Behavior Change

Archive for Behavior Change

What Motivates You, May Not Motivate Me

At Wellpepper our goal is to empower people to be able to follow their care plans and possibly change their behavior, so we think a lot about how to motivate people. Early on when working with Terry Ellis, Director of the Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation, wanted to make sure that our messages to patients that may struggle with adherence were positive. She works with people who have Parkinson’s disease, and stressed that while they may improve symptoms they would not “get better.”

Last week I had a similar conversation with an endocrinologist about diabetes care plans. People with chronic diseases are often overwhelmed and may take a defeatist attitude to their health. Feedback and tools need to be non-judgmental and encouraging. Ideas like “compliance” and “adherence” may not be the way to look at it. Sometimes the approach should be “something is better than nothing.” And humans, not just algorithms need to decide what “good” is.

Am I good or great?

Here’s an example, non-healthcare related of algorithmic evaluation gone wrong. Rather than applauding me for being in the top tier of energy efficient homes, the City of Seattle, says I’m merely “good.” There’s no context on my “excellent” neighbors, for example are they in a newly built home compared to my 112 year old one, and no suggestions on what I might want to do to become “excellent. (Is it the 30-year old fridge?) I’m left with a feeling of hopelessness, rather than a resolve to try to get rid of that extra 2KW. Also, what does that even mean? Is 2KW a big deal?

Now imagine you’re struggling with a chronic disease. You’ve done your best, but a poorly tuned algorithm says you’re merely good, not excellent. Well, maybe what you’ve done is your excellent. This is why we enable people to set their own goals and track progress against them, and why care plans need to be personalized for each patient. It’s also why we don’t publish stats on overall adherence. Adherence for me might be 3 out of 5 days. For someone else it might be 7 days a week. It might depend on the care plan or the person.

As part of every care plan in Wellpepper, patients can set their own goals. Sometimes clinicians worry about the patient’s ability to do this. These are not functional goals, they represent what’s important to patients, like family time or events, enjoying life, and so on. We did an analysis of thousands of these patient-entered goals, and determined that it’s possible to track progress against these goals, so we rolled out a new feature that enables patients to do this.

Patient progress against patient-defined goal

Success should be defined by the patient, and outcome goals by clinicians. Motivation and measures need to be appropriate to what the patient is being treated for and their abilities. Personalization, customization, and a patient-centered approach can achieve this. To learn more, get in touch.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, patient engagement, patient-generated data

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Introducing Sugarpod by Wellpepper, a comprehensive diabetes care plan

We’re both honored and excited to be one of five finalists in the Alexa Diabetes Challenge. We’re honored to be in such great company, and excited about the novel device our team is building. You may wonder how a team of software folks ends up with an entry with a hardware component. We did too, until we thought more about the convergence happening in technology.

We were early fans of the power of voice, and we previewed a prototype of Alexa integration with Wellpepper digital treatment plans for total joint replacement at HIMSS in February 2017. Voice is a great interface for people who are mobility or vision challenged, and the design of Amazon Echo makes it an unobtrusive home device. While a mobile treatment plan is always with you, the Amazon Echo is central in the home. At one point, we thought television would be the next logical screen to support patients with their home treatment plans, but it seems like the Echo Show is going to be more powerful and still quite accessible to a large number of people.

Since our platform supports all types of patient interventions, including diabetes, this challenge was a natural fit for our team, which is made up of Wellpepper staff and Dr Soma Mandal, who joined us this spring for a rotation from the University of Georgia. However, when we brainstormed 20 possible ideas for the challenge (admittedly over beer at Fremont Brewing), the two that rose to the top involved hardware solutions in addition to voice interactions with a treatment plan. And that’s how we found ourselves with Sugarpod by Wellpepper which includes a comprehensive diabetes care plan for someone newly diagnosed, and a novel Alexa-enabled device to check for foot problems, a common complication of diabetes mellitus.

Currently in healthcare, there are some big efforts to connect device data to the EMR. While we think device data is extremely interesting, connecting it directly to the EMR is missing a key component: what’s actually happening with the patient. Having real-time device data without real-time patient experience as well, is only solving one piece of the puzzle. Patients don’t think about the devices to manage their health – whether glucometer, blood pressure monitor, or foot scanner – separately from their entire care plan. In fact, looking at both together, and understanding the interplay between their actions, and the readings from these devices, is key for patient self-management.

And that’s how we found ourselves, a mostly SaaS company, entering a challenge with a device. It’s not the first time we’ve thought about how to better integrate devices with our care plans, but is the first time we’ve gone as far as prototyping one ourselves, which got us wondering which way the market will go. It doesn’t make sense for every device to have their own corresponding app. That app is not integrated with the physician’s instructions or the rest of the patient’s care plan. It may not be feasible for every interactive treatment plan to integrate with every device, so are vertically integrated solutions the future? If you look at the bets that Google and Apple are making in this space, you might say yes. It will be fascinating to see where this Alexa challenge takes Amazon, and us too.

We’ve got a lot of work cut out for us before the final pitch on September 25th in New York. If you’re interested in our progress, subscribe to our Wellpepper newsletter, and we’ll have a few updates. If you’re interested in this overall hardware and software solution for Type 2 diabetes care, either for deploying in your organization or bringing a new device to market, please get in touch.

Read more about the process, the pitch, and how we developed the solution:

Ready When You Are: Voice Interfaces for Patient Engagement

Alexa Voice Challenge for Type 2 Diabetes: Evolving a Solution

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, patient-generated data

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Patient engagement and design in the art of medicine

Patient engagement is controversial for many physicians because it interferes with the traditional values that arise from the several hundred-year old guild of medicine. Per the NEJM Catalyst Insights Council, patient engagement is characterized as patients interested in participating in choices about their health care, taking ownership of those choices, and having an active role in improving their outcomes. Given the current epidemiology of chronic diseases, it is not surprising that many patients have low levels of engagement as well as health literacy. As someone who is preoccupied with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, it is difficult for me to view any problem solving from the patient’s lens; yet, I know through the literature and intuitively that how patients feel impacts their outcomes. The following are a few of the things I have learned and will work on as I improve my ability to deliver care:

