Adherence

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Is Connected Health Entering The Mainstream?

I’m just back from Parks Associates 3rd Annual Connected Health Summit. The summit, which began with a focus on consumer health and devices, is broadening to include the consumer experience in all digital health. Most attendees were from technology, payer, and device industries rather than healthcare organizations, and I was struck that a lot of the discussion of about the data from devices, predictive analytics, and natural language processing was beyond what we’re seeing in implementation in healthcare industries today.

Evolution of Digital Health

Evolution of Digital Health

Possibly because Parks Associates focuses on consumer data, and also that the conference has been consumer-device focused in the past, attendees and presenters included telecommunications companies, and even home security companies. This was my first time at the conference but from the data presented by Parks it seems as though digital health, and consumer focused health has become accepted as inevitable and mainstream. A few examples include ADT, the home security company talking about in-home sensing to enable seniors to stay in their homes longer, and Wal-mart talking about meeting healthcare consumers where they are. All of this is a far cry from traditional healthcare delivery. There was also a belief that digital health and the digital health consumer touches everyone from seniors, to the example that for many homeless people their most prized possession is their mobile phone.

Top takeaways:

  • There is no silver bullet for mobile health, digital health, or sensors.
    • Personalization is going to be key as the drivers for engaging in health are different for each person
  • There is no digital health consumer. Segmentation is very challenging in this market. Parks Associates Research identified 4 consumer groups, and 14 segments within those groups.

Digital Health Segments

  • Technology is currently out-pacing implementation possibly due to a slower transition to value-based care than the speed of consumer technology adoption.
  • People are sometimes consumers and sometimes patients, and this is not mutually exclusive.

From Fee For Service To Value-Based Payments

I had the pleasure of participating on a panel on moving to value-based care with Dr. Alexander Grunsfeld, Chief of Neurology from our customer Sentara Healthcare, and Angie Kalousek  from Blue Cross/Blue Shield of California. Too often value gets lumped into the idea of bundles versus fee for service, instead of considering the triple aim of healthcare and delivering the best patient experience and outcomes cost effectively. Fee for service remains the stumbling block to value-based care and organizations have to straddle two worlds when considering implementing two programs. Those who can effectively cross the chasm from fee-for-service to value-based care will be the ones who succeed in the long run, and especially those who consider options before they are legislated to do so.

Crossing the chasm from fee for service to value-based payments

Crossing the chasm from fee for service to value-based payments

Our headache management project with Sentara started from the need of one neurologist to manage his caseload. He had too many patients and not enough data, and needed a way to identify patients that needed the most help and also to enable patients to self-manage their headaches. Interestingly, though although the problem that he was trying to solve was focused on access, in a fee-for-service world, initial appointments are compensated at a higher rate that follow on appointments, so decreasing the need for follow on appointments could actually increase revenue. In an exact opposite scenario, this project has caught the attention of those in Sentara’s health plan, Optima, and they are looking to use this patient self-management to decrease ER costs by enabling patients to better self-manage.

Audience poll on in-home care

Audience poll on in-home care

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Managing Chronic Disease, patient engagement

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Cardiac rehab is effective, but patient-centered care needs to actually be patient-centered

With CMS’s new Cardiac Bundle, cardiac care (especially post-acute care), is the next service line to go under the microscope. As with total joint, variations in outcomes and costs are often seen in post-acute care so looking at how that care is delivered is key. For any bundle to be successful, engaging patients and ensuring their participation in follow up is a driver of success.

I have to admit, I haven’t read the bundle specs yet, just the news on the bundle. According to Becker’s Hospital Review’s “10 things to know about CMS’ new mandatory cardiac bundle”, the bundle includes provisions to test cardiac rehabilitation services, with 36 sessions available over 36 weeks. However, according to this article from NPR, although cardiac rehabilitation is proven to be effective, most people don’t participate. If you read through the comments on the NPR article (ignoring the trolls of course), you’ll start to see the reasons: cardiac rehabilitation care is built around the needs of the people providing the rehabilitation, not the patients.

From our experiences delivering post-acute care plans, as well as talking to payers and providers we’ve learned a few reasons why patients don’t follow up with their outpatient care:

  • Distance: In cardiac cases, patients are taken to the closest hospital, but this may not be the closest to their home or work. In other post-acute scenarios, they may have gone to a center of excellence that is also at distance.
  • Time commitment: These programs often require multiple days of treatment a week. Not everyone has the flexibility to take off work.
  • Timing: Programs are usually offered during 9 to 5, to accommodate the needs of the providers. Patients might prefer evening or weekend programs. We talked to one provider that focuses on lower income patients. People in hourly wage jobs don’t get to choose when they take breaks and their breaks are usually 15 minutes, and maybe 30 minutes for lunch. It’s next to impossible for them to attend in-person sessions.
Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News

Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News

The NPR article keyed in on these within the one example of Kathryn Shiflett (a healthcare worker herself!) whose distance and work hours (4:30 AM – 3:00 PM) pose a significant barrier: “She lives an hour away and is about to start a new job. Cardiac rehab classes happen Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, with sessions at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.”

