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Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation: A Novel Mobile Intervention For People With Parkinson’s Disease

In 2013, when we were a brand new m-health company, we had the good fortune to meet Terry Ellis, PhD, Director of the Center for Neurorehabilitation at Boston University. Dr. Ellis was an early investigator in the value of digital interventions, and saw an opportunity to partner with Wellpepper so that her team could focus on the new care models, and Wellpepper could focus on the technology. The first building blocks in the Wellpepper platform aligned closely with outpatient rehabilitation, and Dr Ellis and team wanted to prove that people who had Parkinson disease could improve strength and mobility without costly in-person visits. At Wellpepper, we also had an interest in proving that mobile health can improve outcomes, and also that those 50 plus could use mobile technology.

Persons with Parkinson Disease (PD) have been described as 29% less active than older adults without PD, and see a 12% decline in mobility for each year after their first diagnosis with the disease. In-person interventions with physical therapists can help, but in the usual care condition, a person has one in-person assessment at The Center for Neurorehabilitation, and may not be seen again for 6 months to a year, during which time there was a decline in mobility. Dr Ellis and team were looking for a way to prove out a novel intervention that could improve outcomes for these patients.

Patient Experience

This video does a great job of showing the patient experience, both with the clinician and while using the application at home.

User Journey from Wellpepper on Vimeo.

Outcomes

While Dr. Ellis and team are still analyzing additional data, and will be submitting to a peer-reviewed journal, and are exploring expanded studies on the topic, we can share some very promising results.

  • This study revealed that using mobile health technology to remotely monitor and adapt exercise programs between bouts of care in persons with Parkinson disease was feasible and acceptable.
  • On average, subjects engaged with the app every week for 85% (+/- 20%) of the weeks with an 87% satisfaction rating.
  • Significant improvements in physical activity, walking and balance measures were observed over 12 months.
  • People who showed lower exercise self-efficacy at the beginning of the study saw the greatest gains.

Technology

  • This technology used the Wellpepper platform, clinic application for iPad, and patient application for iOS. Requirements were for ease of use for both clinicans and patients. Features include the ability to record custom video of patients doing their exercises, for patients to record results, and for patients and providers to message securely with each other.
  • Fitbit was used for patients to track non-exercise activity, and this was the first integration of a consumer exercise tracker with the Wellpepper platform.
  • The entire Wellpepper platform is built on Amazon Web Services, in a HIPAA secure manner, which was a requirement for the study. No data was stored on mobile devices and all personal health information was encrypted in transit and at rest.
  • The Boston University team required a monthly data extract of all patient-generated data for their analysis purposes.
  • Post study, we were able to analyze anonymized patient-provider messages using a machine learned message classifier, and have presented this data at digital health conferences.

The positive preliminary results of this study, lead to a larger study with seniors at risk of falls, lead by principal investigator Jonathan Bean, MD from Harvard Medical School. Details of this intervention are available here. While Dr Bean is also in the process of submitting to a peer-reviewed journal, his assessment is that outcomes exceeded clinically significant measures.

We are looking forward to sharing more about the results of both of these studies when they are publicly available in peer-reviewed journals. If you are a researcher who would like to know more, contact us and we may be able to put you in touch with the study leads.

Posted in: Clinical Research, Exercise Physiology, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health

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