Alerting & Notifications

Our sophisticated rules engine enables health systems to build out simple or complex alerting scenarios. These alerting scenarios will generate an alert and notify the care team.

Patients reporting a symptom or side effect is the most commonly used alerting scenario. Our analysis has found that in surgical scenarios, patients that report a symptom or side effect within 3 days after surgery are 3 times as likely to readmit within 30 days. By alerting the care team that a patient is experiencing a symptom or side effect, a care team member can take action and possibly prevent a readmission.

Other Alerting scenarios may include things like patients not doing their exercises, or reporting a blood sugar reading out of the target range.

Machine Learning

One of the areas that we apply machine learning to help streamline clinical workflow is in our HIPAA-compliant messaging system, which allows communication between patients and their care team. Our analysis has shown that 98% of the messages that patients send are not urgent, and 70% of them don’t need a response. Our message classifier looks for the 2% that are urgent and escalates those to the care team.

It’s important to understand all of the points where patients may reach out for help and optimize workflow accordingly. This is another area where integrating with the EMR can help.

For more information on how to streamline clinical workflow while still providing a great patient experience, please email me at luke@wellpepper.com.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Interoperability, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement

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The HIMSS Flu

As usual HIMSS was an overwhelming whirlwind of meetings, opportunities, and information. We had a great show at Wellpepper, and were impressed by a few things. First we heard a lot less about wanting the EMR to do everything. People have realized that especially for all of the patient-facing digital experience, that there need to be interoperable solutions, that are designed with the needs of the end-user in mind. Another thing we noticed was less hype that any one technology (AI, blockchain) was going to be the savior of healthcare. It seems like the market is maturing and there’s an understanding that technology is a key underpinning but only when it’s solving real problems for patients and clinicians. John Moore from Chilmark, who was attending his 11th HIMSS has a great take on this.

Each year, we come away from HIMSS with something we didn’t expect. While it’s usually new leads, partnerships, or competitive intelligence, this year for me, it was the HIMSS flu. Being in a conference center full of technology to diagnose, manage, connect with, and treat sick people, made it seem like a solution should be close by. Ironically, I had meetings with a number of physicians who said that it looked like I had the flu, but couldn’t treat me because they weren’t licensed in Florida. Also, my primary care physician couldn’t help me for this reason as well.

After seeing CirrusMD tweet at my friend and fellow patient-centered care advocate Jan Oldenburg with an offer of a consult, I thought that telemedicine might be the answer.

MDLive came through with a visit code, and I signed up. The sign-up process was pretty painless although an option to clarify where I was physically versus where I lived might have been helpful.

Once I signed up, the app told me it would notify me when it found a physician. This was the slightly confusing part, as when I exited the app and opened it again there was no record that I was in a queue for an appointment, so I started trying to sign up again. Eventually, a video visit came through while I was trying to re-register.

My doctor looked like she was taking calls from home, from the video. Unfortunately, video didn’t work very well from the HIMSS floor—not surprising given the status of the network, so we switched to phone. After a 10 minute conversation, she concluded I had the flu (she was right), and prescribed Tamiflu.

As Jan also found out when she had her asthma attack, the pharmacies near the convention center weren’t actually pharmacies, that is they didn’t offer prescription medication. For Jan it was an expensive Uber to pick up her prescription. For me it was finding a pharmacy that would be open between Orlando and Tampa where were were headed for customer meetings on Friday. By the time I got the prescription, it was 7 hours later, and with Tamiflu the timing matters.

While I was thankful to get care, here are a number of points of friction that made it more difficult than it needed to be, and also show how healthcare really hasn’t adapted to the needs of people:

  • State-based licensure makes telemedicine prohibitive. It also means that you can’t get care from your primary care or other specialists if you’re traveling. Kind of ridiculous that because the patient is physically in Florida suddenly the physician is not licensed to practice.
  • Pharmacies need more delivery options. Even locally, I’ve ended up at pharmacies that don’t take my insurance. Driving around when you’re sick is annoying, and showing up in person when you’ve got the flu is unhelpful for everyone else there.

On the licensure, it’s slow going, but states are starting to have agreements to solve this. On the delivery options, Amazon-drone delivery can’t come fast enough. Overall, the experience wasn’t terrible, and the technology worked but it certainly wasn’t seamless or convenient, and I probably infected a bunch of people while trying to get care. I’d like to apologize to anyone I may have passed the flu along to. I’m not the type to work when sick, but when you’re on the road it’s hard not to.

Also, we’d like HIMSS and all conferences to consider pop-up urgent care. The bandaids in the first-aid room weren’t enough.

Posted in: Healthcare costs, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, HIMSS, M-health, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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See you at HIMSS19

HIMSS19 is a couple weeks away and we have a lot to be excited for!

Stop by and see us in the Personalized Health Experience, Booth 888-96. Alongside our great partners at Ensocare, we will be showcasing our latest product updates, discussing ROI for patient engagement platforms, promoting care plans based on Mayo Clinic best practices, and sharing our vision for the future of patient engagement.

We have a long list of booths to visit and sessions to attend. Below are some of the topics that we’re particularly interested in this year:

We can’t wait to connect with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience. Hope to see you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement

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Machine Learning In Healthcare: How To Avoid GIGO

There’s a commonly used phrase in technology called “garbage in, garbage out” which means that if you start with flawed data or faulty code, you’re going to get lousy output. It results in high-levels of rigor whether that’s in doing user or market research or designing algorithms. Garbage in/Garbage out (or GIGO) is why, although, we are using machine-learning to improve patient engagement and outcomes, at Wellpepper, we’re also slightly skeptical of efforts by big tech (Google, Microsoft, and Amazon) to partner with healthcare organizations to mine their EMR data using machine learning to drive medical breakthroughs. I’ve talked to a number of physicians who are equally skeptical. The reason is that we and especially many physicians are skeptical is that the data in the EMR is frequently poor quality, much of it highly unstructured, and that a major piece of data is missing: the actual patient outcomes. It has what the doctor prescribed but not what the patient did and often what the result was. As well, the data collected in the EMR is designed for billing not diagnosis so it’s more likely the insights will be about billing codes not diagnosis. Why is the data poor quality?