  • Time = effectiveness Opinions of clinicians and leaders in patient care have determined that increased patient time with a health care team lends to increased engagement. A basic concept in human dynamics is that the mere exposure to someone over time is enough to start an unlikely relationship. Tack onto that high quality communication and understanding nuances of healthcare literacy, and you have a more engaged patient. In modern medicine, this would be accomplished through a multidisciplinary team effort. This task is challenging given the constraints of our current healthcare system. Could I increase time with patients through mobile technology? If there was an automated way for me or another care team provider to connect with patients via text or a quick phone call at specific intervals, I would be able to increase exposure and augment time.
  • Shared decision making is key Another finding of the NEJM Catalyst is that shared decision making is one of the most effective strategies in improving engagement. We learn about this academically through the interpretative model (as opposed to paternalistic, etc.) of provider-patient relations; but this is also just common sense. I like to think this gives patients a sense of control, a sense of choice in a matter, where frankly, a lot make be out of your control. We are also better able to accept the consequences of the decisions we make, rather than the ones that are placed upon us. One of the reasons that UNICEF has been effective in helping children around the world is from the core guiding principle that children inherently have rights. American political views are reflected in the current model of access, but I would like to practice medicine with the belief that patients have inherent rights. It is a slippery slope because patients’ actions can be counterproductive to their health – but my preference is still to protect patient autonomy.
  • Technology alone cannot solve the problem The concept of remote monitoring with wireless devices doesn’t appear to improve chronic disease management or outcomes. Technology alone cannot solve a dilemma in a people’s “business”. I would opt to use adaptive technologies that improve my relationship and sense of connectedness to the patient over technology that would offer mostly education or content to the patient. The idea of people taking ownership for a difficult problem is non-trivial. It requires motivation at a level that is primarily internal. How do you access that in people? In the self-help world, the most effective motivational coaches tend to elicit a hyper-emotional state in people along with placing a high premium on discipline. I think it’s logical to work on building a relationship, connecting, allowing a safe space for vulnerability, and witnessing the struggle to achieve begin from that foundation. While patient engagement is primarily a patient responsibility, I think providers have a responsibility to elicit patient activation as this directly affects outcomes.
  • Design-thinking can help When Indra Nooyi became the CEO of Pepsi, one of her top priorities was to explore her staff’s beliefs on the concept of design. She asked business executives to take photographs of anything that they believed constituted design. After such an abstract request, she noticed that not only did people not care to complete the assignment, that some had even hired professional photographers to complete the task. My interpretation of this story is that she believes that there is an artistic aspect in the most unsuspecting of transactions. According to IDEO, human-centered-design is about building a deep empathy with the people you are designing for. In the process of being inspired, ideating, and implementing, a design researcher explores the texture and what matters most to a person before execution of a solution. How is this any different from delivering empathetic, tailored care to a patient? What we do well in medicine, some of the time, is already done at a higher level of sophistication in the real world outside of our clinics and hospitals. While design-centric thinking may lead to innovations in healthcare, for the provider I think the greatest advantage is that you amplify the relationship you have with the patient and increase overall engagement.

Whether it’s the creation of something that didn’t exist before or making decisions that are influenced by intuition, everyone is at one level involved in artwork. Improving patient engagement particularly with design-centric thinking would bring more value and meaning to the art of medicine, a skill I look forward to building throughout my career.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement

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Exposure at a digital health startup

Physicians typically endure years of training by being put in a pressure cooker with no safety valve. They persist through sheer brute force and discipline within a highly regulated, high barrier to entry industry. The high stakes culture of medicine often lends to emotional immaturity and an inability to relate to most of the world around. Ironic and sad, given that one of the core principles in patient care is to demonstrate empathy towards the human condition. The information asymmetry that exists between patient and provider further puts more onus on the physician to have character and compassion. In addition to being out of touch with reality, physicians also grapple with the changing times. Technological advancements and accessibility of information through technology has influenced the way physicians learn and practice medicine. Physicians who are uncomfortable with technology tend to find it harder to keep up with the latest innovations and research that affects patient care.

I chose to do a rotation at a digital health startup because of the fear of being disconnected and clueless. Plus there are a few other beliefs of mine that I wanted to more fully explore during my time at Wellpepper:

  • Understanding patients in the aggregate is important. Understanding what patients want, feel, and expect is not just an interesting data set, but is essential for me in providing optimal care. While a physician still deals with a patient one on one and the experience is influenced by patient characteristics, knowing the context in where the patient is coming from provides the best chance for an optimal encounter.
  • Technology that enhances the patient-physician relationship is a top priority. The physicians I have respected the most have tier 1 communication skills and relationships with their patients. A good relationship can literally bend the physics of the situation (e.g. that’s why doctors who have good bedside manner don’t get sued).
  • Technology that promotes value based care is the current landscape. It is no longer around the corner. Every stakeholder in healthcare is interested in improvement of care from an outcomes and cost perspective. Current practices in medicine are rapidly adapting in order to keep up.
  • Betting against yourself is a great strategy for growth. Based on the culture of medicine, it has always been more important for me to implement care that is standardized and in service of saving a patient’s life rather than considering how he/she feels. Something as simple as a patient having to give five histories within the same hospital admission is normal to me and also has value due to the difficulties in eliciting accurate information. But what if I considered that a patient doesn’t want to hear the same question repeatedly and that ultimately effects his/her perception of care? What if their lives were saved but they didn’t believe that anyone truly cared for them in the hospitalization? Would this be a meaningful experience, or a shallow one sided win? Challenging the way I think, the way I was indoctrinated into thinking and behaving, is something I look forward to in this process.

In summary, I chose to do a rotation at Wellpepper because I have a growth mindset. I want to consciously be a part of the most exciting time in medicine, where the hard work of innovative and creative minds improve patient lives.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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T2 Telehealth aka ATA 2017 aka ATA 23: Part 1, The Eye of the Hurricane

While there is a focus on transformation, value, and outcomes going on, if the keynotes are any indication it may be a rough road ahead for telemedicine.

“It’s the 23rd year for the American Telemedicine Association conference, why are we still talking about how to get paid?”, admonished Pamela Peele, PhD economist and Chief Analytics Officer of UPMC during the opening keynote of the annual conference of the American Telemedicine Association.

Pamela Peele at ATA2017

Pamela Peele at ATA2017

“Especially since, as this audience knows, telemedicine is the best thing since sliced bread?

Why indeed? Well, it’s complicated. The problem is that each person in the value chain, the payer, the physician, the healthcare organization, the patient, and the patient’s closest adult daughter (aka primary caregiver), only see the value of one slice of that loaf of bread, and we collectively as purveyors of telemedicine have to sell the entire loaf. There’s no clear solution to this problem. However, with unsustainable costs of healthcare, and increasing consumerization we have got to figure it out. The taxpayer is bearing the brunt of the costs right now, and Peele characterized the shift of baby boomers to skilled nursing facilities as a hurricane we are unprepared for. One way out is to keep people at home, and for that we need Medicare to fund a cross-state multi-facility study to determine efficacy, value, and best practices. Fragmentation of trials is keeping us from wide scale adoption.