While the bundles are definitely driving the right behavior in focusing on patient outcomes rather than procedures, they need to go further to promote patient-centered care. In this case, that should be testing new models like mobile health or community-based rehab programs that are adaptable to the unique needs of different patient groups.

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Legislation, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation, Occupational Therapy, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Rehabilitation Business, Uncategorized

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Wellpepper to attend The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference in Dallas!

I will be traveling to the great state of Texas for my first Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference next week. The Beryl Institute is a global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. They define patient experience as the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.

As a first time attendee, I am thrilled to be part of this community that is inspired to improve the patient experience. It will be a great 3 days of networking, education and sharing of ideas on how we, as a healthcare community, can make a difference in patient care.This shift to patient centered care has been coming for quite some time. Now that value-base reimbursement is starting to take shape, this conference could not be timelier. Since I will be an attendee and not an exhibitor (yea!), I will be able to get in the trenches with leaders of patient experience, quality and transformation from major health systems from across the country.

There are so many sessions that touch upon all aspects of patient experience and engagement, it’s a bit overwhelming. But, here are the sessions that peaked my interest.  Hope to see you there!

April 13, 2016
Opening Keynote: Dr. Ronan Tynan – Recording artist, physician and champion disabled athlete

Breakout Sessions I
Patent is Not a Consumer – Here’s Why
Leveraging Physician Engagement in Patient Experience Improvement Efforts
Evolving to a Patient-Centered Team-Based Culture – Engaging the Healthcare Team

April 14, 2016
Keynote Day: Cynthia Mercer – Senior Vice President & Chief Administrative Officer – Mercy Health

Breakout Sessions II
Removing Complexity from the Post-Acute Patient Experience
The Role of the Built Environment in Improving Patient Experiences and Outcomes

Lunch & Learn
“I’m There to Efficiently Help People”: How Our Busiest Clinicians Balance Productivity and Patient Experience
The Role of the Built Environment in Improving Patient Experiences and Outcomes 

April 15, 2016
Keynote: Montel Williams – Talk Show Host and MS Awareness Champion

Breakout Sessions III
Digital Engagement of Discharged ED Patients is a Must
The Impact of Cultural Diversity on Patient Experience

Breakout Sessions IV
Enhancing Patient Experience and Engagement Through Technological Innovation
The Patient Financial Experience: A Link to Satisfaction, Payment and More.
Closing Keynote: Kelly Corrigan – Author, Philanthropist and Breast Cancer Survivor

Conference program full packet can be found here

If you will be at the conference too, please contact Robin to schedule a meeting.

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare transformation, patient engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Telemedicine

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mHealth and big data will bring meaning and value to patient-reported outcomes

Anne Weiler
Wellpepper, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA
Correspondence to: Anne Weiler. CEO, Wellpepper, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA.
Email: anne@wellpepper.com
Abstract: The intersection of widespread mobile adoption, cloud computing and healthcare will enable patient-reported outcomes to be used to personalize care, draw insights and shorten the cycle from research to clinical implementation. Today, patient-reported outcomes are largely collected as part of a regulatory shift to value-based or bundled care. When patients are able to record their experiences in real-time and combine them with passive data collection from sensors and mobile devices, this information can inform better care for each patient and contribute to the growing body of health data that can be used to draw insights for all patients. This paper explores the current limitations of patient reported outcomes and how mobile health and big data analysis unlocks their potential as a valuable tool to deliver care.

Link to full article can be found here

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Telemedicine

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APTA Combined Sections Meeting Wrap Up

Walking the floor at APTA CSM 2016 Anaheim, CA

Last week, I attended the American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting (APTA CSM) in Anaheim, CA. The show was well attended by about 18,000 Physical Therapists and professionals in related roles. The packed house meant lots of energy, a few full sessions, and long lines for coffee at the two overwhelmed Starbucks kiosks in the nearby hotels. Wellpepper started out in physical rehabilitation, so it was great to be back in the company of many talented ‘movement system experts’ and associates working together to gain knowledge in order to achieve best practices for healthcare systems, patients and/or caregivers.

I attended a number of sessions, mostly focused on the shift to value-based payment, and outcome measurement. The healthcare value equation has penetrated deep in this community. I saw the same basic slide in at least 3 talks:

* This formula has been widely discussed by Michael Porter and others.

I attended two presentations on outcome measurements by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Johns Hopkins. Both organizations spoke about the task of adopting outcome measurements in an acute settingand their thoughtful deliberate steps to take research-based measurement techniques and apply them into clinical practice;BIDMC’s applied the Knowledge Translation framework, and Hopkins’ applied the Translating Knowledge Into Practice (TRIP) initiative. There were many similarities that both organizations encapsulated in their task of adopting outcome measurements; both organizations had to fight against “don’t give me more documentation work” attitudes, worked cross-functionally with PTs, nurses, physicians and administrators to gain support for their plans. And both adopted process measurements to observe the rollout of outcome measurement tools and practices. Furthermore both had some crossover in the specific measurement tools they used (e.g. AM-PAC / 6 clicks).Another common thread I believe important to note was the development of practical tips and tricks for how to make it easy to capture data into their EMRs that weren’t always designed to capture this kind of data (real nuts-and-bolts stuff like how to copy and paste boilerplate text).