  • A JAMA study found that only 18 percent of EMR notes are original. 46 percent were imported (without attribution) and 36 percent were copied and pasted. Let’s assume that the 18 percent of original notes have no errors, you’re still dealing with 80% of the notes that have a questionable source. This copying and pasting has also contributed to “note bloat” if the data is bad, having more of it will actually hinder the process of finding insights, even for a machine.
  • The data is not standardized. Since so much of the data in the EMR is in these notes, physicians are using different words for the same issue.
  • The dataset from an EMR is biased in several important ways. First, it was entered by physicians and other practitioners, rather than by a broad set of users. The language in healthcare is very different than how patients talk about their health, so these algorithms are unlikely to generalize well outside of the setting where their training data was acquired. Second, data in the EMR has a built-in selection bias towards sick people. Healthy people are probably missing, or at least substantially underrepresented in the dataset. So don’t be surprised if a classifier trained in this setting decides that everyone is sick.
  • Even without copy and paste errors, the data is often just wrong. I once had an intern read back a note to me where she’d recorded my profession as “construction worker”. Yes, I make things, but it’s not nearly as physically taxing and if a physician treating me thought I regularly did heavy labor with my small frame, you can see where over-treatment might be the result.

CNBC’s Christina Farr wrote more about this data problem, the potential for medical errors, and a strange unwillingness to correct the data. A patient quoted in the story understands all too well the problem of GIGO:

“I hope that companies in tech don’t start looking at the text in physician notes and making determinations without a human or someone who knows my medical history very well,” she said. “I’m worried about more errors.”

  • In addition to incorrect data, there are incorrect semantics or examples of physicians using different words for the same issue. In addition to learning medical synonyms which is no small feat, these EMR ML algorithms are going to have to learn grammar too to be truly effective.

Of course, there are solutions to all of these problems and the data quality can be improved with approaches like more standardized input, proof-reading, and possibly using virtual scribes (ironically using machine-learning to speed up input and improve the quality of the data). However the current issues with it make me question whether this is a garbage in/garbage out effort where everyone would be better off starting from cleaner data. The challenge today is that the experts in ML (big tech), don’t have the data, and the experts in the data (healthcare) don’t have the experts in machine learning, so they are partnering and trying to gain some insights from what they have which is arguably very messy data. Another, and possibly more interesting approach is to get a new data set. In 2014, HealthMap showed that you could glean social media data like Twitter, Facebook, and Yelp for health data, and even predict food poisoning faster than the CDC, and now government health organizations have adopted the approach. This is a great example of finding a new data set and seeing what comes of it. At Wellpepper, our growing body of patient-generated data is starting to show insights. In particular we’ve been able to analyze data to find the following, and use this to automate and improve care:

  • Indicators of adverse events in patient-generated messages
  • Patients at 3-times greater risk of readmission from their own reported side-effects
  • The optimal number of care plan tasks for adherence
  • The most adherent cohort of patients
  • The correlation between provider messages and patient adherence to care plan

We also use machine-learning in our patented adaptive notification system that learns from patient behavior and changes notifications and messages based on their behavior. This is a key drive in our high-levels of patient engagement, and can be applied to other patient interactions. While it’s still hard work to find these insights, and then train algorithms on the data sets, we have an advantage because we are also responsible for creating the structure (the patient engagement platform) in which we collect this data :

  • We know exactly what the patient has been asked to do as part of the care plan
  • We have structured and unstructured data
  • Through EMR integration we also have the diagnosis code and other demographic insights on the patient

If you’re interested in gaining new insights about the effectiveness of your own patient-facing care plans delivered to patients outside the clinic, get in touch. You can create a new and clean data stream based on patient-generated data that can start delivering new insights immediately.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement

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Ensocare and Wellpepper Streamline Patient Discharge and Engagement

Ensocare and Wellpepper Streamline Patient Discharge and Engagement

The innovative healthcare companies have partnered to offer care management solutions that enable hospitals to improve the post-acute patient experience.

OMAHA, Neb. – December 6, 2018 – Ensocare, a leading provider of technology-enabled care management solutions, has announced a new partnership with Wellpepper, an award-winning and clinically-validated patient engagement platform used by major health systems to improve outcomes and lower costs of care.

Under the terms of the agreement, Wellpepper’s highly actionable and engaging mobile treatment plans sourced from leading providers such as Mayo Clinic and others will be offered as a supplement to Ensocare’s existing discharge management tool. With Wellpepper, healthcare providers who use the Ensocare Transition application will have the opportunity to customize post-acute treatment plans based on established care protocols enmeshed within the Wellpepper system, creating an unprecedented patient experience.

“Wellpepper was the perfect fit for our organization,” said Luis Castillo, CEO of Ensocare. “One of the biggest challenges we keep hearing about from our hospital and skilled nursing clients is the difficulty of getting patients to adhere to their care plans after leaving the facilities. They’re seeing costly readmissions and care regression that could have been prevented.

“With Wellpepper, we’re able to offer a solution. Their expansive yet endlessly customizable care plans let providers distill complex care into essential components any patient could follow, and I can’t wait to see the positive patient outcomes that occur when our transition software combines with their ingenious treatment plan solution.”

Anne Weiler, CEO and co-founder of Wellpepper, also emphasized the value of the partnership for both patients and providers.

“Partnering with Ensocare was a natural progression of our goals,” said Weiler. “We’re dedicated to helping healthcare providers mitigate the danger of readmission for their most high-risk patients. Ensocare’s transition solutions can be seen as the first step in setting up that treatment plan. If a patient is left to languish in a hospital bed while a case manager struggles to find them a post-acute care setting, that patient is going to immediately be at a disadvantage, regardless of the quality of the care plan. By combining these healthcare IT solutions, a facility can reduce any and all friction that would otherwise occur during the patient’s recovery process.”

Persons interested in learning more about either solution are encouraged to contact Ensocare or Wellpepper to discuss their current situation and explore opportunities to streamline their discharge and patient engagement protocols. Learn more at Ensocare.com and Wellpepper.com.

