Behavior Change

Archive for Behavior Change

Simple Patient-Centered Design

At Wellpepper, we work hard to make sure our software is intuitive, including working with external academic researchers on randomized control trials for people who may have cognitive or other disabilities. This is both to make sure our software is easy-to-use for all abilities, and to overcome a frequent bias we hear about older people not being able to use applications, and also to provide valuable feedback. We’ve found from these studies, the results of which will be published shortly in peer-reviewed journals, that software can be designed for long-term adherence, and this adherence to programs can lead to clinically-meaningful patient outcome improvements.

User-centered design relies on three principles, all of which can be practiced easily, but require continual discipline to practice. It’s easy to assume you know how your users or patients will react either based on your own experiences, or based on prior knowledge. There’s really no substitute for direct experience though. When we practice user-centered design, we think about things from three aspects:

Immersion

Place ourselves in the full experience through the eyes of the user. This is possibly the most powerful way to impact user-centered design, but sometimes the most difficult. Virtual reality is proving to be a great way to experience immersion. At the Kaiser Permanente Center For Total Health in Washington, DC, participants experience a virtual reality tour by a homeless man showing where he sleeps and spends his days. It’s very powerful to be right there with him. While this is definitely a deep-dive immersion experience, there are other ways like these physical therapy students who learned what it was like to age through simple simulations like braces, and crutches. Changing the font size on your screens can be a really easy way to see whether your solution is useable by those with less than 20/20 vision. With many technology solutions being built by young teams, immersion can be a very powerful tool for usable and accessible software.

Observation

Carefully watch and examine what people are actually doing. It can be really difficult to do this without jumping in and explaining how to use your solution. An interesting way to get started with observation is to start before you start building a solution: go and visit your end-user’s environment and take notes, video, and pictures.

Understanding what is around them when they are using your solution may give you much greater insight. When possible we try to visit the clinic before a deployment of Wellpepper. Simple things like whether wifi is available, how busy the waiting room is, and who is initiating conversations with patients can help us understand how to better build administrative tools that fit into the clinician’s workflow. Once you’ve started with observing your users where they will use your solution, the next step is to have them test what you’ve built. Again, it doesn’t have to be complicated. Starting with asking them how they think they would use paper wireframes or voice interface testing with Wizard of Oz scenarios can get you early feedback before you become too attached to your creations.

Conversation

Accurately capture conversations and personal stories. The personal stories will give you insight into what’s important to your users, and also uncover things that you can’t possibly know just by looking at usage data. Conversations can help you with this. The great thing about conversations is that they are an easy way to share feedback with team members who can’t be there, and personal stories help your team converge around personas. We’ve found personal stories to be really helpful in thinking about software design, in particular understanding how to capture those personal stories from patients right in the software by letting them set and track progress against their own personal goals.

Doctor’s often talk about how becoming a patient or becoming a care-giver for a loved one changes their experiences of healthcare and makes them better doctors. This is truly user-centered design, but deeply personal experience is not the only way to learn.

To learn more:

Check out the work Bon Ku, MD is doing at Jefferson University Hospital teaching design to physicians.

Visit the Kaiser Permanente Innovation Center.

Learn about our research with Boston University and Harvard to show patient adherence and outcome improvements.

Read these books from physicians who became patients.
In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Adwish, MD
When Breath Becomes Air Paul Kalanithi, MD

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Clinical Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Research

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Voice: The most natural user interface for healthcare

There’s so much promise, and such a natural fit for voice in healthcare that unlike electronic medical records, we should not have to mandate its use. If anything, right now we are being limited by the lack of HIPAA controls rather than end-user demand. If the sessions at the recent Voice Summit, which was focused broadly on voice tech, and the upcoming Voice of Healthcare and Voice Summit at Connected Health conferences are any indication, there are many natural use cases, and a lot of pent-up demand.

With so many concerns about documentation and screens getting between patients and physicians, and the ability to deliver empathy, and to rapidly learn from interactions using natural language processing, and artificial intelligence, voice seems a natural fit and unobtrusive interface that could leapfrog traditional interfaces.

The Healthcare track at Voice Summit showed some of this promise, but also pointed out that we are still early days. Many solutions are pilots or prototypes, and I had the distinct impression that some of today’s HIPAA workarounds would not stand up to a detailed audit. Despite Alexa’s sponsorship of the conference, Google’s strong presence, and both companies push into all things healthcare, both were mum on whether or when their consumer voice devices might be HIPAA compliant. Regardless, healthcare organizations and technology vendors alike are charging forward on new scenarios for healthcare, and you can see by the diversity that if even a few of these end up being the “killer app” it’s a big opportunity.

Patient Care

Rooming: Waiting for a physician to see you in an exam room is often a wasted opportunity. A voice interface in the clinic room, could help further pinpoint why a patient is having a visit or educate pre and post visit on medical issues. Or simply having a voice assistant capture the questions that a patient has during a visit might go a long way to improving the visit.

Inpatient stay: The combination of voice assistants, wifi, and tablets could completely replace expensive and proprietary systems for inpatient patient engagement. We’re already seeing use cases for anonymous interactions with voice devices to order food, check the time, or find out the time of the next physician visit.

Long-term care: Alzheimers and dementia care are cited as the poster child for the benefits of voice in long-term care facilities. Unlike human caregivers, voice assistants never get tired of answering the same questions repeatedly. There are so many times you don’t want Saturday Night Live to predict the future, but with this one they got it right.

Patient Engagement

If we define patient engagement as interactions outside the clinic, then the opportunities today fall into three main categories triage (or eventually diagnosis), education, and self-management.

Triage Skills: Today we see some basic triage skills from organizations like Mayo Clinic, and Boston Children’s Hospital where you can check some basic first aid, or ask common questions about children’s health. While there are approximately 1,000 healthcare skills, most likely there will be a few winners or “go-to” experiences here from leading healthcare organization or trusted publishers like WebMD. (Interestingly, the presenter from WebMD was one of the more skeptical on voice experiences for patients at the Voice Summit, possibly because of the complexity of the information they present through text, video, and images on the Web.)

