Blog

Author Archive

Wellpepper goes to Vegas for HIMSS16!

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 4.03.54 PM

 

Sunny and 70’s all week,Vegas here we come! We will try to bring some sun back with us.Vegas Weather HIMSS Blog

We will be in booth #5 @ the HX360. Let us know if you’ll be attending HIMSS16 by sending us a tweet @wellpepper.

Contact us, to set up a meeting with Anne Weiler CEO or Robin VP of Business Development 

The annual HIMSS conference is almost here! A few tips.  Wear comfortable shoes and your Fitbit, you will be walking miles. With over 43K in attendance at HIMSS15, the lines for coffee and food were long.  Bring a few snacks and get your morning coffee before you get to the conference!

So many interesting and inspiring education sessions, so little time! Between walking and navigating the crowds, it can take up to 10-15 minutes to get where you are going so take some time to plan out your education sessions. Get to the sessions early if you want a seat, many sessions end up being standing room only. 

Stop by to see Wellpepper CEO Anne Weiler on this panel which is part of the HX360 Innovation Leaders Program

Date: Monday, February 29, 2016: [Time: 2:30 PM – 3:15 PM]

Session Title: Flexible Care to Fit the Second Half of Life: from Independent Aging to Acute & Long Term Care

Session Description:  How can technology support flexible, high quality, cost-efficient care delivery that meets patients’ needs in the second half of life? Where are the most egregious gaps in care for older patients? These are the questions that will be explored by our panel, covering topics ranging from aging independently to rehabilitation, home care support, family caregiving and honoring end-of-life wishes.

Here are some of our  education session picks.

Connected Health

March 1, 2016 — 08:45AM – 09:45AM : Trends & Resources in Connected Health: Harnessing the power of mobile for research 

Clinical and Business Intelligence                                                                

March 1, 2016 — 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Actionable Analytics: From Predictive Modeling to Workflows

March 3, 2016 — 02:30PM – 03:00PM: Getting to Big Data Insights in Healthcare

Consumer and Patient Engagement

March 2, 2016 — 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Patient Engagement – The Next Chapter

March 4, 2016 — 12:00PM – 01:00PM: Patient Engagement Beyond Patient Portal-Strategic Approach

Care Coordination and Population Health

March 1, 2016 — 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Too Many Patient Portals – What Can You Do About It?

March 1, 2016 — 01:00PM – 02:00PM: Coordinated Health: The Experience You Should Expect

March 1, 2016 — 03:15PM – 03:45PM: mHealth solution for remote patient engagement

March 1, 2016 — 04:45PM – 05:15PM: Rethinking patient engagement and provider workflow

Clinical Informatics and Clinician Engagement

March 1, 2016 — 04:00PM – 05:00PM: Enhancing Patient Outcomes with Big Data: Two Case Studies

March 2, 2016 — 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Taking Plans of Care from Clinician to Patient-Centric

March 2, 2016 — 01:00PM – 02:00PM: Seven Essentials in Clinical Information Technology Adoption

 

Posted in: Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, M-health, Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Is Seattle Ready For A Seismic Shift In Healthcare?

The plans to open the Cambia Grove, a health care innovation center, were first announced about this same time last year at the 25th Annual Governor’s Life Sciences Summit. Nicole Bell, executive director of Cambia Grove was then quoted saying, “Why couldn’t we be for health care what we are for coffee, aerospace, for online retail and for independent rock-and-roll?”IMG_2081

A year later and timed perfectly to coincide with the 17th Annual National Institutes of Health (NIH)/SBIR/STTR Conference, Cambia Grove announced results from the 9 page “Report on Health Care Innovation in Washington State.” This report effectively established a baseline for the economic impact of health care innovation sub-sector in Seattle. Based on the numbers, it seems as though Seattle is poised to compete with rival health care hubs like Boston and the Bay Area.

IMG_0412Here are a few of the more impressive stats. Pay levels are for this sub-sector of this industry are 8% higher than average with $2B in compensation, not to shabby. Apparently these employees are amazing rock stars with 300% more productivity than an average worker and they create $6.8B in direct output?!?!? With this astounding productivity that 8% doesn’t seem like quite a commensurate salary increase.  While there are 22,500 jobs across the state, it is not surprising that over 80% of them are concentrated in Seattle. After Nicole Bell revealed these report highlights, she commented that it would make sense to create or convert even more jobs in to this thriving job sector. I guess we bike riding, coffee drinking, online shopping, wearing jeans and Tevas to work Seattlites must really be on to something here.

I am absolutely thrilled to have taken a path that is leading me into this new sub-sector of healthcare innovation and start-ups where evidently I’ll be working in the land of serious overachievers. As a RN, I’m no stranger to long hours and hard work. Coming from traditional healthcare institutions where the norms are grueling 12-hour shifts, you literally have to ask someone if you can go pee because you can’t leave your patients unattended and you learn to ingest your lunch in under 5 minutes.

IMG_0413As much as working in traditional healthcare has taught me clinically, I couldn’t imagine moving into a healthcare IT analyst role after completing my Masters degree in Clinical Informatics. I imagine if I stayed, I’d probably end-up stuck in a cube trying to unscramble the EHR mess or analyzing already broken workflows attempting to integrated a new piece of technology that never went through any real usability testing by actual healthcare workers who would be suing it. Having used both Epic and Cerner products, I was like “I told you so!” after reading articles about the recently published JAMA reporting the lack of adherence by EHR vendors to conduct usability testing. I digress. My point is I’m waiting with bated breath for the lagging traditional healthcare industry to get the swift kick it needs by the younger, more ambitious and more productive innovation sub-sector. The report is effectively calling out to health innovators in Seattle that the time for a seismic shift is now…in healthcare, hopefully not literally a seismic shift in Seattle. Either way, Seattle Health Innovators prepare yourselves, let’s get ready to compete with Boston and the Bay Area.