About Ensocare

Ensocare, a CQuence Health Group company, is a cloud-based solution suite that began as a single care coordination SaaS solution. Today, we are an end-to-end, service-enabled technology platform designed to help hospitals, health systems, physician groups and payers navigate the value-based environment and beyond. Transition, Ensocare’s care placement and referral software, automates the discharge process, effectively transitions patients between care settings and enables coordinated care across the continuum. A growing portfolio of services designed to identify and fill gaps in patient care complement Ensocare’s overall mission to coordinate care, engage patients and positively influence outcomes. For more information, visit www.ensocare.com.


About Wellpepper

Wellpepper is a healthcare technology company with an award-winning and clinically-validated patient engagement platform used by major health systems to improve outcomes and lower costs of care. Wellpepper treatment plans can be customized for each health system’s own protocols and best practices, and personalized for each patient. Wellpepper’s patented adaptive notification system helps drive over 70 percent patient engagement with treatment plans. Wellpepper was founded in 2012 to help healthcare organizations lower costs, improve outcomes and improve patient satisfaction. The company is headquartered in Seattle, Washington. Visit http://www.wellpepper.com/ for more information.

Contact:

Jill Reeves
Ensocare
jreeves@cquencehealthgroup.com
402-758-2617

Jennifer Allen Newton
Bluehouse Consulting Group, Inc. for Wellpepper
jennifer@bluehousecg.com
503-805-7540

Posted in: patient engagement, patient-generated data, Press Release

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Simple Patient-Centered Design

At Wellpepper, we work hard to make sure our software is intuitive, including working with external academic researchers on randomized control trials for people who may have cognitive or other disabilities. This is both to make sure our software is easy-to-use for all abilities, and to overcome a frequent bias we hear about older people not being able to use applications, and also to provide valuable feedback. We’ve found from these studies, the results of which will be published shortly in peer-reviewed journals, that software can be designed for long-term adherence, and this adherence to programs can lead to clinically-meaningful patient outcome improvements.

User-centered design relies on three principles, all of which can be practiced easily, but require continual discipline to practice. It’s easy to assume you know how your users or patients will react either based on your own experiences, or based on prior knowledge. There’s really no substitute for direct experience though. When we practice user-centered design, we think about things from three aspects:

Immersion

Place ourselves in the full experience through the eyes of the user. This is possibly the most powerful way to impact user-centered design, but sometimes the most difficult. Virtual reality is proving to be a great way to experience immersion. At the Kaiser Permanente Center For Total Health in Washington, DC, participants experience a virtual reality tour by a homeless man showing where he sleeps and spends his days. It’s very powerful to be right there with him. While this is definitely a deep-dive immersion experience, there are other ways like these physical therapy students who learned what it was like to age through simple simulations like braces, and crutches. Changing the font size on your screens can be a really easy way to see whether your solution is useable by those with less than 20/20 vision. With many technology solutions being built by young teams, immersion can be a very powerful tool for usable and accessible software.

Observation

Carefully watch and examine what people are actually doing. It can be really difficult to do this without jumping in and explaining how to use your solution. An interesting way to get started with observation is to start before you start building a solution: go and visit your end-user’s environment and take notes, video, and pictures.

Understanding what is around them when they are using your solution may give you much greater insight. When possible we try to visit the clinic before a deployment of Wellpepper. Simple things like whether wifi is available, how busy the waiting room is, and who is initiating conversations with patients can help us understand how to better build administrative tools that fit into the clinician’s workflow. Once you’ve started with observing your users where they will use your solution, the next step is to have them test what you’ve built. Again, it doesn’t have to be complicated. Starting with asking them how they think they would use paper wireframes or voice interface testing with Wizard of Oz scenarios can get you early feedback before you become too attached to your creations.

Conversation

Accurately capture conversations and personal stories. The personal stories will give you insight into what’s important to your users, and also uncover things that you can’t possibly know just by looking at usage data. Conversations can help you with this. The great thing about conversations is that they are an easy way to share feedback with team members who can’t be there, and personal stories help your team converge around personas. We’ve found personal stories to be really helpful in thinking about software design, in particular understanding how to capture those personal stories from patients right in the software by letting them set and track progress against their own personal goals.

Doctor’s often talk about how becoming a patient or becoming a care-giver for a loved one changes their experiences of healthcare and makes them better doctors. This is truly user-centered design, but deeply personal experience is not the only way to learn.

To learn more:

Check out the work Bon Ku, MD is doing at Jefferson University Hospital teaching design to physicians.

Visit the Kaiser Permanente Innovation Center.

Learn about our research with Boston University and Harvard to show patient adherence and outcome improvements.

Read these books from physicians who became patients.
In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Adwish, MD
When Breath Becomes Air Paul Kalanithi, MD

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Research

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Promise, Adoption, and Reality: Dispatches from Connected Health 2018

It’s a rare feat to be engaged, educated, and entertained at the same time, but the Oxford-style debate at Connected Health on telehealth’s effectiveness did all three. Moderated by new Chief Digital Officer for Partners Healthcare, Alistair Erskine, MD, with Ateev Mehrotra, MD debating that telehealth is not effective, and head of the American Telemedicine Association, Andrew Watson, MD debating that it is, the format and discussion delivered a provocative closing session on Day 1 of Connected Health. As decided by the audience, the winner was Dr. Watson, citing effective programs like telestroke, consults and expert referrals, and rural medicine. However, applause for Dr. Mehrotra was also strong, and I suspect that his major points that telehealth has not reached broad adoption, and in fact there have been observations that telehealth is actually increasing utilization as people follow a telehealth visit with an in-person visit. The question is whether that visit wouldn’t have happened and we’d see worse health outcomes, or whether the person had a problem that couldn’t be helped with telehealth.

In another deep dive session on telehealth, “Making Connected Health Work for Physicians”,  Kevin Fickenscher, MD talked about a unique program to train clinicians on virtual visits. Given that the diagnostic capabilities are different, for example, you can’t touch the patient, this makes perfect sense. Questioning and listening skills are going to be more important than physical exam, and observation may be limited by (current) video technology. Also in this session, Ami Blatt MD from Partners, talked about how her young and mobile patients essentially lead her to telemedicine, by insisting that was how they wanted to communicate: the consumerization of healthcare in action. She also recommended to any physicians wanting to deploy a telemedicine solution to make sure that the goals of the program align with the financial incentives available for the hospital.