Health Education: Chunking content into manageable bites is currently being touted as the best practice for education material through voice. However, this is an area where the interactivity that’s possible through voice will be necessary for stickiness. If you think about the best podcasts, they use different techniques to both engage you and also impart knowledge: interviewing, verbatim quotes, sound effects, interjections, and expository material. To get engaging and sticky health education content, publishers will have to think about how to test for knowledge, advance explanations, and interact with the end-users. Since we can only remember 5 things at a time, simply chunking content is not going to be enough to make the delivery of health education through voice stick.

Reminders and Interactive Health Tasks: As we’ve seen from our testing, where voice interfaces may have the most impact for patients is in helping them complete health tasks for example, in medication adherence, simple surveys, or check-ins and reminders of basic information. Given that the voice interface is a natural in the home, checking in with a voice assistance on when to take medication, or tracking meals is an easy way to engage with a care plan. As well, cloud-based interactive voice response systems could call patients with reminders and check-ins.

Clinical Notes

Conquering the pain of charting is possibly the closest term opportunity for voice in healthcare. With every increasing workloads, and the need to capture information digitally for both care and reimbursement, the EMR has been blamed for physician burnout and lack of job satisfaction. Microsoft recently partnered with UPMC to use their Cortana voice assistant to transcribe clinical notes during a patient/provider interaction. Others attacking this space include SayKara, Robin, and incumbent, Nuance Communications. With HIPAA compliance, it’s hard not to imagine Amazon and Google looking at it as well.

Hands-free lookup

Voice really shines as an interface when your hands are not free, like driving, dentistry, or when you need to keep your hands clean. Voice is a natural in settings where touching a screen or device can cause contamination or distraction. Simplifeye is tackling this in dentistry to improve charting, and lookup of x-rays, and we expect this to infiltrate all aspects of healthcare.

You may have seen a recent article on why Alexa is not ready for healthcare primetime. With all of these great examples it’s hard to believe it. It turns out that the criticisms in this article basically highlight the current limitations of voice overall (except for HIPAA compliance of course). However, some of the challenges of discovery, context, and navigation, are why we at Wellpepper believe in not just voice, but a “Voice And” future where voice is a key interface that is helped or helps others like screens or even augmented reality. Voice is powerful, “Voice And” will be even better.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, HIPAA, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, patient-generated data, Voice

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Voice First or Voice And? Dispatches from Voice Summit

The inaugural Voice Summit was held last week in New Jersey, with the hashtag #voicefirst. At Wellpepper, we’re actually in the “Voice and” camp. We love voice interfaces for their convenience, promotion of empathy and connection, and their natural engagement. However, there are times when voice isn’t the best interface for the task or others when voice plus other interfaces are even better, which is reflected in some of our work with the Alexa Diabetes Challenge, which I spoke about at the conference.

People can only remember 5 things at a time, which is a challenge for delivery of complex instructions, education, or information through voice. Add this to the fact that voice is a “headless” navigation. That is, there are often no cues to figure out where you are going. Most of us are visual creatures, and visual cues together with voice or text often provide a richer experience. And believe it or not, the many of the sessions at this inaugural voice conference also seemed to reinforce this idea, in particular many of the consumer sessions, in addition to the healthcare sessions.

Talks by two very different consumer organizations, Comcast and Lego both showed how early we are in voice design, and how when voice is more seamless and ubiquitous we may see the promise of “voice first” but also how “voice and” is possibly the better path forward.

While when you think of giants of voice, you many immediately think of Amazon and Google, did you know that Comcast processed over 6B voice queries last year? My first thought on attending this session was that it was going to be about using interactive voice response trees before you get to a customer service agent, but Comcast has been quietly infusing voice into their entertainment experiences.

Did you know that your Comcast remote has a “voice” interface? You can talk to your TV to find programs, change the channel, or start a show. This is probably one of the best examples of “voice and.” First, voice search is actually found on a physical device. The Comcast design team had originally created a mobile app for the remote voice experience, but found that downloads were a small fraction of their entire subscriber base, so adding a “voice button” to the remote encouraged more searches. Also remember that when you use voice to search it shows you the results on your television screen. This is a “voice and” experience which wouldn’t make a lot of sense as voice standalone. Imagine searching for a movie to watch, say you’re looking for something starring Harrison Ford, and you’ve got to keep in your mind all the titles over his varied career and then choose one. First it’s a lot to remember, and second isn’t it easier to browse titles when you can see pictures and a description to jog your memory? I spoke briefly with the Comcast presenters about why they chose to put voice on the remote, versus directly in the cable box, and they said that it helped their users find the option, which was a big takeaway from the conference for me, although voice is a natural interface, the end-user still needs guidance. (A nice side benefit of the button on the remote is that it’s not always on and listening.)

Lego was another unlikely consumer company playing in the voice arena. Lego “Duplo Stories” is an Alexa skill that tells stories that children can then build using Duplo blocks. While the video was heartwarming, this session in particular highlighted both opportunities for “Voice And” using augmented reality, and also the current discovery limitations of voice.

In the video, a child playing with Duplo blocks asks his mother to start a story. The mother asks Alexa to play a Duplo story. Think about this: the skill had to be discovered and activated before any of this could take place. How would you learn about the skill without something printed on the box that the Duplo blocks came in? While it’s clever, imagine a new scenario where voice and augmented reality are built right into the blocks: a virtual Duplo minecraft. The child builds something with Duplo, and then a voice and visual interface projects the story on the child’s creation.

It’s still early days, and the potential for “Voice And” is still huge. In fact, a lot of the content at this conference reminded me of the early days of web interfaces. There was lots of talk about taxonomy of information, and “chunking” information into manageable pieces. (I used to teach a course on writing for the web, where we practiced this, which is funny as we now are so accustomed to screens that long-form journalism is making a real comeback.)