The Adaptation Curve

The Adaptation Curve

“We have got to figure it out” was also the theme of best-selling author and New York Times columnist Tom Friedman’s keynote promoting his new book “Thank-You For Being Late.” Friedman claimed to be more right than the rightest Republican and suggested abolishing corporate taxes and at the same time more left than the leftist Bernie Sander’s supporter suggesting we need an adaptable safety net. His major thesis is that we are undergoing 3 climate changes right now: globalization, climate, and technological. To survive and thrive in this new world, we need to adapt and evolve, and take our cues from Mother Nature, not from some sort of top-down regulation. Like Peele on the previous day, Friedman also sees a hurricane coming and suggests that the only way to survive is to find the eye of the storm not by building a wall.

Adapting and evolving will come in handy with the harder times for healthcare investment ahead predicted by the venture investing panel in the day 3 keynote. Tom Rodgers of McKesson Ventures, and Rob Coppedge of the newly formed Echo Health Ventures pulled no punches, as they tossed of tweet worthy statements like “Don’t tell me you’re the SnapChat of healthcare” and “it seems like there are only 3 business models for telemedicine.” The later was Coppedge’s comment on walking the tradeshow floor. (The models are direct to consumer, platform, and as a combined technology and service.) Rodgers had no love for direct to consumer models or anything that targeted millennials who he deemed low and inconsistent users of services. Platform vendors were advised to surround themselves with services: video was seen as a commodity.

So where does that leave us? Value, value, value. The challenge is that the value is different depending on the intervention, the patient, the payer, and the provider. Preventing readmissions, aging at home, decreasing travel costs, all provide benefits to one or more of the key stake holders. Can we figure out how to reimburse based on slices of value? How do we get together to realize that value? And how do we do it before the hurricane hits?

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare transformation, Telemedicine

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Telehealth 2.0: Our picks for Orlando

File-2016-3478-2017_ATATradeshow_1920_25I am really looking forward to heading to Orlando for the American Telemedicine Conference, aka Telehealth 2.0. Seattle has been under a rain cloud this entire year, and I want to see the sun. I’m also looking forward to sharing our findings in using asynchronous mobile telehealth for remote rehabilitation with patients recovering from total joint replacement. I’ll be speaking with our colleagues from Hartford Health, Reflexion, and Miami Children’s Hospital on Sunday during the first breakout sessions. Hope to see you there!

In addition to the topics about legislation and regulations, it’s great to see these sessions on value, quality, and new treatment models. Here are some of Wellpepper’s picks for the conference.

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Now with all this great content, networking and a talk to prepare, when will I see the sun?

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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The Disneyfication or Consumerization of Healthcare

I had the privilege of participating in my second panel hosted by Curtis Kopf, Senior VP of Customer Experience at Premera, at the recent Washington State of Reform Health Policy Conference. Curtis was formerly of Alaska Airlines and is new enough to healthcare to be able to point out idiosyncrasies of healthcare, and he led the audience, my fellow panelists, Elizabeth Fleming, VP of Group Health Cooperative, Tabitha Dunn, VP of Customer Experience at Concur, and me on a rollicking discussion of who excels in customer service, how to emulate consumer organizations, and how not to emulate consumer organizations.

I enjoy panels as they afford the opportunity to evaluate my own perspective based on the insights of others usually in extremely different roles. This panel was unique as we represented payer, provider, employer, and digital health/technology: practically a cross-section of the industry.

Both over coffee prior to the panel and on the panel, we talked a lot about the influence and guiding principles of Disney as the quintessential consumer experience focused organization. Tabitha had just returned from a holiday trip with her family, and Curtis had the opportunity to attend the Disney Institute for customer service training during his time at Alaska airlines.

Before getting into the takeaways from our experiences and thinking about what to take away from Disney, we started the panel by discussing why consumerization was a topic in healthcare at all.

A number of factors have converged to drive consumer or patient-centric approach we now see in healthcare:

  • 20M newly insured people offered an opportunity that brought new players, like Walgreens, Walmart, Medical One, and Zoom+ into primary and urgent care market
  • On demand services like Uber and constant communication through messaging apps, and the ubiquity of smart phones created an expectation of healthcare on demand.
  • High-deductibles made consumers evaluate more closely how they were spending their healthcare dollars
  • Getting over the hump of initial EMR integration made physicians ask why they couldn’t have consumer-quality tools to do their jobs

Regardless of what happens with the ACA with the incoming administration, we don’t expect many of these things to change, although there may be more competition in primary care as these new players put pressure on incumbents.

How do you react when there is more competition? A customer-centric approach is a good place to start, which brings us back to Disney. As a child, I did a school project on Walt and his empire, but have to admit I didn’t know as much about them as my fellow panelists.

Here are my key takeaways from the discussion:

  • Disney is extremely consistent, which provides autonomy for their staff to make good decisions within the 4 values that Disney holds. Although you may think that the brand is the highest value, it is actually safety. A Disney cast member is allowed to break character only when safety is at risk. Consider this as you think about the healthcare experience: safety and good experience are not mutually exclusive.
  • If you’re going to try to emulate an experience from another industry, make sure you fully understand that company’s or industries core values. The that resulted when executives managed to the HCHAPS survey: Nurses were given scripts to follow rather than making decisions, which is the exact opposite of how Disney actually operates. Nurses should have been given autonomy to work within the values of the health system and the needs of the patient.
  • Disney has an entire underground operations center that supports what guests experience above ground. This supports both the safety but also the experience of the park. Curtis toured this facility while at the Disney Institute. What struck me the most about this was the realization that the hospital has no back-office. We’ve met with administrators in their offices that are converted hospital rooms. First, think how uninspiring this is for employees as an office. Second, these are usually on active hospital floors, so patients experience random water cooler conversation as they are in care.

As an outsider to healthcare, it took me a while to get used to going to the hospital to have meetings, and it still makes me uncomfortable to pass patients waiting in hospital beds in the hallway while I’m going to negotiate a contract. This lack of a “back-office” impacts patients and staff alike, and really extends to every patient interaction. The EMR is essentially back-office software. Why hospitals run their patient-facing experience from this essentially line of business technology is beyond me.