Finally, armed with data on patient functional outcomes, Johns Hopkins shared some of the work they were doing on risk-stratifying patients to help control costs. In a world where Post-Acute Care costs represent one of the largest and most variable cost centers for many procedures, this is critical. The quantity and richness of this data is something I hadn’t seen presented at this conference before. Here is real objective data on how real patients progress through their care journeys that can be used to at the individual level to have an informed conversation with the patient and provides fantastic optics into the most important work product of the healthcare system: making people better.

I was struck that both presentations concluded that measuring outcomes was less of a technical feat than an organizational one. It is, as Michael Friedman a presenter from Johns Hopkins articulated, “About culture change more than anything.”

Throughout the conference, there were also mentions of Patient-Reported Outcomes (Oswestry, HOOS, KOOS were frequently mentioned – thankfully ones that Wellpepper supports!) My sense was that these are still not as widely deployed and not as consistently measured to have made their way into any of the mainstream presentations. As Wellpepper and other companies keep pushing to measure (and improve!) the patient journey with patient reported outcomes, I expect this will change in the coming years.

The one disappointment I had from the conference was that the excellent session on the Patient Experience was not better attended. Jerry Durham (a minor celebrity in the PT world!) introduced a panel of 2 patients to present on their experiences and lamented that often the Triple-Aim objectives are reduced to a Double Aim, ignoring the patient experience. So we had the excellent chance to learn and hear real patients talk. Both patients were both doing great thanks to their Physical Therapists, but both talked about the significant failings they’d seen in their medical practitioners (of all stripes). In a string of wrenching, quotable sound bites, one said “I couldn’t have gotten this bad without the help of PT”. It’s a shame that despite the healthcare rhetoric about putting patients first that more attendees didn’t put this into practice and take the opportunity to learn from some honest patient-driven conversation.

All told, this was a good conference, notable for the increasing use of patient data to measure and improve. If the attendance for CSM 2017 in San Antonio is anything like this one, let’s hope for more coffee and more chairs!

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Technology, M-health, Telemedicine

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Our Picks for APTA CSM 2016

APTA CSM 2016Wellpepper CTO Mike Van Snellenberg will be at APTA CSM in Anaheim this year, and here are a few of the sessions you might see him at. If you want to be sure to see him, book a meeting.

As usual we’re following sessions about healthcare transformation, patient experience and patient centered care, patient reported outcomes, and interventions that include technology. With the conservative care and physical therapy being an important part of new bundles like CMS’s Comprehensive Care for Total Joint Replacement, these are hot topics as well.

Here are a few session picks from Wellpepper.

Patient-Centered Care

Exercise and Diabetes: Tools for Integrating Patient-Directed Practice

The Customer Experience in Health Care: The Game Changer, Part 1

Words Mean Things: How Language Impacts Clinical Results

Acute Care Productivity Measurement, “What about the Patient?” The Time has Come to Shift to a Value Based Measurement System

Technology

Wearable Technology Meets Physical Therapy

Virtual Reality and Serious Game-Based Rehabilitation for Injured Service Members

Tracking Outcomes

Changing Behavior Through Physical Therapy: Improving Patient Outcomes

Functional Reconciliation: Implementing Outcomes Across the Continuum

Using Outcomes Data to Improve Provider, Patient and Payer Engagement and Demonstrate the Value of Your Services

Healthcare Transformation and New Models of Care

Exceptional Care and Profitability in Light of Health Care Reform for Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

The Complicated Hip: A New Debate

Emerging Issues in Medicare and Health Care Reform, Part 2

Bundled Payment Implementation for Primary Total Joint Patients

Managing Patient-Centered Care in a Changing Reimbursement World

Health System PT’s Leading the Transition to Value-Based Health Care

Posted in: Adherence, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Research, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Rehabilitation Business

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Reducing Readmissions and Costs for Total Joint Replacement

Last week CMS announced a major new initiative for Total Joint Replacement, aimed at both reducing and reconciling costs. Total joint replacements are predicted to increase at a rate of 30% to 2020. Demographics are the major driver: people are getting joint replacements at a younger age, and may have more than one in their lifetime. On the one hand, more active baby boomers have put greater strain on their joints by running marathons, and on the other an overweight population is putting more strain on their joints just by walking around.

Since the demand is increasing, and the costs fluctuate wildly, up to 100% by Medicare’s estimates, the opportunities to look for costs savings and to reward based on outcomes is key. Like other bundled payment recommendations, Medicare is looking at the 90-day readmission rates and also using a carrot and stick reimbursement approach.

“Depending on the hospital’s quality and cost performance during the episode, the hospital may receive an additional payment or be required to repay Medicare for a portion of the episode costs.”

While private payers often follow Medicare, this is one area where Medicare cites that it is following a trend that has already been piloted in private scenarios, most notably with self-insured employers contracting directly with healthcare systems on fixed-price knee and hip replacements, like the deals Walmart and Lowe’s have struck directly with hospitals.