Similar to the early days of the web, there seemed to be slightly more focus on publishing than on end-user goals: what does the end-user actually want to accomplish, not what is the end-goal of the content publisher. What’s different though is that while during Web 1.0, the answer to question of whether every business needed a website, was a resounding yes, it’s not clear that everyone needs a voice skill. With 30,000 skills already available for Alexa, and new features coming online weekly, the irony is that the Alexa team sends a weekly newsletter to keep us up to date. So, even Alexa knows it’s a “Voice And” world.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Voice

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Behavioral changes with deliberate patient engagement

Based on the NEJM Catalyst survey regarding the differences between initiating and maintaining behavior change, in-person social support (followed by virtual social support) ranked the highest in sustaining long-term behavioral changes. Members of the council who participated in the survey believed that continued and consistent contact with patients influenced sustainable changes. The combination of human interaction plus digital tools reinforcing the relationship appear to be the best strategy. Even though there has been a gradual shift away from the fee-for-service culture, it still seems impractical for physicians to invest even more time into patient engagement given current constraints of the healthcare system (e.g. clinicians rarely have enough time to get through all the evidence based teaching necessary let alone focus on other factors seemingly non-clinical). Clinicians often give up motivating and influencing their patients, especially after they see marginal gains (or lack thereof) over the course of several years with patients who have chronic illnesses. You have burned out and cynical clinicians on one hand and patients who love inertia on the other. The irony is that if clinicians were to spend more time towards patient engagement, then there would be more impetus for patients to self-manage and be more accountable in their care and outcomes. Research has demonstrated that patient engagement leads to better health outcomes and reduces overall costs. Ultimately, patients being active participants in their healthcare leads to sustainable, long-term behavioral changes. In order to practice medicine effectively, efficiently, and to allow patients to extract the most out of the healthcare services they receive, clinicians should make attempts at patient engagement in a more deliberate manner with different strategies:

  • Model after other human service businesses

One of the reasons that luxury car dealerships, financial planners, and boutique firms across a range of industries are so effective with their clientele is due to their shameless persistence in engaging with their customers. They seem to be very regimented in their follow-up without it appearing overly contrived. What if clinicians could adopt that kind of style with their patients? A combination of phone calls and digital contact seems appropriate – even leaving a voicemail in the evening as follows could signal enough persistence: “I sent you an email asking you if you’ve ever been tested for Thalassemia about a week ago– I think you are iron deficient for other reasons, but I want to make sure we’re covering all our bases for your condition.  If I don’t hear from you this week, I’ll be discussing this with you at your next appointment in 2 weeks.”

  • Blend a style between a motivational coach and psychologist

Motivational coaches who are very effective typically try to leverage emotional vulnerabilities and emotional language in very explicit ways to enforce change. Psychologists tend to non-judgmentally allow clients to form conclusions by themselves. Clinicians are often balancing these two approaches to avoid both paternalism as well as the snail-paced results of motivational interviewing. Language could be blended, with elements of idealism and also allowing for patient autonomy: “The pain of discipline is nothing compared to the pain of regret. You’ve recently had a lapse, but if you stick with the diet that you initially were so good with, what do you think it will do for your diabetes? Can you imagine what life will be like?”

Clinicians are never at risk of overinvesting in communication skills, as this is necessary to strike the right balance in influencing patients over the long-run. They would benefit from practices and processes in other industries where contact is consistent and maintained over a continuum with the assistance of digital technologies.

 

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, patient engagement

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Alexa, Get Well Soon

The unofficial winner of the Super Bowl ad race this year was “Alexa Loses Her Voice”, an ad that shows celebrities subbing for Alexa when she (anthropomorphic being that she is, comes down with a cold). Both USA Today and YouTube are calling it the most watched ad.

Alexa, who won USA TODAY’s 30th Ad Meter?

“Well, um – me.”

Jeff Bezos looks skeptical that his team can replace Alexa as he should be, since their solution of Gordon Ramsay, CardiB, Rebel Wilson, and Anthony Hopkins is both extremely expensive, (Wellppper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg did the math), and breaks the key trust relationship that people have with Alexa.

Voice is a natural interface, and empathy can be quickly established by the types of utterances and engagement. By default, Alexa apologizes when she doesn’t understand something and it feels genuine. Compare that to Gordon Ramsay insulting his poor hapless user—all the guy wants is a bit of help making some comfort food. What he gets is abuse.

Or, the woman who wants Alexa’s help while she’s in her boudoir presumably getting ready for a date with her love. Instead, Anthony Hopkins insinuates that something horrific has happened to her beau possibly involving a pet peacock.

Cardi B insults a young man’s interest in Mars. Let’s hope she has not squashed his spirit of discovery and his desire to ask questions.

Since this is an all-ages blog, we won’t even mention the response Rebel Wilson gives from her bubble bath to the poor gentleman who asked Alexa to set the mood for a party. He and everyone at his party were fully traumatized.

We get it, Alexa is just better at delivering what people are asking for than real people. Especially real people with attitude like these celebrities.

As we found in our research with people with type 2 diabetes, Alexa has a natural ability that these celebrity Alexa impersonators do not. You can see it in this feedback we received from real people trying to manage Type 2 diabetes.

  • “Voice gives the feeling someone cares. Nudges you in the right direction”
  • “Instructions and voice were very calm, and clear, and easy to understand”

Voice is a natural fit to deliver empathy and care. However, since each one of these people is expecting Alexa, and has no visual indicator that anything has changed, the negative experiences will reflect on Alexa and she’ll have to win back their trust.

While the implied message of the ad spot is that Alexa does a better job of delivering on your needs than any of these celebrity experts we’re still feeling a bit traumatized by the abuse they hurled. For the sequel to this commercial, we’d expect to see Jeff firing the team that replaced Alexa with celebrities, and Alexa as a therapist working through the trust issues that her replacements created. She can do it. We believe in her.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, Voice

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The Secrets of Strong CIO and CMIO Relationships

What’s the secret of a strong CIO and CMIO relationship? Many things including the ability to be adaptable, understand organizational priorities, and deadlines, but most importantly to align on shared goals and purpose.