Although at Wellpepper our client is the health system, our most important user is the patient. We want to ensure that the patient experience is as good or better than any popular-patient facing applications, and represents how the patient understands their care. As a result, we are able to enable patients to participate, and self-manage, and still deliver valuable information to help the internal health system operations center be more effective, which is why I’m always happy to talk about the consumer experience in healthcare.

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, Patient Advocacy, Patient Satisfaction, Seattle

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Not Patient Engagement with Jan Oldenburg

When it comes to talking about patient engagement, nationally recognized consumer health information strategy leader Jan Oldenburg of Participatory Health Consulting chooses to delve deeper into what it means to engage patients in healthcare. With her wide range of experience, she focuses on helping organizations create and implement strategies related to patient/provider engagement and activation with a focus on digital health technology.

In this podcast, Ms. Oldenburg addresses a variety of topics ranging from shifting the healthcare mindset to utilizing digital tools to assist physicians.

Also check out more of Jan Oldenburg’s webinars: “Patient Engagement: Creating Digital Programs that Work.”

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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A CJR Primer

Recently, I had the opportunity to attend a CJR Bootcamp put on by the Healthcare Education Associates in Miami, Florida. The boot camp setting was intimate, collegial, and well targeted. With the exception of a trio of cardio folks who wanted to get ahead of their bundles, all attendees were directly responsible for implementing bundles at their health systems . The two days were jam-packed with information ranging from understanding the legislation to influencing surgeon behavior to assembling a great team to implement CJR. I recommend that if you’re on the hook for bundles in your organization that you check out this or a similar training yourself.

There is too much to recap in a single blog post, so I’ll share some high-level takeaways:

Bundles Are Complex

Even advanced organizations had gaps in their knowledge and understanding when it comes to the complexity associated with bundles. CMS continues to evolve the requirements and guidelines, causing some implementation approaches to have to rely on predicting what’s going to stick.

For example, the original PRO guidelines were for HOOS and KOOS, which have now been changed to HOOSJR and KOOSJR. If you’re concerned about requirements changing, consider adopting requirements that will benefit you even if they change. Organizations that started tracking HOOS and KOOS have a leg (or knee or hip) up because they have historical outcome data and have hopefully streamlined their processes.

Bundles Require Multi-Disciplinary and Multi-Organizational Teams

Within an organization, you’ll need a multi-disciplinary team that includes clinical, administrative, operational and finance, technology, procurement and so on. You’ll also require an executive sponsor who will make sure senior leadership is aware of and supporting your initiative.

A recommended working group looks like this:

  1. Executive Sponsor(s)
  2. Physician Lead
  3. Project Manager(s)
  4. Care Navigator/Care Coordination Lead
  5. HER/IT Lead
  6. Data Analytics & Quality Leads
  7. Compliance Lead
  8. Legal Lead
  9. Communications Lead
  10. Gainsharing Program Support

You’ll need to be skilled in both project management as well as the ability to influence change. Consider all the stakeholders that need to be influenced – who are the best people to influence them and how?

Think about the rhythm of communication to different stakeholders. Too much and you overwhelm. Too little and people aren’t part of the process.

 Influencing Surgeons

One of the sessions focused on how to change behavior of surgeons. It was presented by Claudette Lajam, M.D. Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery Chief Safety Officer at NYU Langone Orthopedics, who had the task of decreasing costs for implants and improving quality by getting Langone’s to use the right selection criteria. Dr. Lajam studied behavior change theory to implement the change, but it came down to understanding surgeon behavior. She presented them with data, and encouraged competition: each surgeon was able to see in a weekly report where they stood with respect to costs and quality against everyone else in the department.

img_0095

In the new model, hospitals are responsible for gain sharing with both upstream and downstream partners where they have less influence and insight. Understanding your top performing orthopedic and skilled nursing partners is key to a successful bundle. In some areas, this risk-and-gain sharing is causing consolidation where orthopedic groups are joining hospitals.

Note that with CJR, different from BPCI, conveners are not allowed. That is, hospitals can only share risk with orthopedic groups and skilled nursing facilities. Organizations that offer to manage your program and share the risk are not allowed to participate in any gain sharing.

Bundles Need Data: But People Don’t Have It

If you need to improve outcomes and lower costs, you need to know where you’re starting from.  To know where you’re starting from, you will need lots of data so that the impact of outliers is harmonized. Not many organizations have this level of detail across their entire pathway, either from organizational challenges or challenges of the system.

Sometimes, this is from a variation of care. For example, one surgeon has most of the complex cases, or another surgeon uses a different combination of implants and auxiliary materials.

Sometimes this is from the challenges of inter-organizational communication. For example, the handoffs between hospital and skilled nursing are notoriously bad – usually with hospitals not knowing where their patients ended up and skilled nursing not knowing why they are there.

Add to this that you can’tthis on top of not being able to find out if a patient is even in the CJR bundle for a period until the CMS data comes back.

So, you’ve got a complex challenge, with large and heterogeneous teams and organizations, and a lack of data. What do you do? Give up? Of course not.

First, attend a boot camp like this one.

Then, treat every patient like they are in a bundle and work on improving outcomes.

Finally, take a look at your position, risk, and low hanging fruit. Even if you only have a few patients in the bundle today, the private payers and self-insured employers are monitoring this closely.

There is Low Hanging Fruit

There are a few areas that have been identified as opportunities to lower costs without impacting quality:

  • Inpatient rehab has been targeted, and often cut. Patients need to get moving soon after surgery, but they may not need as many sessions with a PT directly. We have patients who are following their PT care plan through Wellpepper even in an inpatient setting.
  • Standardization and optimization of implants. Often the implant companies charge separately for each component for the implant and try to upsell on items like screws. Negotiating a standardized bundle can decrease costs here, as can evaluating patients for the best joint for their situation rather than using the surgeon’s favorite. (This was the project undertaken at NYU Langone.)
  • Decreasing the length of inpatient and skilled nursing stay. Equipping patients to be more self-sufficient with joint camps, educational materials, and mobile care plans can enable them to go home faster.

You are Here

Possibly because it’s early days and people are still figuring this out, there isn’t a consistent, phased approach to rolling out the CJR bundle. In fact, you can start anywhere. Or maybe you don’t have to.

First off, make sure you’re in one of the X areas where the bundle is being rolled out. If you are, find out who else is in your region. Your cost accountability is for the average for your region. If there are big spenders in your region, you may already be delivering total joints more effectively than others and may not need to change much besides starting to collect PROs.