Screen Shot 2015-07-12 at 4.00.51 PMThe American Hospital Association is also ahead of the curve on this trend, and they published some recommendations in a 2013 report entitled “Moving Towards Bundled Payment.” In it, they also noted the wide fluctuations in pricing between health systems for total joint replacement, and also that 33% of the costs of a total-joint replacement come from post-acute care.

Screen Shot 2015-07-12 at 4.01.13 PM
Our research has shown that a large driver of these costs is discharge setting related. While the majority of patients do better when discharged to home, they were being discharged to skilled nursing instead as a “belt and suspenders” type of back up. Discharging to the right setting, can improve patient experience and lower costs. However discharge to home requires the right type of patient tools. Patients need to have great educational materials, the ability to track their progress, and the ability to get remote help if they need it. This is something we’re passionate about at Wellpepper, and we are working with a number of leading health systems that are moving to bundled payments to help them digitize the pre and post surgical instructions and collect patient reported outcomes. We’d like to be part of the solution for both patients and providers as we move to these new models of care and reimbursement.

The Medicare proposal is open for public comment for the next 60 days. It’s over 400 pages long, so you may want to print a copy and take it for a little light beach reading.

 

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Health Regulations, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare transformation, Outcomes

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The Case for Patient Video in Doctors Visits: Take a Selfie and Call Me In the Morning

The selfie culture and our desire to photo-document every aspect of our lives has started to influence healthcare as well, and patients want to be able to record their doctors visits. The concept is so prevalent that it’s making headlines in the mainstream media.

Patients Press the Record Button, Making Doctors Squirm” from the Washington Post

Why You Should Record Your Doctor’s Visits” from Forbes.

Having a recording of a visit ensures that you don’t miss any information, and you can review it when you get home and are able to provide more attention to the topic. Much of what is said in a doctors visit is missed by patients, by some accounts between 40 and 80% is missed, and an additional half of that information is remembered incorrectly. As we learned during a course from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, often healthcare providers are not trained in making sure the message is received.

When we ask patients about their experiences, they tell us that they thought they understood the instructions but realized when they got home they really didn’t retain enough or understand enough to comply with the instructions. Patients are often intimidated by healthcare personnel, worried about wasting valuable visit time with questions, or worrying about how what their being told will impact their lives, for example, who will walk my dog when I have my hip replaced? Is it any wonder that the information isn’t landing?

Patient Record on Parking

Patient record in parking garage of major health system

When handout instructions are available, they are often forgotten by patients, or confusing. One healthcare organization we work with conducted an audit of all their patient handouts and discovered that they were at an 18th grade reading level. The recommended reading level for health information is fifth grade, and yet these instructions required a graduate degree!

Patients have a seemingly simple solution to this: record their doctors. Doctors on the other hand have been warned about PHI and HIPAA, so a common ‘workaround’ is to record patients on their own phones. Legal departments hate this because then the patient has a copy of their prescribed instructions but the health system does not. Liability aside, it doesn’t result in good care if everyone is not working off the same information.

Including patient video as part of a HIPAA compliant digital treatment plan is a great way to solve this problem. Patients have a better experience and the health system is able to keep good records.

Patient video can cueing or instructions that is unique to that patient, and they show the patient’s actual experience whether that’s in wound care, using a medical device, or physical therapy. Patients feel a greater sense of connection and accountability to care plans when they are personalized and customized.

For complex instructions like wound care, using medical devices and durable medical equipment, and physical and occupational therapy, patients feel more confident that they can repeat the exercise or instructions at home when they see video of themselves doing it.

There are so many benefits to including custom video as part of a patient’s care plan. The technology is here today, it can be delivered in a HIPAA compliant manner, and it can be stored and easily retrieved. The challenge is that while patients are ready for this, health systems aren’t and the answer is often ‘no’. The risks to the health system, if video is delivered as part of an overall digital patient treatment plan solution are low, but the potential benefits to care are large.

We’ve tracked the evolution of the ‘consumerization of IT’ through other industries. Some have said it can never happen in healthcare, but this is a great example where patients starting to push the envelope and use technology in their care. Let’s hope they are able to convince their doctors as well.

Posted in: Adherence, Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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Reducing Avoidable Readmissions: Transfer to Home

While studies show that discharge to home can be best for patient recovery from surgery, this is an area where communications and continuity of care often break-down, risking readmissions. The idea of a patient-centered medical home where the patient is at the center receiving consistent care from a group that can bring in specialists is intended to solve some of this problem, but better communications between healthcare organization, primary care physician, and patient and the patient’s care team can go a long way to improve discharge to home without requiring an entirely new model.

This post is part of a series recapping a recent training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s course on Reducing Avoidable Readmissions.

Primary care physicians while often the most trusted person in the care team, and besides the patient the person with the best insight into the patient’s overall wellbeing are often out of the loop when it comes to hospitalization. Once a patient is referred to a specialist for surgery the hospital team takes over, and the primary care physician has little insight into what happens, even though when the patient is discharged they are back in the care of the primary care physician. Often the primary care physician has no idea when the patient has been hospitalized or re-hospitalized.