So, what do we take away from this? Twenty years later, telemedicine is still in the promise stage. Practice and reimbursement needs to change even more to find true breakthroughs, and perhaps we should look at pattern matching to find other successful workflows and outcomes that resemble the benefits for telestroke.

In no particular order, here are some other observations from the conference:

  • Patients are taking a bigger role, whether that was a patient co-presenting in a session on Patient Generated Health data, the Wego Health Awards honoring LupusLady as an activated and collaborative patient, or the society for Participatory Medicine pre-day with patients included, the voice of patients is increasingly being listened to with a real seat at the table.
  • Digital therapeutics and behavioral health are hot. There was a special pavilion on the tradeshow floor dedicated to digital therapeutics where our fellow Seattle health innovators, 2Morrow presented great results from their smoking cessation programs.
  • Patient-generated data is starting to show promise and much greater acceptance by clinicians, particularly in the ability for clinicians and patients to talk to each other. However, we’d still like to see a better connection of data and actionable care plans, and there was still some mention of the data being better because patients cheat when verbally relating data like blood sugar after the fact. Data alone isn’t enough to support patients or change behavior, and it shouldn’t be continued punitive.


From Session: PGHD End User Experience: Patients and Providers

  • There’s a continual blurring of the lines with engagement, particularly member and patient engagement, and there were a ton of new companies in this space (again), all offering to get members and patients engaged. From their overviews it was hard to tell how targeting providers and payers was even different aside from the terminology.
  • Although a full-day devoted to voice interfaces definitely showed it’s a hot topic, AI was definitely the buzzword of the show.

We’re already gearing up for HIMSS 2019 where we hope the buzzword of the show will be “outcomes”. We just heard that our talk on the (really positive) results of the REACH study has been accepted. See you there?

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, HIMSS, M-health, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, patient-generated data, Telemedicine, Voice

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Voice.Health Shows The Promise of Conversational Interfaces

“By embracing voice, healthcare has the opportunity to leapfrog technology from other industries” John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer, Boston Children’s Hospital

Dr. Brownstein was speaking in shared keynote at the Voice.Health summit about why he and other healthcare innovators are so pumped about the opportunity for voice in healthcare. On a later panel Shivdev Rao, MD from UPMC Enterprises described what makes voice a natural fit.

75-80 percent of the signal in a hospital is voice-driven
Shivdev Rao, MD, Vice President, UPMC Enterprises

The one-day concentrated pre-day at Connected Health focused on all things voice tech in healthcare and was kicked off by Klick Health founder and CEO Leerom Segal, who talked about the factors that made this time ripe for voice in the tech industry overall. Putting technology in context is exactly what’s needed at more healthcare events versus a sometimes myopic view of healthcare technology.

So why is voice having a moment?

  • Compute power necessary for processing the large amounts of data that voice creates and requires is now available and relatively inexpensive through cloud offerings from Amazon, Google, and Microsoft
  • Devices are cheap and ubiquitous
  • We’re already trained to expect instant answers but starting to be sensitive to the impact of screen time
  • Voice is seen as more accessible to broader groups
  • And of course, voice is being used as a Trojan horse for commerce (at least by Amazon), for Google it’s for more data

In addition to panels on clinical and consumer impact of voice in healthcare, there was an immersive experience with examples of voice technology in different healthcare settings including clinic, hospital room, operating room, senior home, and an actual home living room. We participated on the consumer panel, and showcased Sugarpod (in the living room since there wasn’t a bathroom.) During the course of the day, and in the keynote at least a hundred potential uses for voice in healthcare were explored. At the same time, participants didn’t shy away from challenges either, like using voice for the wrong purposes like converting pages and pages of web content, or the challenges for people with hearing, cognition, or speech problems to use the devices, all of which can be mitigated with thoughtful voice interaction design, accessibility design, and user testing.

Clinicians have particular concerns about voice. From UPMC, Dr. talked about the challenges of any new and shiny technology in healthcare

As well, similar to what we’ve seen with other technology starting with the real problem of EMR screen time but also including mobile outside the clinic to machine-learning and artificial intelligence, clinicians are concerned about any technology getting between them and their patients. From Robert Stevens, Executive Director and Head of Digital for Novartis summed up what he had heard from physicians “I don’t to be usurped by a smart hockey puck at patient point of care.”

We’re bullish on voice, and agree with Brownstein, that embracing this technology puts healthcare on the cutting-edge technology-wise. It’s also an opportunity for new players, as the incumbents have not proved themselves capable of embracing consumer or end-user centric design that voice requires. We’re also still firmly in the “voice and” camp, looking at voice user interface as one of a number of tools for engaging patients as part of a comprehensive overall digital strategy. Planning and delivering on  a context-aware omni-channel adoption strategy for digital health is another way healthcare has an opportunity to evolve with the overall technology and consumer markets who also haven’t solved this thorny problem.

If you’d like to talk about how to deliver a consistent and engaging omni-channel experience that improves patient outcomes, get in touch sales@wellpepper.com

If you’re interested in voice, check out our other blog posts on the topic:

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Social Media, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Voice

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Voice: The most natural user interface for healthcare

There’s so much promise, and such a natural fit for voice in healthcare that unlike electronic medical records, we should not have to mandate its use. If anything, right now we are being limited by the lack of HIPAA controls rather than end-user demand. If the sessions at the recent Voice Summit, which was focused broadly on voice tech, and the upcoming Voice of Healthcare and Voice Summit at Connected Health conferences are any indication, there are many natural use cases, and a lot of pent-up demand.

With so many concerns about documentation and screens getting between patients and physicians, and the ability to deliver empathy, and to rapidly learn from interactions using natural language processing, and artificial intelligence, voice seems a natural fit and unobtrusive interface that could leapfrog traditional interfaces.

The Healthcare track at Voice Summit showed some of this promise, but also pointed out that we are still early days. Many solutions are pilots or prototypes, and I had the distinct impression that some of today’s HIPAA workarounds would not stand up to a detailed audit. Despite Alexa’s sponsorship of the conference, Google’s strong presence, and both companies push into all things healthcare, both were mum on whether or when their consumer voice devices might be HIPAA compliant. Regardless, healthcare organizations and technology vendors alike are charging forward on new scenarios for healthcare, and you can see by the diversity that if even a few of these end up being the “killer app” it’s a big opportunity.