Also, take a look at your Medicare population for joint replacement. If it’s low, you may only have a few patients that qualify for the bundle each year – which doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t strive to improve, but it may impact the amount of effort you put in initially.

Figure out where you are today and plan your efforts accordingly. Don’t try to do everything at once and understand that both your process and the information available will continue to improve.

Good luck!

Posted in: Behavior Change, Clinical Research, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research

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Is Connected Health Entering The Mainstream?

I’m just back from Parks Associates 3rd Annual Connected Health Summit. The summit, which began with a focus on consumer health and devices, is broadening to include the consumer experience in all digital health. Most attendees were from technology, payer, and device industries rather than healthcare organizations, and I was struck that a lot of the discussion of about the data from devices, predictive analytics, and natural language processing was beyond what we’re seeing in implementation in healthcare industries today.

Evolution of Digital Health

Evolution of Digital Health

Possibly because Parks Associates focuses on consumer data, and also that the conference has been consumer-device focused in the past, attendees and presenters included telecommunications companies, and even home security companies. This was my first time at the conference but from the data presented by Parks it seems as though digital health, and consumer focused health has become accepted as inevitable and mainstream. A few examples include ADT, the home security company talking about in-home sensing to enable seniors to stay in their homes longer, and Wal-mart talking about meeting healthcare consumers where they are. All of this is a far cry from traditional healthcare delivery. There was also a belief that digital health and the digital health consumer touches everyone from seniors, to the example that for many homeless people their most prized possession is their mobile phone.

Top takeaways:

  • There is no silver bullet for mobile health, digital health, or sensors.
    • Personalization is going to be key as the drivers for engaging in health are different for each person
  • There is no digital health consumer. Segmentation is very challenging in this market. Parks Associates Research identified 4 consumer groups, and 14 segments within those groups.

Digital Health Segments

  • Technology is currently out-pacing implementation possibly due to a slower transition to value-based care than the speed of consumer technology adoption.
  • People are sometimes consumers and sometimes patients, and this is not mutually exclusive.

From Fee For Service To Value-Based Payments

I had the pleasure of participating on a panel on moving to value-based care with Dr. Alexander Grunsfeld, Chief of Neurology from our customer Sentara Healthcare, and Angie Kalousek  from Blue Cross/Blue Shield of California. Too often value gets lumped into the idea of bundles versus fee for service, instead of considering the triple aim of healthcare and delivering the best patient experience and outcomes cost effectively. Fee for service remains the stumbling block to value-based care and organizations have to straddle two worlds when considering implementing two programs. Those who can effectively cross the chasm from fee-for-service to value-based care will be the ones who succeed in the long run, and especially those who consider options before they are legislated to do so.

Crossing the chasm from fee for service to value-based payments

Crossing the chasm from fee for service to value-based payments

Our headache management project with Sentara started from the need of one neurologist to manage his caseload. He had too many patients and not enough data, and needed a way to identify patients that needed the most help and also to enable patients to self-manage their headaches. Interestingly, though although the problem that he was trying to solve was focused on access, in a fee-for-service world, initial appointments are compensated at a higher rate that follow on appointments, so decreasing the need for follow on appointments could actually increase revenue. In an exact opposite scenario, this project has caught the attention of those in Sentara’s health plan, Optima, and they are looking to use this patient self-management to decrease ER costs by enabling patients to better self-manage.

Audience poll on in-home care

Audience poll on in-home care

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement

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Taking the Fear Out of Total Joint Replacement

I’m not quite ready for a joint replacement but many of our Wellpepper users are, so I found myself spending a recent Saturday morning at a session called “Taking The Fear Out of Total Joint Replacement.” This patient-focused half-day workshop was free to potential patients and sponsored by an organization called SwiftPath that specializes in minimally invasive outpatient total joint procedures. Total joint procedures are feeling the crunch of reimbursement changes in the Affordable Care Act, and one way to lower costs is to perform them in an outpatient facility. However, due to the minimized time an outpatient candidate would spend under the supervision of a doctor, they must be highly engaged in their self-care efforts, including losing weight or quitting smoking if necessary. With people having replacements at younger ages, and often having both knees and hips replaced, the need for engaged patients continues to grow.

I attended the workshop to get an idea of the patient’s perspective on the information and on the procedure. Health systems frequently offer Total Joint Bootcamp but this was intended as an introductory session for people who may be undecided about getting a replacement. The sessions included information about good candidates for minimally invasive total joint replacement, expectations of patients and their caregivers for participation, learning, and recovery, and an overview of the physical therapy involved. The host for the day was Dr. Craig McAllister who is one of the principals of the SwiftPath method. With the exception of the initial opening sequence of surgeons talking about the effictiveness of the methodology, the day was primarily patient focused, starting with risk stratification as a means to determining the best candidates for surgery, through tracking patient reported outcomes, and ensuring patients and caregivers were equal participants in care. There was also a session on determining how a patient pays. Dr. McAllister noted at one point that this entire patient-centered approach was completely different than what he was taught in medical school.

Two of the most powerful sessions were also patient-focused. The first was a patient panel consisting of an OR nurse who had a recent knee replacement and biked to the session, a few people who had experienced both in-patient and outpatient replacements, and one who was not originally a candidate for surgery because he was a smoker. While quitting is a requirement for the surgery, he initially didn’t want to until he realized that he would lose his opportunity to have Dr. McAllister perform the surgery, concluding that he needed the surgeon more than the surgeon needed him: “If I didn’t do what he said, the next patient in line would.” I thought this was a really interesting approach to motivating change: be inspiring and selective, not punitive or even threatening. All of the participants talked about having low pain levels, and some not using the prescribed opiates. As part of the program, Dr. McAllister closely tracked their post-surgical pain, nausea, and opiate usage. One patient disclosed that he drove himself to his first post-surgery physical therapy appointment, and although this was not encouraged, his PT actually gave him the all-clear to drive home.

The final session of the day was possibly the most striking. It featured a police officer and the founder of a drug addiction non-profit, Amber’s Hope talking about opiate addiction. This session was sobering, both from the impact of the drugs but also because measures to control these dangerous substances have actually exacerbated the problem. Since opiates cannot be prescribed by phone, and post-surgery patients are not mobile enough to visit a physician, get a prescription, and take it to a pharmacy, physicians need to prescribe what they believe will be enough pills prior to surgery, which can lead to leftover pills. Most non-prescribed usage of opiates comes from these leftover pills, which means that educating patients on how to dispose of them is key. In Kirkland, Washington where this session took place, for example, the only way to dispose of them is to take them to the local police station. (FDA recommendations for disposal of prescription drugs can be found here.) At Wellpepper, we track the use of both over-the-counter and prescribed painkillers as part of treatment plans. We do this for two reasons: first, it’s a valuable piece of information about a patient’s pain levels and recovery time, and second, too often these pills are prescribed as needed and usage isn’t monitored, leading to a nationwide opiate problem.