These were some of the takeaways from the insights shared by CIOs and CMIOs of Confluence Health, and EvergreenHealth at the annual Washington State HIMSS Executive dinner. While the conversation was split between how to foster innovation, and how to manage the demands of an EMR rollout (including the resulting backlog of other IT requests), where the relationship really shone was in the implementation of tools for a shared purpose, in this case tracking and control of opioids to help curb the epidemic we’re seeing in this country.

In particular a project at EvergreenHealth to implement e-prescribing of controlled substances, showed the need for strong CMIO and CIO collaboration. The program is designed to decrease fraud and misuse of controlled substances, but it can also improve patient care. Since it involves both technology implementation and clinical guidelines it’s a perfect example of medical and technology collaboration. In Washington State, where we’re based, the Bree Collaborative also has recommended guidelines for prescribing opioids, that while optional are widely adopted across the state.

We’ve written about this problem before in pain management for total joint replacement. Sadly, an unintended consequence of the pain management question on the HCAHPS survey, is sometimes an overprescribing of prescription pain medication. According to one speaker at the event, 30mg of oxycontin over 7 days is enough to trigger an addiction, and yet often post-surgery up to 30 days of pills are prescribed. We talked to one patient (not a Wellpepper user) who reported taking all of her prescribed pain medication, not because she needed it but because it was prescribed. The first step to solving this problem is with the prescription, and EvergreenHealth’s e-prescription program, combined with locked cabinets in the operating room (the idea is that if you don’t need it immediately, you don’t actually need it), alerts on over prescribing, and programs to substitute suboxone, coupled with behavior health management can all help. As well behavior change happens with the physicians, and a powerful image was the story of a pharmacist who put a bag of unused opioid prescriptions on the table to show that even if they didn’t think so, some physicians may have been over-prescribing.

However there are ways to take it a step further: tracking what the patient actually took outside the clinic, which is why we include a pain medication usage task in many care plans. This activity asks patients some simple questions about their over-the-counter and prescribed pain medication usage, and alerts if the numbers or the length of time is over certain thresholds. It’s in use in care plans that include general pain management, surgical, and neurology (headache management), and provides a view into usage, and the opportunity to reach out and help patients outside the clinic before usage becomes a problem.

We’re strong believers in the ability for patients to record their own outcomes and experiences, and the value of combining this with prescribing and clinical data to close the loop on delivering better care. If you’re interested in learning more, get in touch.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare Legislation, HIPAA, Opioids, Outcomes, patient engagement

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Your Cupcakes Are Not My Goals

This year Google Maps tried out a short-lived motivational technique of showing how many cupcakes you would burn off or ostensibly could eat if you chose to walk to your destination. Not surprisingly this backfired, and they quickly retracted the feature. The reasons ranged from users expressing feelings of shame for not walking, to those with eating disorders saying it would encourage more obsessive behavior. Beyond that, many questioned how Google was even calculating both caloric expenditure and the actual calories in the cupcakes.

Regardless of the myriad of criticisms the experiment illustrated a key point: motivation and goal setting is best left to the individual, and understanding someone’s personal context is extremely important if you want to help them set goals.

One of our most read blog posts of 2017 was a 2015 post on whether setting SMART or MEANINGFUL goals was most effective for patients. I’m not sure why this bubbled to the top this year but the post provides an overview of two thoughtful frameworks for helping patients set goals.

At Wellpepper, we’d like to propose a third methodology: let people figure out what’s important to them. This year we expanded a capability we’ve had since V.1 that enables patients to set their own goals. This is a free-form, 140 character text box where patients write about what’s important to them. Over the years, we’ve had some clinicians express concern about whether patients could set their own goals. Functional goals are best left to the experts, but these are life goals, things that are important to people and why they are even bothering to use this app which helps them through healthcare activities to manage chronic diseases or recover from acute events.

Since we already knew that setting patient-generated goals is motivating, we also got to wondering whether you could track progress in a generic way based on patient-generated goals. After analyzing thousands of patient-generated goals, we figured out that asking a question about the patient’s perception progress on a Likert scale would work, and so this year we expanded the patient goal task type to include tracking.

It looks like this.

In case you’re skeptical that this works, here are a few examples of patient-generated goals.

Spend more time with family.

Get outside more frequently.

Walk more.

Be ready for vacation.

Now ask the question. See, it’s entirely possible for patients to set their own goals, unaided, and track progress against those goals. We’re pretty excited about the possibilities of this for improving motivation, and also for further analysis of patient adherence and outcomes. If you’d like to know more, or see a demo, we’d love to hear from you.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, patient-generated data

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May You Live In Interesting Times: Wellpepper’s Most Interesting Blog Posts of 2017

Who would have predicted 2017? As soon as the election results were in, we knew there would be trouble for the Affordable Care Act no one could have predicted the path through repeal with no replacement to claw backs in a tax bill that no one has read. It’s been a crazy ride in healthcare and otherwise. As we look ahead to 2018, we’ve found that a good place to start is by looking back at what was popular in 2017.

Looking back over the past year’s top blog posts, we also believe trends that started in 2017, but will even stronger in 2018. These four themes bubbled up to the top in our most-read blog posts of 2017:

Shift to the cloud

We’ve noticed a much wider spread acceptance of cloud technologies in healthcare, and the big cloud platform vendors have definitely taken an interest in the space. Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg’s comprehensive primer on using AWS with HIPAA protected data was one of our most read posts. Since he wrote it, even more AWS services have become HIPAA-eligible.

Using AWS with HIPAA-Protected Data – A Practical Primer

Consumerization of healthcare

Consumer expectations for efficient online interactions have been driven by high-deductible plans and an expectation from consumer technology and industries like retail and banking that customer service should be personalized, interactive, and real-time. These two posts about the consumerization of healthcare were among the most popular.