Primary care physicians who were participating in the course expressed both their desire to participate in this post-acute care follow up and frustration at both the lack of insight they had and felt powerless to influence the hospitals.

While the evidence on post-hospitalization follow up visits is mixed, common sense does point to following up with patients as being a good thing to prevent readmissions. However, depending on the model of care, this is either with a primary care physician or a hospitalist. Considering the PCP is responsible for the general health of the patient, moving to reimbursement models where this is possible also seems to make more sense.

 

Source: IHI.org

Source: IHI.org

One example cited was from Capitol District Physicians Health Plan, where physicians were paid to do post acute care follow-ups. The program plus a phone call from a case manager decreased readmissions from 14% to 6%. (Although it would be interesting to know whether the in-person visit or the phone call had the biggest impact.)

As with other sessions in this course, the keys to improving discharge to home were in communication with the patient and patient caregivers around expectations and communication back to the hospitalist or family physician about medication usage at home, and any concerning symptoms. Too often patients understand “You’re discharged” as “You’re better” and miss their responsibilities for doing follow-up care whether that is physical therapy, wound care, or just easing back into activities they participated in prior to surgery. Ensuring patients and their care givers understand that discharge to home still requires follow-up is a key to decreasing readmissions from this setting.

New models of transitional care and intensive care where patients receive personalized follow-up care and regular check-ins with a healthcare professional after hospital discharge were shown to improve overall function in patients, decrease readmissions, and decrease costs. These types of new models become more practical with the carrot of value-based payments coupled the stick of penalties for readmissions. While the overarching goal of decreasing readmissions is about improving patient care, having financial incentives aligned will provide an extra boost.

Continuing with the theme of the course, there is no one silver bullet. There is no one reason that patients readmit. That’s the bad news. The good news is that some basic common sense improvements, like better communication with patients and their care teams can decrease readmissions. We’ll go into more detail on how to improve communications in the next post on this topic.

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Health Regulations, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare transformation

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Developing Exercise Self-Efficacy for Chronic Disease Patients

APTA CSM 2015 Recap: Use of Mobile Health Technology to Facilitate Long-Term Engagement in Exercise in Persons with Chronic Neurological Conditions

Speaker: Robert Motl, PhD

Managing chronic neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s is not easy, and made even more difficult by conflicting research on how to treat issues. For many years it was unclear whether exercise was good or bad for people with Multiple Sclerosis: some thought that exercise increased the inflammation that is a hallmark of the disease. Recent studies have shown the opposite however and this talk was focused on how an Internet-based intervention could improve exercise self-efficacy.

Exercise, in addition to providing increased mobility, has been shown to actually decrease depression and fatigue for these patients, contradicting past beliefs. Unfortunately, many physicians don’t discuss exercise with these patients, and to go from a sedentary lifestyle to one that includes activity, especially for someone with a chronic neurological issue requires support and supervision.

The problem is widespread as only an estimated 20% of MS patients in the US are engaging in levels of physical activity that will have a positive impact, and studies show a linear decrease in activity from initial diagnosis over the course of the disease with a systematic decline in physical activity every 6 months.

Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, Source Ahmed Asim

Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, Source Ahmed Asim

When researcher Robert Motl discovered through a Microsoft-sponsored survey that people with MS were more likely than average to have Internet access (96% had access actually) he decided this would be a great way to educate on the benefits of exercise and attempt to encourage self-sufficiency. He designed an Internet-portal and telemedicine based intervention using Bandura’s techniques of social cognitive theory to effect behavior change.

People learn by observing and by doing and confidence is key for self-efficacy. To accomplish this through an online intervention the website featured personal stories and videos from people who had MS talking about how exercise made a difference for them. People need role models for behavior change and it’s important that those models are similar. The impact of these videos was that people were able to think “If they can do it, so can I.”

Patients were also able to set goals and self-monitor them and communicate in chat rooms with other people with similar situations. After the first year, the website was removed, which may seem strange, but it was done to test whether people would continue with the intervention, which they did. At this point the only support they received 1:1 video chat with a physical therapist to help them check-in and maintain goals.

The main takeaways from this session are that with the right tools and support, which do not have to be expensive, people can change a behavior and maintain self-efficacy. At Wellpepper, we have definitely seen this and hope that more studies like this enable better care through technology and through outside the clinic support.

Note that the other half of this talk explored a yet unpublished study that Boston University is doing with Wellpepper. You can get a sneak preview here, and we’ll be publishing more on this in the future.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, chronic disease, Healthcare motivation, Outcomes

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Translating Evidence-Based Interventions to Practice: Falls Prevention and Otago

APTA CSM 2015 Session Recap: Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change

Presenters:

Mary Altpeter, PhD

Tiffany Shubert, PhD

Clinical Support for Otago

Clinical Support for Otago

The fact that a session entitled “Falls Prevention: Otago Program and Behavior Change “ ended up in the Health Administration /Policy track at APTA CSM 2015 reinforces that we have a long way to go on translating outcomes-based research into care plans. Otago is a proven and effective set of preventative exercises and care for community-dwelling yet frail adults which improves balance and prevents falls risk. It was developed in New Zealand, at the University of Otago over 14 years ago, and prescribes a set of balance and strength exercises that the patient completes independently over 12 months.