I attended this event so I could better understand the people who will eventually use our software. I learned a lot more about changes in care delivery, and got some great ideas for continuing to engage patients that you’ll see in future updates to our products.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Opioids, Outcomes, Patient Advocacy, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy, Seattle

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Different System, Same Challenges: Long-Term Care Perspective From Canada

Kristin Helps, our Director of Client Operations, and I had the opportunity to speak about delivering Empathetic Care for Seniors Through Technology at the annual BC Caregiver’s Association Conference in Whistler, BC. The BCCPA is the representative body for long-term care, skilled nursing, homecare and retirement facilities in the province of British Columbia in Canada. These types of facilities are mostly privately run, by both for-profit, and charity organizations, as opposed to acute care which is run by provincial and regional authorities. While this was a BC organization and conference, delegates came from across the country, and ranged from individual home care works, to facility owners, to university professors and researchers.

For the most part we heard similar challenges to those encountered in the health system in the US:

  • Communication between care settings
  • The struggle to deliver patient-centered care
  • Decreasing reimbursement for homecare
  • Enabling staff to operate at the top of their license

At the same time, people expressed a desire to age in place, and the health system wanted to be able to support this. While 80% of Canadians cited wanting to die at home, only 40% actually do.

One of the big differences we noted at this conference was that speakers and participants were calling on the Federal government to step in and fix many of the problems in a way that we don’t often see in the US. Another difference was that participants were looking globally for solutions to challenges, particularly in dementia care.

Looking Globally for Dementia Care

This was our first time at this conference and veterans told us that the previous year was quite focused on analytics, while this year the focus was on dementia care. While not primarily our area of expertise at Wellpepper, we heard about a number of innovative initiatives to improve care, including a novel approach by the government of Japan. Japan decided to characterize dementia as a social problem rather than a medical problem and trained bank tellers and grocery store clerks to recognize the signs of dementia. It was thought that these people were most likely to see problems, for example if someone was unable to understand how to pay bills or buy groceries. Considering that many with early onset dementia are quite successful at hiding changes from their loved ones, this idea is quite interesting. It also puts the responsibility for care back into society rather than relying on medical facilities that often distance the rest of us from the challenges of aging.

Basketball courts at Aegis Living Seattle

Basketball courts at Aegis Living Seattle

The Butterfly Household Model of Care, which was initiated in the UK, but has been implemented in Alberta with some success, is another novel idea. People with dementia often don’t know what day it is or what they had for lunch, but they do have vivid internal experiences, often remembering happier times of their lives. Butterfly Households are designed to stimulate people with dementia with bright colors, and also to stimulate memories with areas designed to invoke feelings of the past, for example an ice cream shop or an area with old photographs. The idea in a Butterfly home is to meet patients where they are, and caregivers report much joy in delivering care and significantly fewer of the violent behaviors often associated with dementia.

While not a designated Butterfly Home, you can see some of these techniques in action at Aegis Living in Capitol Hill, Seattle. Here are a couple of pictures from when I visited last fall. In an outdoor area they have a car and a garden shed designed to stimulate conversation and fond memories, and an old-gym styled basketball court, where you can shoot hoops sitting down.

Invoking memories at Aegis Living Seattle

Invoking memories at Aegis Living Seattle

To find out more about the topics in this post:

Bank Tellers Act Serve as Caregivers in Aging Japan

BC Caregivers Association

Butterfly Household Model of Care

Aegis Living Capitol Hill Seattle

If you’re interested in learning more about our talk on delivering empathy through technology, contact us.

Posted in: Aging, Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation, Managing Chronic Disease, Seattle, Uncategorized

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Every Patient Has a Story

I have just returned from my first Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 (PX2016), and I’m inspired. At Wellpepper, we are focused on empowering the patient to feel ownership and accountability to participate in their healthcare journey. The Beryl Institute and their members are doing the same and it was great to connect with so many like-minded people. The PX2016 conference is just one way they bring together this community.

PX2016 is 6 years young and attended by mostly caregivers, nurses, doctors, regular people who were touched by a personal health experience and now are in the field, and patients. With only 1000 attendees, it’s possible to form relationships. There was lots of hugging, sharing, pictures and overall excitement to be in Dallas. I met several newbies and like me, they were inspired too.

The conference opened up with a real life patient story. Les, a heart attack survivor, told his story of how he was participating in a sculling exercise and went into cardiac arrest in the middle of the water. The following chain of events happened that allowed him to be standing in front of us to tell his story. A retired nurse was on board and jumped into action to do CPR (she was filling in for her friend who couldn’t make it), the bowman had his cell phone to call 911 (typically he doesn’t bring it on the boat), another rower in his own boat happened to be near the dock gate and had a key to unlock the gate (usually locked because it was 5:30AM) which allowed the paramedics to get to Les. If there was one break in that chain, Les would not be with us. He went on to share his experience about his care at UCLA Medical Center and how every touch point from the people on the boat, to paramedics, to the care team made a difference in his recovery. By this time, there was not a dry eye in the place. It was all about why we in this profession of healthcare really do want to make a difference in the patient experience.

This lead to the theme that every patient has a story. From the other keynotes to the sessions I attended, this theme was pervasive. The focus of PX 2016 is to share stories, best practices and ideas on how to bring together interactions, culture and perceptions across the continuum of care.

In the session, Removing Complexity from the Post-Acute Care Patient (one of our passions at Wellpepper), it became clear that the long term care model needs to be reinvented for simplicity. True simplicity comes from matching the patient’s experience with the patient’s expectations. As an example, The New Jewish Home is renaming its post-acute rehabilitation to The Rapid Recovering Center which supports setting a different tone for the patient and ultimately in their experience. When a patient is sent to a post-acute rehabilitation center it can suggest a long and difficult recovery. But, naming it the Rapid Recovery Center aligns with the patient’s expectation of wanting to get better as soon as possible.