Patient Care

Rooming: Waiting for a physician to see you in an exam room is often a wasted opportunity. A voice interface in the clinic room, could help further pinpoint why a patient is having a visit or educate pre and post visit on medical issues. Or simply having a voice assistant capture the questions that a patient has during a visit might go a long way to improving the visit.

Inpatient stay: The combination of voice assistants, wifi, and tablets could completely replace expensive and proprietary systems for inpatient patient engagement. We’re already seeing use cases for anonymous interactions with voice devices to order food, check the time, or find out the time of the next physician visit.

Long-term care: Alzheimers and dementia care are cited as the poster child for the benefits of voice in long-term care facilities. Unlike human caregivers, voice assistants never get tired of answering the same questions repeatedly. There are so many times you don’t want Saturday Night Live to predict the future, but with this one they got it right.

Patient Engagement

If we define patient engagement as interactions outside the clinic, then the opportunities today fall into three main categories triage (or eventually diagnosis), education, and self-management.

Triage Skills: Today we see some basic triage skills from organizations like Mayo Clinic, and Boston Children’s Hospital where you can check some basic first aid, or ask common questions about children’s health. While there are approximately 1,000 healthcare skills, most likely there will be a few winners or “go-to” experiences here from leading healthcare organization or trusted publishers like WebMD. (Interestingly, the presenter from WebMD was one of the more skeptical on voice experiences for patients at the Voice Summit, possibly because of the complexity of the information they present through text, video, and images on the Web.)

Health Education: Chunking content into manageable bites is currently being touted as the best practice for education material through voice. However, this is an area where the interactivity that’s possible through voice will be necessary for stickiness. If you think about the best podcasts, they use different techniques to both engage you and also impart knowledge: interviewing, verbatim quotes, sound effects, interjections, and expository material. To get engaging and sticky health education content, publishers will have to think about how to test for knowledge, advance explanations, and interact with the end-users. Since we can only remember 5 things at a time, simply chunking content is not going to be enough to make the delivery of health education through voice stick.

Reminders and Interactive Health Tasks: As we’ve seen from our testing, where voice interfaces may have the most impact for patients is in helping them complete health tasks for example, in medication adherence, simple surveys, or check-ins and reminders of basic information. Given that the voice interface is a natural in the home, checking in with a voice assistance on when to take medication, or tracking meals is an easy way to engage with a care plan. As well, cloud-based interactive voice response systems could call patients with reminders and check-ins.

Clinical Notes

Conquering the pain of charting is possibly the closest term opportunity for voice in healthcare. With every increasing workloads, and the need to capture information digitally for both care and reimbursement, the EMR has been blamed for physician burnout and lack of job satisfaction. Microsoft recently partnered with UPMC to use their Cortana voice assistant to transcribe clinical notes during a patient/provider interaction. Others attacking this space include SayKara, Robin, and incumbent, Nuance Communications. With HIPAA compliance, it’s hard not to imagine Amazon and Google looking at it as well.

Hands-free lookup

Voice really shines as an interface when your hands are not free, like driving, dentistry, or when you need to keep your hands clean. Voice is a natural in settings where touching a screen or device can cause contamination or distraction. Simplifeye is tackling this in dentistry to improve charting, and lookup of x-rays, and we expect this to infiltrate all aspects of healthcare.

You may have seen a recent article on why Alexa is not ready for healthcare primetime. With all of these great examples it’s hard to believe it. It turns out that the criticisms in this article basically highlight the current limitations of voice overall (except for HIPAA compliance of course). However, some of the challenges of discovery, context, and navigation, are why we at Wellpepper believe in not just voice, but a “Voice And” future where voice is a key interface that is helped or helps others like screens or even augmented reality. Voice is powerful, “Voice And” will be even better.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, HIPAA, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, patient-generated data, Voice

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Voice Tech In Healthcare

Voice tech is a hot topic in healthcare, and for good reason. Healthcare is built on personal interactions, and voice technology can replicate and even replace the human interviewing experience. Voice has other valuable benefits in healthcare like being hands-free—for someone who is recovering from surgery and mobility challenged this might mean being able to get information without getting up. In the hospital setting, the hands-free interface has obvious benefits for hygiene.

At Wellpepper we first started experimenting with voice-enabling our interactive care plans in early 2017, and dug deeper into the topic, prototyping voice powered devices and testing with real people as part of our winning entry in the Alexa Diabetes Challenge. I’ll be talking more about this at the Voice Summit July 24-26, 2018 in Newark.

However, voice experiences in healthcare are not new. This week the Seattle Design for Healthcare meetup Ilana Shalowitz, Voice Design UI Manager, from EMMI Systems (part of Wolters-Kluwer) talking about best practices for voice design based her work on their interactive voice response system. This system effectively does outreach through “robocalls” to help influence people’s behavior, like getting them to schedule general health primary care visits, or get a flu shot. The pathways are designed to guide the patient through specific material, ensuring a basic understanding of the topic, and moving to take action (although not actually taking action), since that was not possible in the interface.

While they have been effective at changing patient behavior, the talk got me thinking about the differences between the interaction model for more traditional, non-AI based interactive voice response and the voice assistants like Alexa and Okay Google popping up in the home, the challenges of each, and the opportunities in healthcare.

Interactive voice response (IVR) can provide a structured pathway, which could be akin to an intake form or an interview. However, it doesn’t allow for an end-user driven experience. In her session, Shalowitz talked about designing a path to give the end user the illusion of control, where a yes or no answer to a knowledge question actually ended up in the same place. Compare that to the home voice experiences where the end user can drive any experience. The upside of this experience is that the end-user is in control, which is often not the case in healthcare, and can drive the direction of the conversation.

Here’s a common experience interacting with a Wellpepper care plan.”

Person: “Alexa, tell Wellpepper I have pain.”
Alexa: “Okay, what is your pain on scale of 0-10 where 0 is no pain, and 10 is the worst pain imaginable.”
Person: “Four”
Alexa: “Okay, I’ve recorded your pain as 4 out of ten. Is that correct?”
Person: “Yes.”
Alexa: “Anything else?”

