HIMSS

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Promise, Adoption, and Reality: Dispatches from Connected Health 2018

It’s a rare feat to be engaged, educated, and entertained at the same time, but the Oxford-style debate at Connected Health on telehealth’s effectiveness did all three. Moderated by new Chief Digital Officer for Partners Healthcare, Alistair Erskine, MD, with Ateev Mehrotra, MD debating that telehealth is not effective, and head of the American Telemedicine Association, Andrew Watson, MD debating that it is, the format and discussion delivered a provocative closing session on Day 1 of Connected Health. As decided by the audience, the winner was Dr. Watson, citing effective programs like telestroke, consults and expert referrals, and rural medicine. However, applause for Dr. Mehrotra was also strong, and I suspect that his major points that telehealth has not reached broad adoption, and in fact there have been observations that telehealth is actually increasing utilization as people follow a telehealth visit with an in-person visit. The question is whether that visit wouldn’t have happened and we’d see worse health outcomes, or whether the person had a problem that couldn’t be helped with telehealth.

In another deep dive session on telehealth, “Making Connected Health Work for Physicians”,  Kevin Fickenscher, MD talked about a unique program to train clinicians on virtual visits. Given that the diagnostic capabilities are different, for example, you can’t touch the patient, this makes perfect sense. Questioning and listening skills are going to be more important than physical exam, and observation may be limited by (current) video technology. Also in this session, Ami Blatt MD from Partners, talked about how her young and mobile patients essentially lead her to telemedicine, by insisting that was how they wanted to communicate: the consumerization of healthcare in action. She also recommended to any physicians wanting to deploy a telemedicine solution to make sure that the goals of the program align with the financial incentives available for the hospital.

So, what do we take away from this? Twenty years later, telemedicine is still in the promise stage. Practice and reimbursement needs to change even more to find true breakthroughs, and perhaps we should look at pattern matching to find other successful workflows and outcomes that resemble the benefits for telestroke.

In no particular order, here are some other observations from the conference:

  • Patients are taking a bigger role, whether that was a patient co-presenting in a session on Patient Generated Health data, the Wego Health Awards honoring LupusLady as an activated and collaborative patient, or the society for Participatory Medicine pre-day with patients included, the voice of patients is increasingly being listened to with a real seat at the table.
  • Digital therapeutics and behavioral health are hot. There was a special pavilion on the tradeshow floor dedicated to digital therapeutics where our fellow Seattle health innovators, 2Morrow presented great results from their smoking cessation programs.
  • Patient-generated data is starting to show promise and much greater acceptance by clinicians, particularly in the ability for clinicians and patients to talk to each other. However, we’d still like to see a better connection of data and actionable care plans, and there was still some mention of the data being better because patients cheat when verbally relating data like blood sugar after the fact. Data alone isn’t enough to support patients or change behavior, and it shouldn’t be continued punitive.


From Session: PGHD End User Experience: Patients and Providers

  • There’s a continual blurring of the lines with engagement, particularly member and patient engagement, and there were a ton of new companies in this space (again), all offering to get members and patients engaged. From their overviews it was hard to tell how targeting providers and payers was even different aside from the terminology.
  • Although a full-day devoted to voice interfaces definitely showed it’s a hot topic, AI was definitely the buzzword of the show.

We’re already gearing up for HIMSS 2019 where we hope the buzzword of the show will be “outcomes”. We just heard that our talk on the (really positive) results of the REACH study has been accepted. See you there?

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, HIMSS, M-health, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, patient-generated data, Telemedicine, Voice

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HIMSS 2018: We’re having a party in your house!

From the opening keynote of HIMSS 2018, you could tell things were going to be different. Unlike last year, where actors touted the marvels of flash drives and backup storage, this year kicked off with singers from The Voice. Not sure how to interpret their music choices, though, I’m sure Leonard Cohen never envisioned his anthem Hallelujah pumping up 45,000 healthcare IT experts.

Keynote speaker Eric Schmidt executive chairman of Alphabet, admonished the crowd to get to the cloud, any cloud, even Google Cloud’s competitors. He also described a scenario with an assistant named Liz, listening in on a doctor/patient visit and transcribing notes. Ironically, this exact scenario was announced by Microsoft the week before. I’ve witnessed shifts to digital and cloud before in other industries, and it does take a village, so Eric calling on the power of the technology and being rather vendor agnostic is a good sign. That said, there were a few things in his talk that might have ruffled his audience. First, where were the partners? In the utopia of voice and cloud for healthcare that Schmidt described the only partner referenced was Augmedix, poster child for Google Glass, and absolutely no healthcare system examples. Which makes sense, as when asked by HIMSS president emeritus, Steven Lieber for his parting words to the crowd, Schmidt said:

“You’re late to the party.”

Which is an interesting comment at as he was a guest keynote speaker at a healthcare IT event and representing big tech, so you could interpret this to mean:

“You’re late to the party (that we’re throwing in your house).”

As the keynote emptied in a mass stream to the tradeshow floor, I eavesdropped on a number of conversations, and many people weren’t too happy about the message: “they (aka tech) don’t understand how complicated our lives are.” It’s an interesting conundrum, because Google et al have solved some pretty complicated problems making sense of what we’re all looking for online, a problem of completely unstructured data, and yet, as recent Facebook incidents show, there can be a lack of respect for people’s data and privacy that is crucial for any type of healthcare deployment in big tech.

The tradeshow floor itself showed a lot of new entrants, including booths from Lyft and Uber, who previously had only partnered with companies like Circulation for medical transportation, and a much larger Google Cloud and Amazon Web Services presence than the previous year. Microsoft and IBM have been at the healthcare party for a long time, and have settled in.

Big tech is indeed at the party. Who else is at the party? Purveyors of security and in particular block-chain crypto were definitely there. We saw APIs hanging around the punch bowl, this time invited by the new Blue Button 2.0 initiative, unlike previous years as the date of big tech.

Who wasn’t at the party? Patients. On the one hand, we’ve found that the digital patient experience and patient engagement is now mainstream, and our research partner Tamara Deangelis from Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation was awesome talking about patient/provider messaging at the patient engagement summit. At the broader HIMSS conference, it seemed only vendors were representing patients. Most of the patient invitations must have gotten lost in the mail.

One CIO I talked to suggested that there was a different feeling at HIMSS this year and that this is the year we’ll look back and see that things really changed for healthcare IT. We’ve seen an acceleration of the shift to the cloud for new patient-facing applications, and a rapid realization of a need for an overall patient digital strategy. All heartening, especially since it will take everyone at the party to accomplish this transformation, debutantes and charming hosts alike.

Until next year’s party, cheers!

(Footnote: The actual Google Cloud party had a long line immediately, so some people heeded Schmidt’s words about not being late for the fantastic view of the Bellagio fountains, poke bowls, and open bar. The party was predominantly male, which hopefully isn’t part of the vision. Of course, it was at the same time as the Women in Healthcare IT event, which I heard was awesome. Perhaps a poor party choice on my part.)

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, HIMSS, Interoperability

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