Blog

Are Women Better Surgeons? Patient-Generated Data Knows The Answer

As empowerers of patients and collectors of patient-generated data, we’re pretty bullish on the ability for this data to show insights. We fully admit to being biased, and view things through a lens of the patient experience and outcomes, which is why we had some ideas about a recent study that showed female surgeons had better outcomes than male surgeons.

The study, conducted on data from Ontario, Canada, was a retrospective population analysis of patients of male and female surgeons looking at rates of complications, readmissions, and death. The results of the study showed that patients of female surgeons had a small but statistically significant decrease in 30-day mortality and similar surgical outcomes.

Does this mean that women are technically better surgeons? Probably not. However, there is one sentence that stands out to a possible reason that patients of female surgeons had better outcomes.

A retrospective analysis showed no difference in outcomes by surgeon sex in patients who had emergency surgery, where patients do not usually choose their surgeon.

This would lead us to believe that there is something about the relationship between the patient and the provider that is resulting in better outcomes. We have seen this at Wellpepper, while we haven’t broken our aggregate data down by gender lines, we have seen that within the same clinic, intervention, and patient population, we see significant differences in patient engagement and outcomes between patients being seen by different providers.

Some healthcare professionals are better than others at motivating patients, and the relationship between provider and patient is key for adherence to care plans which improve outcomes. By tracking patient outcomes and adherence by provider, using patient-generated data, we are able to see insights that go beyond what a retroactive study from EMR data can show.

While our treatment plans, and continued analysis of patient outcomes against those treatment plans go much further than simply amplifying the patient-provider relationship, for example with adaptive reminders, manageable and actionable building blocks, and instant feedback, never underestimate the power of the human connection in healthcare.

Posted in: Adherence, Behavior Change, big data, Clinical Research, patient-generated data

Leave a Comment (0) ↓

Leave a Comment

Google+