The Disneyfication or Consumerization of Healthcare

Consumerization Is Not A Bad Word

Value of patient-generated data

In 2017 we saw a real acceptance of patient-generated data. Our customers started asking about putting certain data in the EMR, and our analysis of the data we collect showed interesting trends in patient adherence and predictors of readmission. This was reflected in the large readership of these two blog posts focused on the clinical and business value of collecting and analyzing patient-generated data.

In Defense of Patient-Generated Data

Realizing Value In Patient Engagement

Power of voice technology

Voice technology definitely had a moment this year. Okay Google, and Alexa were asked to play music, turn on lights, and more importantly questions about healthcare. As winners of the Alexa Diabetes Challenge, we saw the power of voice firsthand when testing voice with people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The emotional connection to voice is stronger than mobile, and it’s such a natural interaction in people-powered healthcare. Our blog posts on the Alexa Diabetes Challenge, and developing a voice solution were definitely in the top 10 most read.

Introducing Sugarpod by Wellpepper, a comprehensive diabetes care plan

Building a Voice Experience for People with Type 2 Diabetes

Ready When You Are: Voice Interfaces for Patient Engagement

Since these themes are still evolving we think 2018 will present a shift from investigation to action, from consideration to deployment and possibly insights. Machine-learning and AI will probably remain high in the hype cycle, and certainly the trends of horizontal and vertical healthcare mergers will continue. We also expect a big move from one of the large technology companies who have all been increasing their focus in healthcare, which in turn will accelerate the shift to a consumer-focus in healthcare.

There’s a saying “may you live in interesting times.” We expect 2018 to be at least as interesting as 2017. Onwards!

Note: There was one additional post that hit the most popular list. Interestingly, it was a post from 2014 on whether SMART or MEANINGFUL goals are better for patients. We’re not sure why it resurfaced, but based on analysis we’ve done of patient-directed goals, we think there’s a third approach.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, HIPAA, patient engagement, patient-generated data, Voice

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Are Women Better Surgeons? Patient-Generated Data Knows The Answer

As empowerers of patients and collectors of patient-generated data, we’re pretty bullish on the ability for this data to show insights. We fully admit to being biased, and view things through a lens of the patient experience and outcomes, which is why we had some ideas about a recent study that showed female surgeons had better outcomes than male surgeons.

The study, conducted on data from Ontario, Canada, was a retrospective population analysis of patients of male and female surgeons looking at rates of complications, readmissions, and death. The results of the study showed that patients of female surgeons had a small but statistically significant decrease in 30-day mortality and similar surgical outcomes.

Does this mean that women are technically better surgeons? Probably not. However, there is one sentence that stands out to a possible reason that patients of female surgeons had better outcomes.

A retrospective analysis showed no difference in outcomes by surgeon sex in patients who had emergency surgery, where patients do not usually choose their surgeon.

This would lead us to believe that there is something about the relationship between the patient and the provider that is resulting in better outcomes. We have seen this at Wellpepper, while we haven’t broken our aggregate data down by gender lines, we have seen that within the same clinic, intervention, and patient population, we see significant differences in patient engagement and outcomes between patients being seen by different providers.

Some healthcare professionals are better than others at motivating patients, and the relationship between provider and patient is key for adherence to care plans which improve outcomes. By tracking patient outcomes and adherence by provider, using patient-generated data, we are able to see insights that go beyond what a retroactive study from EMR data can show.

While our treatment plans, and continued analysis of patient outcomes against those treatment plans go much further than simply amplifying the patient-provider relationship, for example with adaptive reminders, manageable and actionable building blocks, and instant feedback, never underestimate the power of the human connection in healthcare.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, big data, Clinical Research, patient-generated data

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Ready When You Are: Voice Interfaces for Patient Engagement

We started experimenting with voice as a patient interface early this year, and showed a solution with a voice-enabled total-joint care plan to a select group of customers and partners at HIMSS 2017. Recently we were finalists in the Merck-sponsored Alexa Diabetes Challenge, where we built a voice-enabled IOT scale and diabetic foot scanner, and also a voice-powered interactive care plan.

Over the course of the challenge we tested the voice experience with people with Type 2 diabetes. We also installed the scale and scanner in a clinic, and we found that clinicians also wanted to engage with voice. Voice is a natural in the clinical setting: there’s no screen to get in the way of interactions, and people are used to answering questions. Voice is also great in the home.

However, voice isn’t always the best interface which is why we think multimodal care plans including voice, text, mobile, and web can deliver a more comprehensive solution. Since it’s easier for someone to overhear a conversation than look at your smartphone or even computer screen, mobile or web are often better interfaces depending on the person’s location (for example taking public transit), or the task they need to do (for example, reporting status of a bowel movement). We do think that voice has many great healthcare applications, and benefits for certain interactions and populations.

In our testing, we found that both patients and providers really enjoyed the voice interactions and wanted to continue the conversation. They felt very natural, and people used language that they would use with a human. For example, when asked to let the voice-powered scale know when he was ready to have his foot scan, one person responded with:

“Ready when you are.”

This natural user interface presents challenges for developers. It’s hard to model all the possible responses and utterances that a person would use. Our application, would answer to ready, sure, yes, and okay, but the “when you are” caused her some confusion.

Possibly the most important facet of voice is the connection people have with voice is extremely strong, and unlike mobile voice is not yet associated with the need to follow up, check email, or other alerts. (Notifications on voice devices could change this.)

“Voice gives the feeling someone cares. Nudges you in the right direction”

Creating a persona for voice is important, and relying on the personas created by the experts like the Alexa team, is probably the best way for beginners to start.

“Instructions and voice were very calm, and clear, and easy to understand”

Calm is the operative word here. Visual user interfaces can be described as clean, but calm is definitely a personification of the experience.