The difference between this and a typical IVR communication is that the end-user is the initiator. However, the drawback with this type of scenario is that the end-user needs to know what they want to do. This is a notorious problem with headless interfaces like voice. In fact, each week, I get an email from the Alexa team that tells me what new thing I can do with Alexa, essentially a print-guide for the voice interface. Discoverability, context, and capabilities remain problems with these interactions even while they put the end-user at the center.

However, the benefits of these new consumer tools is that, they are designed to not anticipate each pathway in advance, and rather than the pre-recorded prompts of traditional IVR, they are learning systems where continual improvement can be made by examining successful and failed intents. We saw this is in our testing when a patient told Alexa he was “ready when you are.”

I’m excited to be heading to the Voice Summit this coming week, where we’ll talk about what we learned in the Alexa Diabetes challenge, and how we’re applying voice to all our patient experiences at Wellpepper. It’s still early days, but we see a lot of promise, and patients love it.

“Voice gives the feeling someone cares. Nudges you in the right direction.”
Test patient with Type 2 diabetes

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, patient engagement, Voice

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Investing in primary care

The US healthcare system is an underperformer (highest healthcare spending for the lowest health system performance) compared to the other ten economically advantaged countries primarily due to differences in access, administrative inefficiency, disparities in healthcare delivery, and also due to the illogical underinvestment in primary care. Despite evidence by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health that the regions in which a higher percentage of Medicare beneficiaries receive majority of their care from a primary care physician lends to overall lower costs, higher quality of care, and lower rates of avoidable hospitalizations, the US continues to underinvest in primary care relative to other nations. Because of perverse incentives and overall fragmentation that is rampant in American healthcare, conscious and deliberate effort is needed to keep primary care at the forefront of clinical practice and population health improvement, including:

  • Implementation of quality improvement practices that have a theoretical basis
    According to Harvard Medical School’s Center for Primary Care established in 2011, there are five components necessary in improving primary care including evidence-based change concepts and tools, fostering strong relationships within and across practices, simple systems for reflection and feedback, structured time for team discussion and planning, and regular and meaningful engagement of leaders. The general theme is that quality improvement processes that have been validated (e.g. PDSA cycle) and implementation of driver diagrams that break up larger processes into smaller chunks/concepts have value and are worth the time to problem solve.
  • Prioritizing patient-centered care
    Care should be collaborative with patients’ preferences and values in the context of their socioeconomic conditions being respected. If there is less information asymmetry in clinical practice, then patients can be more active participants in their healthcare. Overall quality would improve with cost savings, as patient engagement research has demonstrated. Truly understanding a patient’s capacity and health literacy will improve a primary care physician’s ability to be effective in delivering patient-centric care.
  • Payer reimbursement for provider innovation in preventive and multidisciplinary care
    Primary care prioritization with the US healthcare system depends on heavy investment from payers because of the nature of reimbursement for clinicians’ time and services. In addition to a value-based compensation model that payers like Blue Cross Blue Shield reward providers with, more creative and interdisciplinary measures could be more payer driven. Humana’s Bold Goal program is a partnership between an influential payer and San Antonio Health Advisory board to partner with HEB grocery stores, community clinicians, and the YMCA to increase patients with diabetes’ better nutritional understanding of their choices. Because of the cost savings involved with more investment in primary care, it would make sense that payers would be incentivized towards this trend.
  • Leveraging of non-clinical members of a team to deliver comprehensive, value-based care
    Substantial evidence suggests that patients do not receive all of the preventive and chronic disease care that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises on the basis of its best evidence because clinicians simply don’t have the time. Oak Street Health is a Chicago based network of value-based primary care centers that developed a clinical informatics specialist program 2014 where technical scribes were able to provide evidence-based recommendations and data support which resulted in improved effectiveness metrics, overall operational efficiency, and physician joy of practice.

Investment in primary care is necessary for the US healthcare system to have improved outcomes. Efforts at the community level, reinforced by theoretical models and financially backed by payers, are necessary in making changes that can yield significant population health improvements.

Posted in: Healthcare costs, Healthcare Policy, patient engagement

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Behavioral changes with deliberate patient engagement

Based on the NEJM Catalyst survey regarding the differences between initiating and maintaining behavior change, in-person social support (followed by virtual social support) ranked the highest in sustaining long-term behavioral changes. Members of the council who participated in the survey believed that continued and consistent contact with patients influenced sustainable changes. The combination of human interaction plus digital tools reinforcing the relationship appear to be the best strategy. Even though there has been a gradual shift away from the fee-for-service culture, it still seems impractical for physicians to invest even more time into patient engagement given current constraints of the healthcare system (e.g. clinicians rarely have enough time to get through all the evidence based teaching necessary let alone focus on other factors seemingly non-clinical). Clinicians often give up motivating and influencing their patients, especially after they see marginal gains (or lack thereof) over the course of several years with patients who have chronic illnesses. You have burned out and cynical clinicians on one hand and patients who love inertia on the other. The irony is that if clinicians were to spend more time towards patient engagement, then there would be more impetus for patients to self-manage and be more accountable in their care and outcomes. Research has demonstrated that patient engagement leads to better health outcomes and reduces overall costs. Ultimately, patients being active participants in their healthcare leads to sustainable, long-term behavioral changes. In order to practice medicine effectively, efficiently, and to allow patients to extract the most out of the healthcare services they receive, clinicians should make attempts at patient engagement in a more deliberate manner with different strategies:

  • Model after other human service businesses

One of the reasons that luxury car dealerships, financial planners, and boutique firms across a range of industries are so effective with their clientele is due to their shameless persistence in engaging with their customers. They seem to be very regimented in their follow-up without it appearing overly contrived. What if clinicians could adopt that kind of style with their patients? A combination of phone calls and digital contact seems appropriate – even leaving a voicemail in the evening as follows could signal enough persistence: “I sent you an email asking you if you’ve ever been tested for Thalassemia about a week ago– I think you are iron deficient for other reasons, but I want to make sure we’re covering all our bases for your condition.  If I don’t hear from you this week, I’ll be discussing this with you at your next appointment in 2 weeks.”