Recommended physical therapy visits to access, teach, monitor, and kick-start patient adherence are to occur over 6-8 weeks and after that patients are encouraged to self-manage, and herein lies the reason that this session is in health policy and administration: this is longer than most insurance covers, and there are not currently enough incentives for remote patient monitoring. However, according to presenter Tiffany Schubert, Otago shows an ROI of $1.25 of every dollar invested as it prevents patients from falling which results deterioration to the patient and further burden on the health system.

Barriers to implementing Otago in the US stem largely from reimbursement and the current incident-based payment model that does not facilitate managing patients over a long period of time. As a result, Otago expert and presenter Tiffany Schubert presented an abridged version that might be easier to fit into current payment models.

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

Delivering Otago: Calendar view

However she is also on a crusade to collect outcomes data for Otago in the US so that these barriers can be overcome as the barriers are not just reimbursement. Clinicians have preconceived notions that patients won’t adhere to plans. Tiffany challenges these misconceptions by asking “are you sure or is it your patients just don’t understand.” We’ve definitely seen this with patients we’ve interviewed: they do want to be adherent to their plans but they find out when they get home that they forgot or are confused. Otago and systems like it work well when there is remote support for the patient.

Clinical Barriers to Implementation

Clinical Barriers to Implementing Otago

Given that Otago requires a high-level of patient self-efficacy, understanding factors that impact behavior change is key in driving long-term outcomes and adherence. Hence, the second half of this presentation, from Mary Altpeter focused on strategies to help patients develop self-management skills to complete the independent part of the program. One of the big misconceptions, that we hear frequently from healthcare providers (and definitely from many of the sensor and tracker vendors), is that knowledge is sufficient to effect change. It’s not, many other factors weigh in including readiness to change and social influences. Understanding more about the patient’s own journey and the patient’s barriers and readiness to change can make a big difference in this area. Also understanding the patient’s goals is crucial and personalizing their risk of not changing their behavior.

Breaking behavior change down into stages can really help move the patient along a path. In this session, Altpeter outlined a 5 stage model to affect patient behavior.

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

6-Stage Behavior Change Model

Understanding that while your assessment may show that the patient is at risk for falls, the patient may not have internalized this. First step is to plant the seed of doubt while the patient is in what is called the “Pre-Contemplation” stage. You can do this by personalizing the risk.

In a falls scenario, patients are not actually worried about falls risk. This sounds counter intuitive, but patient goals are usually not functional goals they are life goals. (We can attest to this from the goals patients set in Wellpepper.) So, the patient may be worried about losing their driver’s license which might happen if they had limited mobility. This is moving to patient-centered goals from clinical goals which personalizes the risk. Find out what the patient might be afraid of losing and this can start to plant the seed of doubt that they might be at risk for falls.

During the Contemplation phase the healthcare professional can help the patient break down what it might look like to be able to embark on a program. What might be their barriers or sticking points to do so? When might they do it? This isn’t about making a plan it’s about facilitating the patient in thinking that a plan might be possible.

The next phase Preparation, occurs when the patient has demonstrated that he or she is ready to change, and this is where we can examine the nuts and bolts, breaking down what may seem like a daunting task (adhering to a program for 12 years), into something manageable. Here is where you help the come up with plans to overcome the barriers you identified. One key barrier is often fear of relapse: that is that when a patient stops doing the plan, they can’t get back on the wagon, so to speak. Making it okay to “start over” is a great way to encourage patients.

During the preparation phase you may also want to help the patient break down the program into smaller goals and manageable chunks so they can see progress during the program. Also help the patient identify rewards that will help drive their adherence. These are both important steps when helping with a large and often intangible goal.

Action is putting the plan into place. Here your main role is to support the patient, help them continue to overcome barriers, and be a cheerleader to keep them going in the case of a relapse.

The final stage is Maintenance (which includes dealing with Relapse). Pointing out the patient progress, possibly by completing another falls assessment and showing the difference is a great way to reinforce that the program worked and it’s worth continuing. Also ask the patient to remember what fears they had before the program and whether they feel that now. Simply shining a light on their own experience can help a lot here.

With an aging population, and rising health costs, translating valuable and proven research like the information in this session into clinical practice is key. Given that the average time from research to implementation is 17 years, and that Otago was invented 14 years ago, we can only hope to see widespread adoption by 2018. That’s also in-line with CMS’s new requirements for 50% of Medicare spend being for new value and outcome-based models. It’s time right?

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Behavior Change, Exercise Physiology, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare transformation, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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Get Your Engines Ready for CSM 2015 Indianapolis

CSM2015Marquee_960x222I’m not a physical therapist, healthcare professional, nor do I play one on TV, but I can’t wait for my third American Physical Therapy Association conference. While I’ll be spending most of my time at our booth (2114 if you’re looking) on the exhibition floor, I’ve managed to find a shortlist of 46 sessions I’d like to attend, and this is from someone who is not looking for clinical practice sessions.