Another session that hit close to Wellpepper’s core values was how University of Chicago puts family and patients first in their patient experience strategy. Enhancing Patient Experience and Engagement through Technology Innovation by Sue Murphy, RN, Executive Director- Patient Experience and Engagement Program and Dr. Alison Tothy, Associate CMO – Patient Experience and Engagement Program at University of Chicago suggest the ability to capture real-time opportunities for engaging patients in their care and in their service expectations with innovative technology and techniques can lead to overall happier patients. Such technologies like rounding, discharge call centers and interactive patient care have led to substantial outcome improvements. However, just implementing technology did not solve the patient experience challenge. A culture shift in the staff was required which inspired them focus on individualized care for each patient. Combining a culture shift with innovative technology has allowed the University of Chicago to increase patient satisfaction scores, reduce readmission rates and improve outcomes. Furthermore, leadership is engaged and excited about the power of technology to improve the patient experience.

To bring it to a close, we were inspired by another personal patient story from Kelly Corrigan. She is a New York Times best-selling author who shares her most personal stories, including her health challenges. She has had more than her share of health encounters between herself and her family. She read an excerpt from her book, The Middle Place, where her and her Dad where both diagnosed with cancer in the same year. It was a compassionate and funny rendition of when she just starting her chemotherapy sessions and her Dad came across country for support. She talked about how in the middle of crisis, magnificent can happen. She was amazed to witness how all the people around her, including herself, able to conform into the new reality – cancer. Although a happy ending for her, not so much for her father. He passed away last year. She emphasized how at the end of her father’s journey, she made a point to thank all the caregivers for they really did make a difference in a very difficult time. Then looking out at all of us in the audience at that moment, almost with a tone of authority, she challenged us to hold on to the feelings of why we went into healthcare.

For some of us, it was a personal experience. For others, it was the opportunity to make a difference. Regardless, as Kelly so eloquently put it, people want to feel as if they have been felt and be a good listener because every patient has a story.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare transformation, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Flexible Care for Independent Aging: Don’t Dumb It Down!

I had the pleasure of participating on a panel on technology for aging, along with Honor founder Seth Sternberg and CareTicker founder Chiara Bell during the HX360 event at HIMSS 2016. (HX360 is a “conference within a conference” focused on innovation and C-suite leadership.) The panel was hosted by Jeff Makowka, Director of Market Innovation for AARP, and ranged from topics on entrepreneurship and whether there is a venture rush to technology for aging now to approaches for delivering care for aging in place.

Interestingly, all three panelists were inspired by personal experiences to found our companies. For me, it was poor discharge instructions and lack of continuity of care when my mom was released from 6 months in a long-term care facility. For Seth and Chiara, it was trying to figure out how to enable their parents to age at home. It’s a classic entrepreneurial model to experience a problem and try to find a solution to it, provided the market is big enough, and this market certainly is based only on demographics of the aging baby boomers. Seth and I both made the leap from technology, Seth from Google, and me from Microsoft, and Chiara from a long history in healthcare and homecare.

We were much sharper in real life.

We were much sharper in real life.

Honor’s $20M in funding lead by Andressen Horowitz is proof that Silicon Valley is paying attention to homecare, which can be viewed as important from two aspects: first we need innovative and new thinking to approach these challenges, and second these solutions could require a lot of money. (Although I would posit that we need patient capital in this space, something that Silicon Valley is not always known for. Interestingly, the same week as the panel Dave Chase and Andrey Ostrovsky posted a piece on why Silicon Valley does not belong in homecare. Maybe they should be on next year’s panel.)

The three panelist companies took similar approaches in using technology to scale and empower the people in the process, both patients and caregivers. For Wellpepper it’s about empowering the patient to follow their care plans and get remote support from the healthcare team. Honor and Careticker are more focused on the patient and their homecare team, whether that is professionals or family members. What was similar in the approach was providing information in real-time to the people who need it, and treating everyone in the process with respect. Honor does this by ensuring homecare workers are paid a living wage. Careticker does this by recognizing for people to age in place, the family caregivers need the right information and supports and Wellpepper does this with patient-centered and highly-usable software that is not dumbed down for the aging.

We were perhaps the outlier on this panel as our solution is not aimed specifically at the elderly. However, you could say we are the most representative of the way we need to approach the challenge: we need solutions that are designed with empathy, putting the patient first, and are not categorizing people into “young” and “old.” Well designed solutions and products should can address a broad spectrum of users, and we need to treat those aging in our population as another audience in this spectrum.

Posted in: Aging, Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, Patient Satisfaction

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You Could Get Well Here: Touring Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Center for InnovationDuring the recent Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Transform Conference, attendees had the opportunity to take tours of various Mayo facilities.

I was able to tour the Center For Innovation, where we will be working periodically over the next year as part of our prize for winning the Mayo and Avia Think Big Innovation challenge, and the Center for Healthy Living. A third tour, of the new Well Living Lab was sold out before we could get tickets.

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

Spirituality is part of health at Mayo

The Well Living Lab is a research center where the health impacts of daily living can be tested. For example, researchers expect to study the impacts of air quality or lighting in office buildings on employee health. Tour organizers told me that the paint was still drying on the center as they start the tours so I’m sure we’ll be hearing more about this innovative center in the future.

Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Tour

The Center For Innovation houses two main areas, one a clinical space where real patients and care teams can test different types of exam room configurations and equipment, and the other more like a typical software or design office. Pictures were limited in this area, so you’ll have to imagine from my descriptions.

All the walls in the clinical space are magnetic, enabling different types of room configurations on the fly. Even the artwork is affixed with magnets, so I suppose it’s possible to also test the effect of different artists as well. When medical teams work out of the CFI space, they are testing not just the patient experience but whether these new configurations make teams more productive or collaborative. The CFI has found a number of improvements to care are possible with better room configuration, and noted that clinics and exam rooms have changed very little since the 1950s.Human Centered Design

A few innovative examples include:

  • A kidney-shaped table encourages more collaboration and communication between doctors and patients
  • Separate consultation and exam rooms offer many benefits in both communication and efficiency. Patients are less stressed, more able to absorb information, and ask questions in a consultation room rather than sitting on a table in an exam room. Two physicians can share one exam room when there are two consultation rooms and therefore they can see more patients in only 1.5 times the space of a normal exam room.
  • An open plan office where all of the care team, nurses, medical assistants, schedulers can work encourages team collaboration and also empathy as each member has much better insight into what the others are doing.
    How Patients Experience Services

    How Patients Experience Services

At the CFI, we learned about projects that have recently been completed (although they were mum on work in progress), like a project to overhaul post-discharge instructions for total joint replacement. This is a hot topic lately as CMS moves to value-based bundles for reimbursing these procedures it’s even more important to manage care outside the clinic, and do to that patients need to understand what they need to do. This is a topic near and dear to our hearts at Wellpepper.