  • Blend a style between a motivational coach and psychologist

Motivational coaches who are very effective typically try to leverage emotional vulnerabilities and emotional language in very explicit ways to enforce change. Psychologists tend to non-judgmentally allow clients to form conclusions by themselves. Clinicians are often balancing these two approaches to avoid both paternalism as well as the snail-paced results of motivational interviewing. Language could be blended, with elements of idealism and also allowing for patient autonomy: “The pain of discipline is nothing compared to the pain of regret. You’ve recently had a lapse, but if you stick with the diet that you initially were so good with, what do you think it will do for your diabetes? Can you imagine what life will be like?”

Clinicians are never at risk of overinvesting in communication skills, as this is necessary to strike the right balance in influencing patients over the long-run. They would benefit from practices and processes in other industries where contact is consistent and maintained over a continuum with the assistance of digital technologies.

 

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, patient engagement

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Healthcare Transformation: Emulating Disney Is Not A Bad Idea

Last week, I had the privilege of speaking to a group of CMIOs about disruption and consumerism in healthcare. We had a lively discussion, with the two main takeaways being that having a broad digital strategy is key, and also that healthcare really needs to find its own way to delivering the things consumers want. While looking to other industries for inspiration is a good way to think about change, blindly implementing strategies without thinking about how to adapt them for your own industry is not a good path.

We started off the discussion with this quiz from Elizabeth Rosenthal, former physician and health editor of the New York Times, and author of An American Sickness. Try it for yourself: it’s fun to try to figure out which is the hospital and which is the luxury hotel. (The CMIOs got 8/12 correct. Can you beat them?)

This prompted a debate about how much environment matters to healing, and why hospitals have no “back office.” Having a calming environment can definitely promote healing, however, it wasn’t clear from some of the images presented in the quiz whether healing or luxury was the goal.

Adopting ideas from other industries without fully understanding their priorities and understand how they might differ from your goals. For example, people may complain about the Disneyfication of healthcare, and point to managing to the HCHAPS survey as driving this and other evils. However, did you know that Disney’s #1 corporate value is safety? Adopting safety as a number one organizational value in healthcare would be completely relevant and appropriate. What has happened with these hotel-like experiences is adopting the surface of what Disney stands for without understanding the core goals and objectives of the experience or of the patient, or even of what Disney is trying to achieve.

Recently I received this in the mail from UnitedHealthcare.

Much has been written about the power of hand-written notes, however, usually within business situations and often from a senior manager to a junior manager. This, however, is not a good use of a handwritten note. It’s so many kinds of wrong, and bordering on creepy, especially since I had just gone for my annual physical.

The pressure to deliver better service, and better outcomes is not going to decrease in healthcare. However, it’s easy to avoid these types of pitfalls by considering what people are really looking for. This might not be the same for all patients, but we think this sets up a good framework to approach consumerization.

In addition to thinking about how your offerings, outreach, and engagement with patients fulfills these needs, going a step further, you could try to think about which one of these is most important to each individual patient, and that’s really the crux of delivering a great patient or consumer experience.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Meaningful Use, Outcomes, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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HIMSS 2018…See you there!

HIMSS17 in Orlando was a great conference for Wellpepper. We’re looking forward to HIMSS18 in Las Vegas even more!

We have a long list of sessions to attend and booths to visit, but below are some places you’re guaranteed to find us:

Monday, March 5th

  • Hear from Tami Deangelis on how our research partners at Boston University engaged patients outside the clinic and improved outcomes using Wellpepper care plans. She is speaking at the “Remote Patient Messaging for Adherence and Engagement” session from 4:05pm-4:25pm at the Patient Engagement & Experience Summit

Tuesday, March 6th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CTO, Mike Van Snellenberg will be demonstrating our voice-powered scale and foot scanner, and integrated diabetes care plan at the Industry Showcase at BHI & BSN 2018 https://bhi-bsn.embs.org/2018/industry-showcase/

Wednesday, March 7th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-6pm
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be sharing the Wellpepper Vision and Mission at HIMSS VentureConnect http://www.himssconference.org/education/specialty-programs/venture-connect
  • CEO, Anne Weiler, will be joining other industry leaders to continue the conversation with CMS toward inclusion of patient engagement and outcomes tracking in the MIPS Improvement Activity for provider reimbursement

Thursday, March 8th

  • Hall G, Innovation Zone: Booth 9900-78 from 9am-4:30pm

We can’t wait to connect with friends, partners, colleagues and industry leaders to continue the journey towards an amazing patient experience. Hope to see you there!

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Outcomes, patient engagement, Uncategorized

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Supporting Patient Motivation

What motivates people to improve their health and stay on the right track over time?

This question is on the mind of every practitioner, whether it’s a physician sending someone home with a wound care plan, a nutritionist giving dietary advice to help manage diabetes or a physical therapist providing exercises to get a frozen shoulder moving again. They’re thinking: “Will the patient do it?” To a great extent, the answer to this question determines how successful their treatment plans will be.

Some of this blog’s most popular posts have explored the issue of motivation because it is a major underpinning of patient engagement technology – will the patient use, and stick with, the technology that in turn helps them adhere to their care plans?

The subject of motivation usually starts with a discussion about goal-setting. This process, at least in the medical context, typically begins when the practitioner sets goals for the patient and provides a care plan that tells the patient what they need to do in order to get there. Some practitioners feel this should be motivation enough for a patient. In reality, they know it’s not.

So what is motivation? A great deal of research has gone into the subject, particularly with regard to behavior change. It is most often described as being either extrinsic (outside the individual) or intrinsic (inside the individual). With extrinsic motivation, we engage in a behavior or activity either to gain some sort of external reward or avoid a negative consequence. With intrinsic motivation, we engage in something because we find it personally fun or rewarding.

While these are the two areas most often discussed, there are other, deeper dimensions to motivation, including fear-based and development-based motivators – and these can be either extrinsic or intrinsic. Understanding the interplay among these different forms of motivation is an important element in successful health coaching and in the creation of successful, supportive technologies that assist people in reaching their health goals.