Voice is often seen as a more ubiquitous experience, possibly because using fewer words, and constantly checking for the correct meaning are best practices, for example “You want me to buy two tickets for Aladdin at 7:00 pm. Is this correct?” We often hear pushback on mobile apps for seniors, but haven’t heard the same for voice. However, during our testing, a senior who was hard-of-hearing told us she couldn’t understand Alexa, and thought that she talked too quickly. While developers can put pauses to set the speed of prompts and responses in conversation, this would mean that the same speed would have used for all users of the skill, which might be too slow for some or two fast for others. Rather than needing to build different skills based on hearing and comprehension speed it would be great if end-users could define this setting so that we can build usable interfaces for everyone.

While this was our first foray into testing voice with care plans, we see a lot of potential to drive a more emotional connection with the care plan, and to better integrate into someone’s day.

People need to manage interactions throughout their day, and integrating into the best experience based on what they need to do and where they are provides a great opportunity to do that, whether that’s voice, SMS, email, web, or mobile. While these consumer voice applications are not yet HIPAA-compliant, like our tester patient said we’ll be “ready when you are.”

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement

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What Motivates You, May Not Motivate Me

At Wellpepper our goal is to empower people to be able to follow their care plans and possibly change their behavior, so we think a lot about how to motivate people. Early on when working with Terry Ellis, Director of the Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation, wanted to make sure that our messages to patients that may struggle with adherence were positive. She works with people who have Parkinson’s disease, and stressed that while they may improve symptoms they would not “get better.”

Last week I had a similar conversation with an endocrinologist about diabetes care plans. People with chronic diseases are often overwhelmed and may take a defeatist attitude to their health. Feedback and tools need to be non-judgmental and encouraging. Ideas like “compliance” and “adherence” may not be the way to look at it. Sometimes the approach should be “something is better than nothing.” And humans, not just algorithms need to decide what “good” is.

Am I good or great?

Here’s an example, non-healthcare related of algorithmic evaluation gone wrong. Rather than applauding me for being in the top tier of energy efficient homes, the City of Seattle, says I’m merely “good.” There’s no context on my “excellent” neighbors, for example are they in a newly built home compared to my 112 year old one, and no suggestions on what I might want to do to become “excellent. (Is it the 30-year old fridge?) I’m left with a feeling of hopelessness, rather than a resolve to try to get rid of that extra 2KW. Also, what does that even mean? Is 2KW a big deal?

Now imagine you’re struggling with a chronic disease. You’ve done your best, but a poorly tuned algorithm says you’re merely good, not excellent. Well, maybe what you’ve done is your excellent. This is why we enable people to set their own goals and track progress against them, and why care plans need to be personalized for each patient. It’s also why we don’t publish stats on overall adherence. Adherence for me might be 3 out of 5 days. For someone else it might be 7 days a week. It might depend on the care plan or the person.

As part of every care plan in Wellpepper, patients can set their own goals. Sometimes clinicians worry about the patient’s ability to do this. These are not functional goals, they represent what’s important to patients, like family time or events, enjoying life, and so on. We did an analysis of thousands of these patient-entered goals, and determined that it’s possible to track progress against these goals, so we rolled out a new feature that enables patients to do this.

Patient progress against patient-defined goal

Success should be defined by the patient, and outcome goals by clinicians. Motivation and measures need to be appropriate to what the patient is being treated for and their abilities. Personalization, customization, and a patient-centered approach can achieve this. To learn more, get in touch.

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes, patient engagement, patient-generated data

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Introducing Sugarpod by Wellpepper, a comprehensive diabetes care plan

We’re both honored and excited to be one of five finalists in the Alexa Diabetes Challenge. We’re honored to be in such great company, and excited about the novel device our team is building. You may wonder how a team of software folks ends up with an entry with a hardware component. We did too, until we thought more about the convergence happening in technology.

We were early fans of the power of voice, and we previewed a prototype of Alexa integration with Wellpepper digital treatment plans for total joint replacement at HIMSS in February 2017. Voice is a great interface for people who are mobility or vision challenged, and the design of Amazon Echo makes it an unobtrusive home device. While a mobile treatment plan is always with you, the Amazon Echo is central in the home. At one point, we thought television would be the next logical screen to support patients with their home treatment plans, but it seems like the Echo Show is going to be more powerful and still quite accessible to a large number of people.

Since our platform supports all types of patient interventions, including diabetes, this challenge was a natural fit for our team, which is made up of Wellpepper staff and Dr Soma Mandal, who joined us this spring for a rotation from the University of Georgia. However, when we brainstormed 20 possible ideas for the challenge (admittedly over beer at Fremont Brewing), the two that rose to the top involved hardware solutions in addition to voice interactions with a treatment plan. And that’s how we found ourselves with Sugarpod by Wellpepper which includes a comprehensive diabetes care plan for someone newly diagnosed, and a novel Alexa-enabled device to check for foot problems, a common complication of diabetes mellitus.

Currently in healthcare, there are some big efforts to connect device data to the EMR. While we think device data is extremely interesting, connecting it directly to the EMR is missing a key component: what’s actually happening with the patient. Having real-time device data without real-time patient experience as well, is only solving one piece of the puzzle. Patients don’t think about the devices to manage their health – whether glucometer, blood pressure monitor, or foot scanner – separately from their entire care plan. In fact, looking at both together, and understanding the interplay between their actions, and the readings from these devices, is key for patient self-management.

And that’s how we found ourselves, a mostly SaaS company, entering a challenge with a device. It’s not the first time we’ve thought about how to better integrate devices with our care plans, but is the first time we’ve gone as far as prototyping one ourselves, which got us wondering which way the market will go. It doesn’t make sense for every device to have their own corresponding app. That app is not integrated with the physician’s instructions or the rest of the patient’s care plan. It may not be feasible for every interactive treatment plan to integrate with every device, so are vertically integrated solutions the future? If you look at the bets that Google and Apple are making in this space, you might say yes. It will be fascinating to see where this Alexa challenge takes Amazon, and us too.

We’ve got a lot of work cut out for us before the final pitch on September 25th in New York. If you’re interested in our progress, subscribe to our Wellpepper newsletter, and we’ll have a few updates. If you’re interested in this overall hardware and software solution for Type 2 diabetes care, either for deploying in your organization or bringing a new device to market, please get in touch.

