Blog

Archive for September, 2018

Podcasts for Healthcare Transformation Enthusiasts

If you like to nerd out about healthcare, we’ve got a cornucopia of great podcasts for you to choose from in no particular order. Happy listening!

White Coat Black Art

This long-running podcast from CBC radio in Canada is hosted by Brian Goldman, MD, and does not shy away from tough topics like assisted suicide, medical errors, or the health impacts of legalizing marijuana.

 

A Healthy Dose

Steve Kraus of Bessemer Partners and Trevor Price of Oxeon partners interview a who’s who of health tech pioneers and entrepreneurs. Their conversation with AthenaHealth founder Jonathan Bush on cold medicine is not to be missed.

 

 

Inside Health

This BBC podcast hosted by Mark Porter, MD, explores fact and fiction for common health issues, and the state of the National Health System in the UK. It’s worth listening both for the medical advice and for insight into a different system of care.

 

 

Tech Tonics

Tech Tonics David Shaywitz, MD, PhD, and Venture Valkyrie, Lisa Suennen weigh in on unicorns and reality, and interview physicians and founders in this health tech focused podcast.

 

 

 

This Week In Healthcare IT

This Week In Health ITFormer hospital CIO current expert in cloud computing for healthcare, Bill Russell interviews health IT experts, with a heavy emphasis on hospital healthcare IT experts on topics like security, interoperability, and the shift to the cloud.

 

 

Well Connected

Innovation veteran, Joe Kvedar, MD from Partners Health interviews peers and colleagues on both current and new technologies.

 

Outcomes Rocket


This podcast from Saul Marquez delivers with a focus on outcomes, value, and cost-savings in healthcare.

 

 

 

Voice First Health

Alexa enthusiast, and Canadian physician, Teri Fisher, MD is bullish on the potential for voice interactions in healthcare.

Posted in: Healthcare costs, Healthcare Disruption, Healthcare Social Media, Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation

Leave a Comment (0) →

Reflecting on Wellpepper

I am a third year internal medicine resident from the University of Georgia. For the last four weeks I had the good fortune to travel from Athens, Georgia to Seattle, Washington and work with Wellpepper as a resident physician consultant. As a young physician, I have a lot of hope for electronic health systems and their ability to decrease our workload, increase our efficiency, and improve patient care. In residency, we spend anywhere from 25% to 75% of our time looking at the electronic medical record, but we do not get the opportunity to see it from the other side. When I found out about the opportunity to work with a health tech company for an elective rotation, it seemed like a great way to see things from different perspective. There was the added benefit of escaping a humid Georgia summer month and instead spending it in the beautiful Pacific Northwest where I hope to work after residency.

While at Wellpepper I worked on a variety of projects in several different roles. My primary responsibility was to work on care plan development. A particular care plan they were interested in based on feedback from their customers was pain and opioid management. Considering the opioid epidemic we are currently facing in medicine, this seemed like a great idea. Many of the patients in our resident clinic are chronic pain patients or come to us already on opioids from other providers. Unfortunately, I have received very little training in opioid management (our residency clinic is not allowed to prescribe opioids or benzodiazepines) . While I understand the sentiment behind this, it is not helpful to residents who need to learn how to manage these types of medications for their future practices . Developing a care plan around opioid management presented a wonderful learning opportunity. I designed the opioid care plan and taper program with the opioid-naïve physician in mind, providing a platform to help guide patients and physicians through the intricacies of opioid management and withdrawal. Many of the other care plans I helped work on throughout the month were more on the surgical side of things, but closely related to internal medicine because of how often we work with pre and post-surgical management of patients and these also provided great learning opportunities.

The month culminated in a trip to meet with Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Wellpepper has a unique partnership with Mayo Clinic to build their care plan best practices into the Wellpepper platform to help improve patient care and outcomes. Participating in meetings with administrators, secretaries, clinical research nurses, and physicians at the forefront of their specialties was an extremely unique opportunity . I thought my medical school, the University of Kansas, was a big hospital. It paled in comparison to the small city of Mayo Clinic. It was quite the experience just to be there.

In short, my month with Wellpepper provided a glimpse into the medical tech industry and provided a unique opportunity to work as a consultant outside of patient care. In the electronic medical record world, the focus is on functionality for the healthcare providers. Apps for patient use present an interesting challenge in creating something that is clinically useful for providers but also user friendly and not bogged down in medical jargon for the patients to be able to navigate. It was nice to experience seeing what creating those types of tools for patients looked like from a perspective other than the provider. There were plenty of learning opportunities throughout the month (as well as plenty of extremely valuable study time with board exams on the horizon). While I do not see working exclusively as a physician consultant in my immediate future, I plan to continue to champion electronic health records and mobile services to pursue continued improvement in patient care and outcomes .

From left to right: Myself, Anne Weiler, and Luke Feaster visiting Mayo Clinic.

Posted in: Healthcare Technology, Healthcare transformation

Leave a Comment (0) →
Google+