Fear-based motivation comes in two basic flavors: deficiency-based and threat-based. Deficiency-based motivations come from the sense you are lacking in some way. These can have an external, socio-cultural source (just watch any personal care product advertisement: you smell bad, your hair is the wrong color and your teeth aren’t nearly white enough) or an intrinsic source (e.g. internal pressure “shoulds,” self-imposed discipline or overcoming the deficiency of lost health). Threat-based motivations tap into fear at a deeper level. In the world of medicine, this might be a medical incident that serves as a wake-up call, and the threat of disability or death propels a person to make serious lifestyle changes.

Development-based motivation tends to come from the desire for personal growth or self-actualization. It can also be externally sourced (e.g. from positive peer health norms or positive environmental conditions like smoke-free public spaces) or intrinsic – from the satisfaction, pleasure or joy we derive from doing something.

Research has shown that while fear can be a great motivator for getting people started on something, the positive, development-based motivators tend to be more powerful in keeping people engaged and active in behavior change over the longer term.

I believe one of the reasons the Wellpepper patient engagement platform is so successful at driving patient engagement with care plans (70% engagement compared to an average of 20% engagement with portals) is because the Wellpepper team understands this complex motivation dynamic very well and they have incorporated some of the most successful elements from it into their platform. They call it the “3rd approach” and here’s why I think it works.

Wellpepper takes a very obvious extrinsic motivator – the practitioner’s care plan – and turns it into an application that incorporates both intrinsic and extrinsic development-based motivators that keep people engaged over time. There are many layers we could explore here, but we’ll start with a few of the big ones.

Setting aspirational goals: In addition to the functional goals set by the practitioner, Wellpepper provides the ability for patients to set their own personally meaningful, aspirational goals that can support and reinforce their motivation to heal. For example, someone recovering from a total joint replacement operation might set a future vision of wanting to hike to their favorite fishing spot with a grandchild. They can use Wellpepper to set interim goals that lead them toward that vision and can rate their own progress on a Likert scale.

Research in positive psychology has shown that this kind of personal vision and goal setting is highly successful at sustaining motivation over time. In this case the patient is more likely to complete their prescribed exercises because it leads them toward goals that are personally meaningful about their own healing and about doing something special with someone they love.

Personalized experience: Wellpepper also provides a personalized experience for the patient. Using the same joint replacement example, instead of getting a piece of paper with a series of exercise diagrams or a generic video, the practitioner can record the patient doing their own exercises. Seeing yourself, and hearing the personal comments of the physician or physical therapist as you do it, is not only easier to follow, it feels personal. And, as you begin to improve, when you watch yourself then and now, seeing your own progress can be very satisfying (a powerful development-based motivator).

Adaptive notification: Wellpepper’s patented adaptive notification system means the patient doesn’t get the same generic reminder every day – it changes the notification based on the patient’s progress and level of engagement, keeping the extrinsic motivator relevant, fresh and focused on personal development.

Tracking progress: By enabling people to track progress on their goals and sharing that information with their practitioners, patients tap into positive, extrinsic motivation. Also tracking progress on personal, aspirational goals helps people feel a greater sense of accomplishment and direction over their own developmental outcomes.

While motivation for any one individual can be elusive, the way Wellpepper weaves together the positive extrinsic and intrinsic development-based motivators may be the key to its success in helping patients stay motivated and helping practitioners answer the age-old question: “Will the patient do it?”

If they’re using Wellpepper, chances are, they will.

Jennifer Allen Newton is Wellpepper’s PR lead, and also a Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach. 

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Physical Therapy

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The Secrets of Strong CIO and CMIO Relationships

What’s the secret of a strong CIO and CMIO relationship? Many things including the ability to be adaptable, understand organizational priorities, and deadlines, but most importantly to align on shared goals and purpose.

These were some of the takeaways from the insights shared by CIOs and CMIOs of Confluence Health, and EvergreenHealth at the annual Washington State HIMSS Executive dinner. While the conversation was split between how to foster innovation, and how to manage the demands of an EMR rollout (including the resulting backlog of other IT requests), where the relationship really shone was in the implementation of tools for a shared purpose, in this case tracking and control of opioids to help curb the epidemic we’re seeing in this country.

In particular a project at EvergreenHealth to implement e-prescribing of controlled substances, showed the need for strong CMIO and CIO collaboration. The program is designed to decrease fraud and misuse of controlled substances, but it can also improve patient care. Since it involves both technology implementation and clinical guidelines it’s a perfect example of medical and technology collaboration. In Washington State, where we’re based, the Bree Collaborative also has recommended guidelines for prescribing opioids, that while optional are widely adopted across the state.

We’ve written about this problem before in pain management for total joint replacement. Sadly, an unintended consequence of the pain management question on the HCAHPS survey, is sometimes an overprescribing of prescription pain medication. According to one speaker at the event, 30mg of oxycontin over 7 days is enough to trigger an addiction, and yet often post-surgery up to 30 days of pills are prescribed. We talked to one patient (not a Wellpepper user) who reported taking all of her prescribed pain medication, not because she needed it but because it was prescribed. The first step to solving this problem is with the prescription, and EvergreenHealth’s e-prescription program, combined with locked cabinets in the operating room (the idea is that if you don’t need it immediately, you don’t actually need it), alerts on over prescribing, and programs to substitute suboxone, coupled with behavior health management can all help. As well behavior change happens with the physicians, and a powerful image was the story of a pharmacist who put a bag of unused opioid prescriptions on the table to show that even if they didn’t think so, some physicians may have been over-prescribing.

However there are ways to take it a step further: tracking what the patient actually took outside the clinic, which is why we include a pain medication usage task in many care plans. This activity asks patients some simple questions about their over-the-counter and prescribed pain medication usage, and alerts if the numbers or the length of time is over certain thresholds. It’s in use in care plans that include general pain management, surgical, and neurology (headache management), and provides a view into usage, and the opportunity to reach out and help patients outside the clinic before usage becomes a problem.

We’re strong believers in the ability for patients to record their own outcomes and experiences, and the value of combining this with prescribing and clinical data to close the loop on delivering better care. If you’re interested in learning more, get in touch.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare Legislation, HIPAA, Opioids, Outcomes, patient engagement

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