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 11.10.50 AMNext week over 10,000 physical therapists, doctors of physical therapy, PhD researchers, and students will converge on Indianapolis (yes, in winter) for the annual American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. The Combined Sections Meeting or CSM as it’s often referred to (we do love our acronyms in healthcare) combines all the interest groups and professional associations within the association including private practice, oncology, neurology, homecare, acute care, orthopedics, sports medicine, and students and academic researchers. The result is a diversity of topics that represent the major trends in healthcare today including: concussions in youth sports; the impact of the Affordable Care Act on practice; high-intensity interval training; caring for an aging population; managing chronic disease; preventative medicine, health and wellness; healthcare technology; and the psychology of pain.

See for yourself in a selection of some of the 46 sessions we’ve flagged:

Sports Concussions in Youth: The Role of PT for a Surging Population

Transforming Physical Therapy Practice for Healthcare Reform

Exercise Prescription for the Older Adult With Multiple Chronic Conditions

Getting Patients Into Cardiac Rehab and Other Wellness Programs and Keeping Them Exercising After Rehab

Google Glass in Physical Therapy Education and Clinical Practice

High-Intensity Interval Training: Rehab Considerations for Health and Cardiovascular Risk

Practice Issues Forum: Does Medicare Really Cover Maintenance Therapy?

I Have Arthritis. Is My Running Career Over? Evidence-Based Management of the Runner With Osteoarthritis

Called to Care: Integration of Positive Psychology

Integrating Physical Therapy in Emerging Health Care Models

Virtual Reality and Serious Game-Based Rehabilitation for Injured Service Members

Of course, our most anticipated session will be “Use of Mobile Health Technology to Facilitate Long-Term Engagement in Exercise in Persons with Chronic Neurological Conditions” where Dr. Terry Ellis Director of the Center for Neurorehabilitation and a Associate Professor at Boston University will be presenting the results of a study where they used Wellpepper and Fitbit to improve adherence to home exercise programs for people with Parkinson’s disease. For a sneak preview of what she will present, see this article from Inside Sargent Magazine.

As in 2013 and 2014, we will do our best to blog about as many sessions as we can so that if you can’t make it to the conference this year, you can still experience some of the flavor.

If you’re going to CSM, what sessions are you looking forward to most?

Posted in: Adherence, Aging, Exercise Physiology, Health Regulations, Physical Therapy, Prehabilitation, Rehabilitation Business, Sports Medicine

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Should Patients set SMART or MEANING(ful) Goals?

Goal setting provides incentive, improves adherence, and helps measure progress. Right? Maybe. Presenters in the session “Goal Setting in Rehabilitation: Theory, Practice, Evidence” at the annual American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine conference in Toronto were consistent in their believe that goal setting is important for rehabilitation but also pointed out a lack of evidence and a distinct lack of consistency in application. It seems that goal setting theory in healthcare has been largely borrowed from business and sports, and while it makes sense that goal setting should help patients, there is not a lot of decisive evidence and there is a lot of debate on how goals should be set.

Does goal setting work?

A survey of the clinical research on goal-setting in rehabilitation showed that goal setting didn’t improve physical function, however it did improve patient self-efficacy. Evidence was inconclusive on whether goal setting affected motivation, adherence, or engagement. However, the overall analysis showed a statistically significant difference in favor of goal setting. The issue is how goals are set and could setting them differently improve care.

How are goals set?

Currently the usual care condition for setting goals is having healthcare professionals set them instead of patients. The problem with this is that the goals may be SMART, but they are not meaningful for the patients. There is often a mismatch between patient and physician goals: physician goals are often functional goals and patient goals are quality of life or aspirational goals. Since goal seems to have a bigger impact on intrinsic factors, like efficacy and possibly also satisfaction, it seems that patient-directed goals would be more effective.

The following are “SMART goals” adapted to apply in rehabilitation. However, the speakers adapted them slightly to apply more directly to rehabilitation. (Assignable rather than achievable.)

Specific, measurable, assignable, realistic, time bound
 
 

How should goals be set?

Goals that help a patient connect with their care plan are preferred, for example, goals that fit the following criteria.

MEANING goal setting

 

While presenter Kath McPherson from the Auckland Institute of Technology argued that patient goals could be vague and also asked why goals had to be realistic: wasn’t it better that the patient continued to hope and work towards something, William M. M. Levack the concept of helping patients set “fiduciary” goals. That is, guide the patients goals based on the situation more initially and less as the patient gained autonomy. To illustrate this he used the example of Mr Roberts a blind diabetic amputee who had a goal of going home to live. If Mr. Roberts’ goal were the only thing taken into consideration, it would ignore the realistic factors that might not make this possible, for example, his wife’s ability to care for him. As such, a better approach for goal setting for Mr. Roberts was to consider a number of factors including:

  • The values and preferences of the patient
  • Clinical judgment of the healthcare professional
  • Time and resources required for the goal
  • Likely consequences of pursuing the goal

For Mr. Roberts, this approach would look like this:

value pluralism in goal setting

The takeaway from these sessions was the necessity to link the clinicians small functional goals with the patients big aspirational goals. Functional goals are necessary and will measure progress but aspirational goals are what drives patient self efficacy which is so important for recovery.