Other projects included exer-gaming for seniors, and Project Mars named as a challenge to completely reimagining the Mayo Clinic experience as though they were building a new Mayo on Mars. This experience spans pre-visit to post visit and includes patient care and the patient’s experience in the physical space.

Mayo Clinic Center for Healthy Living

The Center for Healthy Living is an impressive new facility in the middle of Mayo campus. The Center is focused on proactive and preventative experiences for people who want to take action managing their health.

IMG_2373

Yoga studio with a view

This may include executives who believe health and fitness is a competitive business advantage to people diagnosed as pre-diabetes who are motivated not to become diabetic, to people wanting to regain health and strength after cancer treatment. The Center takes a wholistic approach, and guests (as visitors are called) frequently book a week-long package that includes physical assessment, diet, and stress and spirituality consultations.

The living wall

The living wall

Consultations on diet include cooking classes and nutritional information including how to read labels and understand what’s really in your food.

The Center also houses a spa, which is apparently a best kept secret in Rochester. Throughout the center the design is calming, including floor to ceiling windows and a living wall, and it really feels like a place you can get well.

Clients are sent home with specialized treatment programs and recommendations to support their lifestyle changes permanently. The Center has only been open for a year, and ideally will seen clients coming back year over year for a tune up. It’s definitely a place I’d visit again.

More pictures of the Center for Healthy Living.

IMG_2370

The Nutrition Pantry

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Guests learn to prepare healthy meals in this kitchen

Rest with a view

Rest with a view

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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Accountable Care and HealthIT Strategies Summit 2015: Still early days

Patients and providers both need to be empowered to deliver on the promises of the Affordable Care Act. That was the major theme and takeaway of the recent “Accountable Care and Health IT Strategies Summit” that I attended a few weeks ago in Chicago. I would add to this sentiment that IT needs help to implement technologies that empower these end-users. While not underestimating the importance of making sure technology is secure, and scalable, with too much focus on the back-end, IT can miss an opportunity to help deliver real value and change by putting tools in the hands of end-users.

Since value-based payments require health systems to be able to impact patient behavior outside their four walls, technology (and therefore IT departments) have the ability to play a greater role in helping to monitor and manage patients, and scale healthcare providers. Access to real-time data can also help identify issues and impact patient behavior before small problems turn into big ones.

While some of the stories and sessions at the conference were promising, I came away with the impression that we are still in really early days, and the leaders in this care transformation are willing to take leaps without having all the data. Considering that even with data, it still takes 17 years from innovation to transfer from research to clinical best practice, it seems that some amount of faith is required for this healthcare transformation.

In no particular order, here are a few of my notes from the 2-day conference.

Theme: Population Health 2.0: Accountable Care, Big Data and Healthcare Analytics

Population Health seems the furthest along in this transformation both in the way care is delivered and how technology supports care. Participants on this panel from Partners, Geisinger, and Hackensack University Medical Center, along with population health vendor Wellcentive debated the differences between Population Health 1.0 and 2.0. They even tried to see the future with Population Health 3.0.

Population Health 1.0 was seen as identifying risk and gaps in care, and attempting to plug those gaps. Although many organizations are still in this stage, some haven’t even gotten there yet. The panel saw themselves moving to a more evolved state of Population Health where data is used to drive better care, while responsibility for population health moves to the individual primary care physician rather than being managed in aggregate by remote care teams. However, this type of shift requires engagement by both the patients and the physicians which is still a work-in –progress.

The representative from Geisinger stressed for an effective implementation of population health, a multi-disciplinary team needs to be assembled that includes both clinical and IT. Wellcentive agreed and added that analytics need to be in the hands of end-users so they can make informed decisions.

The panel was also asked to speculate on Population Health 3.0: historical data, data driven decisions, and patient empowerment through data from sensors and surveys were all seen as key.

Honestly, my biggest takeaway from this session is that while some organizations may be claiming it’s time for Population Health 2.0, many haven’t gotten to 1.0, and no one seems to be in agreement on the definitions of each stage. Given today we already have the ability to collect survey and sensor data in the context of care, it seems like we are already have the tools for Population Health 3.0. But, we haven’t implemented the technology to address Pop Health 1.0 & 2.0 to achieve value…..so how can we even look to addressing the road to 3.0?

Theme: EMRs and Enabling Technology for ACOs

Another major theme that arose across many sessions at the conference is the limitations of current technology to support the infrastructure of new models of care. While organizations are looking for the EMR to be the Holy Grail, it’s a challenge as most EMRs are built to support older models of care, specifically around billing and reimbursement. Renown Health’s Accountable Care Organization, in Northern Nevada, will look to EPIC to solve some of their technology care needs, but realizes the need for M-health and other care coordination technologies to move up the stack, and exist separately from the EMR will be required.

Many of the participants are either trying to collect and track ACO data in the EMR or build their own systems to engage patients that fed data back into the EMR. Others acknowledged that new systems to directly engage patients need to be built on new technology stacks, although surprisingly one panelist on the Connected Care – How Trends in mHealth, Wearables and Connected Medical Home are Shaping Healthcare keynote boasted about 20-30% engagement rates with paper surveys. Yes, paper.

Theme: Engaging Patients and Providers

For ACOs and the ACA in general to be effective, the consensus at the conference was the need to enable both patients and providers. Adding individual providers into the mix seems to be a bit of a shift in thinking, and one that we’re supportive of at Wellpepper. We know that a key driver of patient adherence is the relationship between patients and providers. With our system, a good provider can influence patients to be over 85% adherent to their treatment plans. Some key ideas at the conference were providers may still need to be convinced of the need to influence patients directly, and that showing them data is the way to do that. However, the method of communication to that patient needs to connect in a way that is of their everyday life routine.

Overall, the conference presented some early wins in the shift to ACOs and value-based payments, but showed that we still have a long way to go and a lot of opportunity to improve care based on data. That said, this was the first conference I’ve been to where IT was front-and-center at the table and able to drive change if they wanted to. We have an opportunity to leapfrog old ways of doing things and implement new systems that have focus on the patient and provider, and are based on data to drive better outcomes. I for one am excited about this new opportunity and how it will change the way we deliver care in the future.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Outcomes

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