Read more about the process, the pitch, and how we developed the solution:

Ready When You Are: Voice Interfaces for Patient Engagement

Alexa Voice Challenge for Type 2 Diabetes: Evolving a Solution

 

Posted in: Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, patient-generated data

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Patient engagement and design in the art of medicine

Patient engagement is controversial for many physicians because it interferes with the traditional values that arise from the several hundred-year old guild of medicine. Per the NEJM Catalyst Insights Council, patient engagement is characterized as patients interested in participating in choices about their health care, taking ownership of those choices, and having an active role in improving their outcomes. Given the current epidemiology of chronic diseases, it is not surprising that many patients have low levels of engagement as well as health literacy. As someone who is preoccupied with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, it is difficult for me to view any problem solving from the patient’s lens; yet, I know through the literature and intuitively that how patients feel impacts their outcomes. The following are a few of the things I have learned and will work on as I improve my ability to deliver care:

  • Time = effectiveness Opinions of clinicians and leaders in patient care have determined that increased patient time with a health care team lends to increased engagement. A basic concept in human dynamics is that the mere exposure to someone over time is enough to start an unlikely relationship. Tack onto that high quality communication and understanding nuances of healthcare literacy, and you have a more engaged patient. In modern medicine, this would be accomplished through a multidisciplinary team effort. This task is challenging given the constraints of our current healthcare system. Could I increase time with patients through mobile technology? If there was an automated way for me or another care team provider to connect with patients via text or a quick phone call at specific intervals, I would be able to increase exposure and augment time.
  • Shared decision making is key Another finding of the NEJM Catalyst is that shared decision making is one of the most effective strategies in improving engagement. We learn about this academically through the interpretative model (as opposed to paternalistic, etc.) of provider-patient relations; but this is also just common sense. I like to think this gives patients a sense of control, a sense of choice in a matter, where frankly, a lot make be out of your control. We are also better able to accept the consequences of the decisions we make, rather than the ones that are placed upon us. One of the reasons that UNICEF has been effective in helping children around the world is from the core guiding principle that children inherently have rights. American political views are reflected in the current model of access, but I would like to practice medicine with the belief that patients have inherent rights. It is a slippery slope because patients’ actions can be counterproductive to their health – but my preference is still to protect patient autonomy.
  • Technology alone cannot solve the problem The concept of remote monitoring with wireless devices doesn’t appear to improve chronic disease management or outcomes. Technology alone cannot solve a dilemma in a people’s “business”. I would opt to use adaptive technologies that improve my relationship and sense of connectedness to the patient over technology that would offer mostly education or content to the patient. The idea of people taking ownership for a difficult problem is non-trivial. It requires motivation at a level that is primarily internal. How do you access that in people? In the self-help world, the most effective motivational coaches tend to elicit a hyper-emotional state in people along with placing a high premium on discipline. I think it’s logical to work on building a relationship, connecting, allowing a safe space for vulnerability, and witnessing the struggle to achieve begin from that foundation. While patient engagement is primarily a patient responsibility, I think providers have a responsibility to elicit patient activation as this directly affects outcomes.
  • Design-thinking can help When Indra Nooyi became the CEO of Pepsi, one of her top priorities was to explore her staff’s beliefs on the concept of design. She asked business executives to take photographs of anything that they believed constituted design. After such an abstract request, she noticed that not only did people not care to complete the assignment, that some had even hired professional photographers to complete the task. My interpretation of this story is that she believes that there is an artistic aspect in the most unsuspecting of transactions. According to IDEO, human-centered-design is about building a deep empathy with the people you are designing for. In the process of being inspired, ideating, and implementing, a design researcher explores the texture and what matters most to a person before execution of a solution. How is this any different from delivering empathetic, tailored care to a patient? What we do well in medicine, some of the time, is already done at a higher level of sophistication in the real world outside of our clinics and hospitals. While design-centric thinking may lead to innovations in healthcare, for the provider I think the greatest advantage is that you amplify the relationship you have with the patient and increase overall engagement.

Whether it’s the creation of something that didn’t exist before or making decisions that are influenced by intuition, everyone is at one level involved in artwork. Improving patient engagement particularly with design-centric thinking would bring more value and meaning to the art of medicine, a skill I look forward to building throughout my career.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement

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Exposure at a digital health startup

Physicians typically endure years of training by being put in a pressure cooker with no safety valve. They persist through sheer brute force and discipline within a highly regulated, high barrier to entry industry. The high stakes culture of medicine often lends to emotional immaturity and an inability to relate to most of the world around. Ironic and sad, given that one of the core principles in patient care is to demonstrate empathy towards the human condition. The information asymmetry that exists between patient and provider further puts more onus on the physician to have character and compassion. In addition to being out of touch with reality, physicians also grapple with the changing times. Technological advancements and accessibility of information through technology has influenced the way physicians learn and practice medicine. Physicians who are uncomfortable with technology tend to find it harder to keep up with the latest innovations and research that affects patient care.

I chose to do a rotation at a digital health startup because of the fear of being disconnected and clueless. Plus there are a few other beliefs of mine that I wanted to more fully explore during my time at Wellpepper:

  • Understanding patients in the aggregate is important. Understanding what patients want, feel, and expect is not just an interesting data set, but is essential for me in providing optimal care. While a physician still deals with a patient one on one and the experience is influenced by patient characteristics, knowing the context in where the patient is coming from provides the best chance for an optimal encounter.
  • Technology that enhances the patient-physician relationship is a top priority. The physicians I have respected the most have tier 1 communication skills and relationships with their patients. A good relationship can literally bend the physics of the situation (e.g. that’s why doctors who have good bedside manner don’t get sued).
  • Technology that promotes value based care is the current landscape. It is no longer around the corner. Every stakeholder in healthcare is interested in improvement of care from an outcomes and cost perspective. Current practices in medicine are rapidly adapting in order to keep up.
  • Betting against yourself is a great strategy for growth. Based on the culture of medicine, it has always been more important for me to implement care that is standardized and in service of saving a patient’s life rather than considering how he/she feels. Something as simple as a patient having to give five histories within the same hospital admission is normal to me and also has value due to the difficulties in eliciting accurate information. But what if I considered that a patient doesn’t want to hear the same question repeatedly and that ultimately effects his/her perception of care? What if their lives were saved but they didn’t believe that anyone truly cared for them in the hospitalization? Would this be a meaningful experience, or a shallow one sided win? Challenging the way I think, the way I was indoctrinated into thinking and behaving, is something I look forward to in this process.