 

We think a lot about goal setting and patient reported outcomes at Wellpepper. Patient reported outcomes are great tools to show progress and also validate clinical efficacy but they must be linked to patient’s goals for real impact. We’re working on some interesting ways to do this through our technology and are excited to be able to share this with the rehabilitation medicine community.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Business

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Patient Engagement: From Idea to Proof

In the last year, patient engagement has gone from buzzword to a clinically proven solution to rising healthcare costs. A study published in 2013 in Health Affairs found that engaged patients in the first year of the study were 8% less expensive that non-engaged patients in the base year. As the years progressed and the impact of some of the behaviors of non-engaged patients like diet, exercise, and smoking had a bigger impact, the gap was expected to widen.  Cost drivers were use of emergency room services and hospitalization of these non-engaged patients.medicalperson

“Patients With Lower Activation Associated With Higher Costs; Delivery Systems Should Know Their Patients’ ‘Scores”http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/32/2/216.full?sid=bd3de9e3-8393-4553-bf75-ebb537b75905

At the same time, technology has been heralded as the solution for engaging patients, and the quantified self-movement was the poster child for tracking health metrics. The problem is that the people who were doing all this tracking were pretty engaged to begin with and therefore not representative of the population as a whole. Other solutions used rewards for behavior change, like gift cards or donations to favorite charities. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that these types of rewards systems are good at enrolling patients in health engagement programs but not good at helping them sustain good habits. http://mobihealthnews.com/35244/study-rewards-boost-enrollment-but-not-sustained-engagement/

personA combination of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards is seen to be much more motivating. Intrinsic rewards are the ones that are built directly into an experience, for example Facebook likes or Twitter retweets. We know from our experience at Wellpepper that a combination of intrinsic rewards coupled with the accountability through a connection with the healthcare provider creates more adherent patients and better outcomes. Our patient engagement rates hover around 70% (compared to 2-3% for some EHR portals), and we have some providers with patients who are 100% adherent to their treatment plans. Look for more news on this topic in the fall of 2014 when we release the results of some clinical studies that use Wellpepper.

Technology for health-related behavior change is still in its infancy. However, with the right combinations of factors that motivate patients, the benefits are clear: better engagement and better outcomes. For patients, using technology for health engagement provides them with convenient and cost effective solutions. There are also benefits across the health system.

Using technology for patient engagement can enable:

  • Remote care and monitoring. This covers both outpatient discharge and aging in place. Enabling people to recover or live at home longer improves their experience and lowers overall healthcare costs. New models of care are also possible as remote communication can employ specialists in different areas of the country or the world.

“There is a nationwide shortage of such critical-care specialists, known as “intensivists,” so the idea is that these doctors can monitor more patients remotely than if they were on-site at a single hospital.” USA Today

  • medical bldgOperating at the top of your license. Predicted shortages of primary care physicians due to an increased demand from more coverage and an aging population are not overstated. Technology that enables physicians to scale their abilities to cover patients by offloading some care and monitoring to other disciplines like nurse practitioners can help ease this burden.

“We use what we call Teamlettes. A group of people assigned to every patient. Administrative, clinical, psychiatric, all of us working at the top of our license, because there’s a lot of stuff done in medicine that can be done at other levels.” Mike Witte, Medical Director Coastal Health Alliance

  • Patient-reported data. Patient-data is already in our systems, from patient interviews, however it’s inputted by healthcare professionals and relies on patient memory of previous events. Enabling patients to enter health data as they experience it can result in more accurate information and also a more efficient in-person visit as the healthcare professional and patient can review what’s been entered rather than trying to remember what happened over the course of several days or weeks between in-person visits.

“Patient-created, and patient-curated information is the key to the future. We need to build tools that are based on this assumption. They need to be in line with what consumers are accustomed to in other aspects of their lives – they need to work on mobile devices as well as the web.” Robert Rowley, MD 

  • Community support. Engaging community organizations in helping patients, is both beneficial and cost-effective. Community organizations and centers can play an active role in helping people manage their health. Enabling patients to have key health-related information with them outside the clinic can help professionals like fitness or diet coaches engage. Providing the patient with ways to engage around their health in a community setting can help encourage and foster new habits. Medicare is piloting a number of programs designed to increase community involvement and decrease readmissions.
  • Managing groups of people. Websites like “Patients Like Me” and “Ben’s Friends” started as grassroots patient support groups facilitated by the vast reach of the Internet. If patients can meet and discuss their health, healthcare organizations should also be able to facilitate the management of people with similar issues. Technology can facilitate the ability to send similar treatment plans, communication, and tips to groups of people.

This is just the beginning of what’s possible. Technology advances will facilitate new ways of monitoring, communicating, and engaging that we haven’t even considered. We’re pretty excited about how engaging patients can improve outcomes and ultimately result in major positive changes in the health of countries and the way care is delivered. It’s still early days and patients, providers, insurers, and technologists are all still learning but there is so much opportunity to have a real impact.

Posted in: Adherence, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation

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