Posted in: Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Research, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation, Seattle

Leave a Comment (0) →

P4 Medicine, How You Can Live To Be 100

I was fortunate enough to be on the guest list for the event, “An Evening Discovering Scientific Wellness” hosted by Arivale at Chihuly Garden and Glass this past week.  The space was packed with over 600 guests, which included: students, scientists, nurses, entrepreneurs, investors, doctors, schoolteachers, software engineers and really anyone with an interest in being part of a new transformation in healthcare.   My fascination with what Arivale plans to do originates from three different perspectives: as a scientist with an undergraduate degree in Neurobiology, a healthcare provider (Registered Nurse) and most currently as a graduate student in Clinical Informatics with a penchant for technology. Arivale plans to bring together all of my interests in science, clinical data and technology to create a personalized plan to optimize wellness.

Be forewarned, P4 Medicine (Predictive, Preventative, Personalized and Participatory), is not for the squeamish.  Maybe you have seen the funny coffee table book “What’s Your Poo Telling You?” Well, now it can tell you more than you ever imagined. Arivale, a new Seattle start-up co-founded by biomedical pioneer Leroy Hood, MD, PhD, actually aims to analyze your microbiome (the polite word for poop and/or the bugs inside you) as one part of their unique approach to transform how we think about our health.

Clayton Lewis, CEO and co-founder of Arivale, introduced co-founder Lee Hood (who probably needs no introduction in Seattle) as a visionary man who “speaks about the future in the present tense.”  Dr. Hood described how Arivale evaluates samples of blood, saliva, microbiome, genetic sequencing and Fitbit data to give participants an entirely personalized set of actionable health data. The fundamental piece is a personal coach who will create a tailored wellness plan.  Not only will the coach call each month to check-in and guide the participant but, they will also integrate any new data and make adjustments to the original plan.

After hearing Arivales pitch, I do question how they plan to deal with the FDA and providing P4 medicine complete with health recommendations to consumers. This is not entirely dissimilar what 23andMe tried to do 2 years ago marketing Personal Genomic Services directly to consumers and shortly thereafter, the FDA required them to stop. Since then, 23andMe has gone through several rounds of R&D and now has the official blessing from the FDA. Along with the FDA approval of 23andMe earlier this year, the FDA also announced two important pieces of regulatory information making the path for other companies like Arivale easier.

  1. FDA is [sic] classifying carrier screening tests as class II. In addition, the FDA intends to exempt these devices from FDA premarket review.
  2. The FDA believes that in many circumstances it is not necessary for consumers to go through a licensed practitioner to have direct access to their personal genetic information.

Why is P4 Medicine so important? The crowd of at least several hundred let out a collective murmur of surprise when Dr. Hood dropped the factoid, ‘living to be 100 is going to be new norm for children being born into the next generation’. He jokingly followed with, “We want to get you to 100 and then you are on your own.” He pointed out that while our genetics may give us the predisposition for certain diseases, they don’t necessarily define our health.  If genetic variants are known, you can do something about them. Arivale wants to provide people with meaningful, personalized diagnostic information so as to optimize as many aspects of their health as possible.  The goal is to make those 100 years of life full of vigor, fitness and optimal health.

Next, two of the original 100 Arivale pioneers took the stage and spoke about their experiences.  The first woman explained her diagnosis of a ‘suspect immune system’ and not having enough T-cells.  This came along with a daily dose of antibiotics and lot of ‘no’s’ to activities she enjoyed such as long distance running.  The microbiome testing revealed that the antibiotic was not wiping out her endogenous gut flora.  Based on genetics, hiking in the woods, not long distance running, was the best exercise for her.  With Arivale, she realized her body was resilient, adaptive and was able to literally ‘start trusting her gut.’  In describing her experience with Arivale, she ended by saying, “Instead of seeing myself as a sickly, non-running person, I now see a person with a diverse life, a diverse gut and an adaptive life.”

The second woman opened by recounted her entertaining experience of giving birth during the 2nd quarter of the Superbowl last year. Her motivation to join the current cohort of 300 Arivale participants, was due in part to optimize her health but she also wants to be around as long as possible for her child. She is part way through the program, has received stellar results on her blood work and just the day before received her genetics phone call. Her genetics revealed a moderate risk for obesity and that her body had difficulties disposing of toxins. Going forward, Arivale will make recommendations on for life style changes based on these revelations.

Patient engagement is one of the newer buzzwords in healthcare and Arivale really gives it a new spin. We are entering a new era where people have access to the data and tools available to truly be active participants and take more control over their health outcomes.  We can no longer lay the blame on genetics because as Arivale is proving, we can now make informed decisions that can alter the expression of our genes and help us to achieve our wellness potential.

After the presentations were over, I went to the Info table to see how I could be part of this second set of 300 beta participants in the Greater Seattle area this fall. Sadly, it is not free this time around, the cost is now $1,999.

Posted in: Health Regulations, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare motivation, Healthcare transformation, Seattle

Leave a Comment (0) →
Google+