In summary, I chose to do a rotation at Wellpepper because I have a growth mindset. I want to consciously be a part of the most exciting time in medicine, where the hard work of innovative and creative minds improve patient lives.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction

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Home Sweet Home

Our goal at Wellpepper has always been to make sure patients have a top-notch experience with our Partners. What better experience can patients have than being in the comfort of their own home while rehabilitating from a joint replacement? An article was recently published in the New York Times that really hits home for us. Not only is in-home therapy more cost-effective than inpatient rehabilitation, but it significantly decreases the risk for adverse events.

More and more studies are showing that patients are generally happier and actually prefer being at home during their recovery from a joint replacement. A study published earlier this year in Australia found that inpatient rehabilitation did not provide an increase in mobility when compared to patients participating in a monitored home-based program.

Don’t get me wrong, inpatient rehabilitation is extremely valuable to have. In fact, we are starting to see more patients interact with their Wellpepper digital treatment plans in an inpatient setting and then continuing once discharged home.

Rehabilitation is not a one size fits all solution and much depends on a patient’s general health and attitude. The ability to be flexible and innovative in providing treatment is crucial when evaluating a patient’s needs for rehabilitation. With Wellpepper digital treatment plans, we enable health systems to bring the expertise and personalization of inpatient rehabilitation to their patient’s mobile devices, so that they may recover from their surgery in the comfort of their own homes.

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Physical Therapy

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T2 Telehealth aka ATA 2017 aka ATA 23: Part 1, The Eye of the Hurricane

While there is a focus on transformation, value, and outcomes going on, if the keynotes are any indication it may be a rough road ahead for telemedicine.

“It’s the 23rd year for the American Telemedicine Association conference, why are we still talking about how to get paid?”, admonished Pamela Peele, PhD economist and Chief Analytics Officer of UPMC during the opening keynote of the annual conference of the American Telemedicine Association.

Pamela Peele at ATA2017

Pamela Peele at ATA2017

“Especially since, as this audience knows, telemedicine is the best thing since sliced bread?

Why indeed? Well, it’s complicated. The problem is that each person in the value chain, the payer, the physician, the healthcare organization, the patient, and the patient’s closest adult daughter (aka primary caregiver), only see the value of one slice of that loaf of bread, and we collectively as purveyors of telemedicine have to sell the entire loaf. There’s no clear solution to this problem. However, with unsustainable costs of healthcare, and increasing consumerization we have got to figure it out. The taxpayer is bearing the brunt of the costs right now, and Peele characterized the shift of baby boomers to skilled nursing facilities as a hurricane we are unprepared for. One way out is to keep people at home, and for that we need Medicare to fund a cross-state multi-facility study to determine efficacy, value, and best practices. Fragmentation of trials is keeping us from wide scale adoption.

The Adaptation Curve

The Adaptation Curve

“We have got to figure it out” was also the theme of best-selling author and New York Times columnist Tom Friedman’s keynote promoting his new book “Thank-You For Being Late.” Friedman claimed to be more right than the rightest Republican and suggested abolishing corporate taxes and at the same time more left than the leftist Bernie Sander’s supporter suggesting we need an adaptable safety net. His major thesis is that we are undergoing 3 climate changes right now: globalization, climate, and technological. To survive and thrive in this new world, we need to adapt and evolve, and take our cues from Mother Nature, not from some sort of top-down regulation. Like Peele on the previous day, Friedman also sees a hurricane coming and suggests that the only way to survive is to find the eye of the storm not by building a wall.

Adapting and evolving will come in handy with the harder times for healthcare investment ahead predicted by the venture investing panel in the day 3 keynote. Tom Rodgers of McKesson Ventures, and Rob Coppedge of the newly formed Echo Health Ventures pulled no punches, as they tossed of tweet worthy statements like “Don’t tell me you’re the SnapChat of healthcare” and “it seems like there are only 3 business models for telemedicine.” The later was Coppedge’s comment on walking the tradeshow floor. (The models are direct to consumer, platform, and as a combined technology and service.) Rodgers had no love for direct to consumer models or anything that targeted millennials who he deemed low and inconsistent users of services. Platform vendors were advised to surround themselves with services: video was seen as a commodity.

So where does that leave us? Value, value, value. The challenge is that the value is different depending on the intervention, the patient, the payer, and the provider. Preventing readmissions, aging at home, decreasing travel costs, all provide benefits to one or more of the key stake holders. Can we figure out how to reimburse based on slices of value? How do we get together to realize that value? And how do we do it before the hurricane hits?

Posted in: Behavior Change, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare transformation, Telemedicine

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Telehealth 2.0: Our picks for Orlando

File-2016-3478-2017_ATATradeshow_1920_25I am really looking forward to heading to Orlando for the American Telemedicine Conference, aka Telehealth 2.0. Seattle has been under a rain cloud this entire year, and I want to see the sun. I’m also looking forward to sharing our findings in using asynchronous mobile telehealth for remote rehabilitation with patients recovering from total joint replacement. I’ll be speaking with our colleagues from Hartford Health, Reflexion, and Miami Children’s Hospital on Sunday during the first breakout sessions. Hope to see you there!

In addition to the topics about legislation and regulations, it’s great to see these sessions on value, quality, and new treatment models. Here are some of Wellpepper’s picks for the conference.

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Now with all this great content, networking and a talk to prepare, when will I see the sun?

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, patient engagement, Telemedicine

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